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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need a watch that won't allow ingress of vapour. As far as I'm aware that is unheard of so I continue to look. However, I've seen a CX Swiss Seawolf (1000m) for £300 sterling. Being relatively poor, is it worth it and can I get a watch for under thousands that I can wear constantly without fear of it letting in?
 

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It might help if you could define which "vapour" you are discussing here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Steam. Temp. changes allow the air to condense on the inside of every watch I've had. I'm looking for anything that prevents this from happening. Suggestions like leaving the watch by a heat source so the vapour evaporates don't work in my experience. Any watches manufactured in a vacuum?
 

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You can look at Sinn watches ... some models have a dry capsule (copper sulfate) which absorbs moisture, and some more are also filled with Argon, significantly slowing the ingress of vapors. Also, they use Viton-type seals which seal the case much more effectively than the common Nitril seals.

Hope that helps. :)
 

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Sinn also do the EZM2, which is filled with liquid silicon. I think Bell & Ross do a Hydromax with a similar filling. Underwater glare is completely eliminated. Condensation shouldn't be a problem either. However, these are serious dive watches with serious prices.
 

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Actually, any waterproof watch rated at least 50 meters, in good shape and recently watertightness tested is also steam proof, unless you leave the crown unscrewed (if screw-down type) or in the time-setting position.
Before to buy an ultrasonic cleaning machine, I used to clean up my watches (only the waterproof ones) using steam (I am in the steam-generator business) and the result had been always perfect with no one unwelcome seepage of steam or moisture in the case of any watch.
All other solutions such as liquid silicon or Argon filling of the watch seem to me only proofs of useless technical skills, but give no any plus for ordinary daily use. Only cost a bit more everytime the watch needs to be overhauled.
About gasket materials, usually nitrilic rubber seals make an excellent job in terms of watertightness in a lot of watches, including models rated 1000 or 2000 meters. Viton or Fluoride Silicon or some other exhotic materials are really unnecessary, unless you are considering to use your watch by handling oils or petrol or at high temperature (Nitrilic rubber can withstand continuosly 150 °C, Viton can withstand 180 °C).
Regards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can look at Sinn watches ... some models have a dry capsule (copper sulfate) which absorbs moisture, and some more are also filled with Argon, significantly slowing the ingress of vapors. Also, they use Viton-type seals which seal the case much more effectively than the common Nitril seals.

Hope that helps. :)

Phenomenal. Is there anyone else that does the same and is the CX watch worth the money? Thanks for assistance
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many thanks to both. The one I currently have is 200 rated but and I don't want to believe seals have died so early ( a year or two) Any suggestions towards the CX Swiss?
 

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Many thanks to both. The one I currently have is 200 rated but and I don't want to believe seals have died so early ( a year or two) Any suggestions towards the CX Swiss?

:think: I would check if the watch is still under warranty first and I would contact the company. If the watch is still under warranty and was not misused they should provide you the overhauling for restoring its original waterproofness free of charge.
If warranty already expired, ask them for a service center or bring the watch to a (good) watchmaker for checking its watertightness, first. Its a simple test and it should be cheap. In case of any fault, it should be fully desassembled, cleaned and all the gaskets have to be replaced. Maybe some moisture entered the case and this might cause an early ageing of dial and hands and damages (corrosion) to the movement that cannot withstand any moisture :rodekaart.
The soonest you'll do the better.
About CX Swiss, no direct experience, sorry.
 

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Phenomenal. Is there anyone else that does the same and is the CX watch worth the money? Thanks for assistance
Damasko uses Viton seals as well, but not the capsule and Argon filling (the latter is less important than the capsule, btw.).
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Cheers. I've decided to go down the liquid-filled route (MTM, B&R etc.) but just found Swiss Diver Hyperbar. Can't find anything about them apart from retailers. Is this suss or are they genuinely cheaper than the aforementioned.
 

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I need a watch that won't allow ingress of vapour. As far as I'm aware that is unheard of so I continue to look. However, I've seen a CX Swiss Seawolf (1000m) for £300 sterling. Being relatively poor, is it worth it and can I get a watch for under thousands that I can wear constantly without fear of it letting in?
If a watch is water resistant to 10 (for example) atmospheres, it should be vapor resistant to the same pressure shouldn't it? I don't see that vapor would be any more searching than a liquid.
 

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The one I currently have is 200 rated but and I don't want to believe seals have died so early ( a year or two) ?
I'm intrigued... I was about to say any diver should do (or a gshock?) What watch was this?

what kind of temps (I don't think pressure is a problem with gas) can your vapour reach?
 

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If the innards are so senistive to moisture, why are there parts in there that can rust/corrode? I have a DOXA 600T that had this problem. My assumption was that for their price, surely the insides would be impervious to moisture. Such was not the case and my question is, why not? It was an expensive lesson!

paul
 

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If the innards are so senistive to moisture, why are there parts in there that can rust/corrode? I have a DOXA 600T that had this problem. My assumption was that for their price, surely the insides would be impervious to moisture. Such was not the case and my question is, why not? It was an expensive lesson!

paul
Because the the cost of making the movement out of 316 stainless would be prohibitive. And of course, the springs would still be sensitive to moisture, as the hairspring is a special temperature insensitive alloy, and mainsprings are an alloy resistant to setting.
 

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Thanks for the reason for not having corrosion resistant innards!

paul
 

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If a watch is water resistant to 10 (for example) atmospheres, it should be vapor resistant to the same pressure shouldn't it? I don't see that vapor would be any more searching than a liquid.

Actually, the effect of the temperature for saturated steam @ 10 bar would not be negligible, being the temperature close to 180 °C - 356 °F -(see the Mollier diagram: http://climeg.poliba.it/~eneapp/Materialedidattico_attachments/mollier.pdf ).

Many watch parts, including gaskets would be damaged by heat. :think:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The watches I've had trouble with have been either G-shocks or other 200m resistants. It seems that liquid-filled is the only guarantee to avoid the problem (I suppose even the best seals will eventually die but at least liquid avoids the air-tight problem)
 
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