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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I figured it would be good to ask some experts in this forum about the 2824 movement in my hamilton. I 'discovered' what appears to be a missing screw in the movement of the watch but I'm not sure if its an accurate observation as nothing seems to be wrong with the watch functions.

I've attached a photo of the movement here with indications on the photo where I'm wondering if there is a problem. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance!

 

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This caliber and it's brothers and sisters go into a multitude of cases. I am not intimate with this caliber but I believe it is either an unused case clamp slot or could even be a hole for manufacturing, hard to see in the picture. Check the opposite side fro a matching slot. If the movement is in tight I would not loose any sleep over it. Good observation though.
 

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That screw hole is for the case ring/movement clamp screw.

I do not know if they use a nylon case ring but even in some metal case rings it is not used.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi Henry, thanks for the inputs. I noticed it when I was cleaning my other 2824 based watch has a screw over that particular spot and that led me to post here.

But yeah, it doesn't feel loose at all as nothing seems to rattle, in fact, have been running that Hamilton for over 2 years w/o any problems, just checking to make sure that I'm not slowly killing my watch by carelessly ignoring a potential problem. Thanks!

P.s - Thanks for the info too lysanderxiii, that was a good learning point!
 

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Hi -

This is where a mounting screw would be used if your watch used one instead of a retaining ring. I just checked ETA`s schematics and there is no part that goes into that particular screw hole.

Nothing to be concerned with.

Generally speaking, all screws in a modern watch are tightened with adequate force and should show no loosening over time. Even vintage watches usually do not have any such problems. The screws have very, very fine threadings and this provides more than enough friction over the length of the threading to ensure that the screw, hand tightened to a modicum of firmness, will not work its way free.

JohnF
 
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