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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I received my MK II a few weeks ago but haven't had a chance to resize the bracelet yet. In the meantime I initially set it and then played with it a bit, enough to start the movement ticking. When it stopped a day later, I left it resting. Then, today I set it up in my watch winder and turned it on. After 10-15 turns, however, the seconds hand had not resumed moving . . .

I'm a bit confused about this behavior from the watch. I thought with an automatic, just a few turns would be enough to wind up the mainspring and get the seconds hand moving again. (The 2836 movement is, I believe, bidirectional, so it should have wound no matter what direction I set up on my winder.) I ended up picking up the watch and moving it around a bit by hand, at which point the seconds hand started moving again.

I'd appreciate input from those more knowledgeable than I. Is it normal for an automatic watch whose power reserve is fully wound down to take more than 10 turns or so in a watch winder to get going again? Or is this a sign of some sort of defect/problem with the movement?

EDIT:

This has been answered. My Nassau is working perfectly fine, I misunderstood the nature of what a watch winder does. Thanks all for the helpful replies.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I don't think a winder would always be sufficient to get a watch started once it's stopped. You'd be surprised as to how much physical activity can sometimes be required to get the seconds hand moving. I have worn a watch for a couple hours (ETA 2824-2) and it didn't start ticking until I shook it. As long as you were able to get it moving, I don't think it's anything to be concerned about.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I have found that most watches will stay wound on a winder if they are fully wound to start with. They will NOT "wind up" just from the winder motion.Winders are to maintain, not wind your watch if it's completely wound down.
Try winding it around 25 -30 turns and then put it on your winder. It should stay wound OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I have found that most watches will stay wound on a winder if they are fully wound to start with. They will NOT "wind up" just from the winder motion.Winders are to maintain, not wind your watch if it's completely wound down.
Try winding it around 25 -30 turns and then put it on your winder. It should stay wound OK.
Thanks for the reply. I'm trying to figure out how this works though. What is different about a person shaking the watch a bit and/or handwinding it vs. putting it on a winder and having it go for a few turns. Isn't the watch winder going to eventually add enough energy to the mainspring that the watch should start running again?
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I've got several watches that I've put on a winder and just the mild rotation wasn't enough to START them up. That required some, erm, manual stimulation.

I think you're confusing the action of an automatic, rotational winder with gentle shaking or "swirling" a watch in the hand. A winder is simply giving a watch rotor one, and only one, cycle per 360° rotation of the watch case. That's not much compared with the, say, 10 rotations you can give it in hand with about 5 seconds of gentle shaking. I have two kinds of winders, one that does 3 minutes of rotation then several minutes rest (adjustable cycles), and another that does a single rotation every x minutes. The latter is sufficient just to keep a watch going, and I have it on nearly the lowest repetition frequency because I put watches on it that are already wound to some level. The winder keeps them running, that's all.

I'd say that if you set the winder at the lowest setting (low repetition, minimal rotations), wear the watch for a day (6-10 hours), then put it on the winder. It should still be going 48-72 hours later. (Remember that these movements, fully wound, have a power reserve of 30-40 hours on average. Never measured the 2836 in the Kingston/Nassau models.)

I don't use a winder to "wind up" a watch, only to keep them running so that I don't have to unscrew the crown every time I put on the watch, likewise reset the date. (Watches that don't have screw down crowns, I don't feel such a great need to keep running.)
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

Thanks for the reply. I'm trying to figure out how this works though. What is different about a person shaking the watch a bit and/or handwinding it vs. putting it on a winder and having it go for a few turns. Isn't the watch winder going to eventually add enough energy to the mainspring that the watch should start running again?
I am trying to figure out how a person could start a thread with an accusatory title, Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder, without understanding the technology.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I am trying to figure out how a person could start a thread with an accusatory title, Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder, without understanding the technology.
How else would you like me to phrase the title? I was not trying to sound accusatory and I don't think others took it that way. It was potentially concerning, at least to me, because I was laboring under the misconception that a watch winder actually wound a watch up rather than just maintaining the current status of the mainspring. It's not like I said something off the wall like, "My Nassau's a piece of junk don't buy from this guy" -- precisely because I respect that Bill Yao has a great reputation on these forums, and I didn't want to overreact since I'm still fairly new to the hobby.

Thanks to all for the replies, as usual this forum has been very helpful.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

How else would you like me to phrase the title? I was not trying to sound accusatory and I don't think others took it that way. It was potentially concerning, at least to me, because I was laboring under the misconception that a watch winder actually wound a watch up rather than just maintaining the current status of the mainspring. It's not like I said something off the wall like, "My Nassau's a piece of junk don't buy from this guy" -- precisely because I respect that Bill Yao has a great reputation on these forums, and I didn't want to overreact since I'm still fairly new to the hobby.

Thanks to all for the replies, as usual this forum has been very helpful.
You could have asked a question instead of stating in the title of the post that you were having "Potentially Concerning Behavior" behavior with a small business owners product in the title of a post. If someone just reads the title they may assume there is an actual problem with the product as opposed you were "laboring under the misconception". In the end the problem was with you, not with the watch yet this thread title will be on the first page of a small business site for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

You could have asked a question instead of stating in the title of the post that you were having "Potentially Concerning Behavior" behavior with a small business owners product in the title of a post. If someone just reads the title they may assume there is an actual problem with the product as opposed you were "laboring under the misconception". In the end the problem was with you, not with the watch yet this thread title will be on the first page of a small business site for a while.
God forbid anyone read four or five posts to figure out what was going on in the thread.

