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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased an Poljot recently (late 70s) and I noticed it keeps better time when I wind it up and leave in on a shelf. If I wear it all the time it will lose about 3 minutes per 24 hours. I think it does lose some time on the shelf but not as much. (There is a possibility I am imagining this difference.

Is this possible? If so
Why does this occur?
I heard it might be temperature related. Perhaps the heat of my wrist affecting watch. Or is it the movement of my hand.

Could this be fixed by regulation?
 

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Hi there,

this theme was recently widely discusssed:
https://www.watchuseek.com/f6/watches-tend-run-slower-when-worn-838026.html

The short answers: Yes, most mechanical watches run slower when worn, and no, you can't reduce the difference by adjustments. So you have mainly these options:
1) Adjust the average rate according to your personal pattern of daily motions
2) Buy a watch, where this effect is smaller - e.g. high grade, high beat rate, or both.
3) The economy approach: Don't move the wrist where the watch is tied around

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Speedmaster coaxial on 1247 Omega shark mesh
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A good read on watch adjustment and regulation is the TM 9-1575 manual (free, not too long, explains the jargon instead of assuming it).

Just as with dogs and cats, the reaction of your watch on solar flares will depend on your own. If, upon hearing of the flare, you dove under the nearest desk or table, or flung yourself across the room to hide under the bed, chances are you knocked your watch on something. It would notice that and react.
 

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In a highly general sense, gross positional variations (they're all gross, but some are grosser then others) are caused because something in the watch is reacting to the additional force of gravity acting on it in a specific direction. That's usually (but not always) because its encountering higher friction in the position. It could also just be that there's a piece of dirt or something that's moving around. Either way, the (again, highly generalized) solution is to fully clean the watch, ensure that all the jewels are perfectly clean and have no cracks, that all the bushings are clean and have no scoring or burrs on them, and that all pivots are clean and polished. The polishing/deburring can cause problems though, because this removes material, and if you remove too much you'll change the side-shake of the wheel, which will cause other problems.
 

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In a highly general sense, gross positional variations (they're all gross, but some are grosser then others) are caused because something in the watch is reacting to the additional force of gravity acting on it in a specific direction. That's usually (but not always) because its encountering higher friction in the position. . . . . . .
When a vector component of gravity is working on the hairspring in line with the regulator's pins (common), the rate will increase or decrease as the hairspring contacts the effected pin(s) for a longer or shorter period of time than it would otherwise. No friction is involved in the effective shortening and/or lengthing of the hairspring and the effects on the respective half cycles of the ballance's oscillation usually aren't symetrical. Similarly, pallet forks that aren't symetrical in their c.g. with respect to their arbor, can impart more or less impulse in one direction of the balance's rotation than it would otherwise when the arbor is partially (or fully) perpendicular to gravity and thereby contibute beat error's contribution to rate variance. Again, friction isn't involved. There are other similar non-frictional contributions to positional rate variation.
 

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I'm not sure that those effects really qualify as "gross" positional variations in the context of the OP's question though...the effects of your examples is usually a bit more subtle then the 180 seconds per day variation observed.
News flash. Properly repaired/serviced watches don't have 2 min deltas. lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well now I've done it. I checked to see if the screw on the plate that extends over to help hold the balance wheel was tight with my little screw driver and the head of the screw came off with no effort with the rest of the screw left inside. I'm wondering if it was glued on. Oh well now I'm going to take it to someone with more brains than myself to see if the watch can be salvaged. Pity. It is a nice looking Poljot.
 
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