I'm as puzzled by the amount of offense you're taking as you were apparently puzzled by how a person could possibly title a post the way I did. Look, imagine this were a brick-and-mortar business and I walked in and asked the question in this way -- "Hey, I've noticed some odd, potentially concerning behavior in a watch I bought from this store when I put it on a watch winder," and then explained my problem. And I did this within earshot of other potential customers. Is that such a terrible thing to do? And then imagine that someone explained to me what the helpful posters in this thread did, and I said, "Thanks, see you later." That's basically what happened here. You seem to have some vague, ill-defined fear that I'm hurting Bill's business, and that's far from my aim. What I did is not exactly reporting MK II to the Better Business Bureau for selling defective merchandise.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

We need to chill out here. I see nothing inflammatory about the title or thread contents.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

God forbid anyone read four or five posts to figure out what was going on in the thread.

I'm as puzzled by the amount of offense you're taking as you were apparently puzzled by how a person could possibly title a post the way I did. Look, imagine this were a brick-and-mortar business and I walked in and asked the question in this way -- "Hey, I've noticed some odd, potentially concerning behavior in a watch I bought from this store when I put it on a watch winder," and then explained my problem. And I did this within earshot of other potential customers. Is that such a terrible thing to do? And then imagine that someone explained to me what the helpful posters in this thread did, and I said, "Thanks, see you later." That's basically what happened here. You seem to have some vague, ill-defined fear that I'm hurting Bill's business, and that's far from my aim. What I did is not exactly reporting MK II to the Better Business Bureau for selling defective merchandise.
God forbid someone take some personal responsibility and research what they are talking about before saying a product is having concerning behavior.

Your scenario does not work. Walking in and asking a question would be to email Bill or open a ticket. What you did was stand with a sign outside the door saying you may be having a problem with a product sold there.

If I was on the fence with buying a product from two manufacturers and I saw some guy standing outside basically saying he was having concerning behavior with one of the products I probably would go with the one without the guy making accusations.

That is just my opinion.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I think the difference is that when you shake the watch, versus just rotating the watch on a winder where only the rotor turns (as a posting states earlier) causes the balance wheel to get some inertia going to it thus gets it going. The shake though seemingly gentle is much more vigorous than just rotating the watch so it gets the balance wheel going.
Just my two cents and my observations from experience.
Rich
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

As has been mentioned the gentle rocking of a winder, generally isn't enough to get things started on a completely wound down auto. The purpose of a winder is to keep things wound...

There is an edit option for the OP , if he chooses, to edit the title, as it really is no longer "a potential concern" in my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

As has been mentioned the gentle rocking of a winder, generally isn't enough to get things started on a completely wound down auto. The purpose of a winder is to keep things wound...

There is an edit option for the OP , if he chooses, to edit the title, as it really is no longer "a potential concern" in my opinion.
Agreed, and I'm happy to do so. Could you point me to it? The "Edit Post" option doesn't seem to allow editing of the title of the thread.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

Agreed, and I'm happy to do so. Could you point me to it? The "Edit Post" option doesn't seem to allow editing of the title of the thread.
Edit post #1, click "go advanced," you should see the title field.

// Tapatalk HD for Android - Nexus 7 //
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

Thank you for changing the title.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

Im good with the original title. Far too many people have realized just how good Bill's watches are...This way there are more left for me.... :)
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I've my watch winder set to 650 bidirectional turns per day (TPD), but it won't "maintain" my Stingray for more than 1 week - note that I usually manually wind the watch before putting it in the winder, typically 40-50 turns of the crown.

I imagine bumping up the TPD will solve that - I just haven't gotten around to it.

But I was curious to know what TPD settings others are using?

Thanks.

Karl.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

Thanks for fielding this question so effectively guys. I have to admit that I didn't know "household" winders were not intended to wind watches but rather to keep them wound.

I have an industrial winder that rotates at 4 RPM. I can set the number of rotations clockwise and counterclockwise per day but the instructions I have here are in French so I never go around to programming the thing. I just monitor it when I have it running.
 

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Re: Nassau - Some Odd (Potentially Concerning) Behavior on a Winder

I've my watch winder set to 650 bidirectional turns per day (TPD), but it won't "maintain" my Stingray for more than 1 week - note that I usually manually wind the watch before putting it in the winder, typically 40-50 turns of the crown.

I imagine bumping up the TPD will solve that - I just haven't gotten around to it.

But I was curious to know what TPD settings others are using?

Thanks.

Karl.
Hi Karl,

20-30 turns should be enough. As for the TPD I will have to let someone else field that one. I just wind mind when I want to wear them.

By the way just so people know when you have your watch on a winder it is wearing your watch by proxy and it will not increase the time between service intervals.

I had a couple of customers wonder why their watches needed service when they kept them on a winder.
 
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