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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, new to this forum so i apologise in advance if this is the incorrect place to put this post. Feel free to point me in the right direction.

A while ago i obtained a Raketa pilot (24H) watch. The watch kept time for about three months within a degree of accuracy without any calibration (an increase of 40-80 seconds per day). However, after one hot day (like any other) it became 4 seconds fast per minute. To fix this i sent the watch to a local watch repairer. This fixed the problem for about two weeks and it was more accurate than originally stated. However, two days of humidity resulted in it resuming its habit of being 4 seconds fast per minute. A quick search of the internet resulted meant that i had found how to change the time using two arms, i found these to not alter timekeeping to a significant level to fix the large innacuracy.

Extra information that may help - opening up the back has the text "19 Nineteen Jewels R 2609.H"

Any help/advice would be appriciated. Main questions that arise are:

Should i spend more money on sending this to a watch repairer in order to rectify this problem?

Should i purchase a watch from a reputable seller, (budget would be less than $150)?

Is this going to be a recurring problem in my environment (Hot humid days & cold wet days) and should i opt for a better sealed watch?

or

Can i fix this problem myself with some tools, a steady hand and then have the knowledge to fix this problem in the future?

Thanks in advance,
BBCXC.
 

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Hello, new to this forum so i apologise in advance if this is the incorrect place to put this post. Feel free to point me in the right direction.

A while ago i obtained a Raketa pilot (24H) watch. The watch kept time for about three months within a degree of accuracy without any calibration (an increase of 40-80 seconds per day). However, after one hot day (like any other) it became 4 seconds fast per minute. To fix this i sent the watch to a local watch repairer. This fixed the problem for about two weeks and it was more accurate than originally stated. However, two days of humidity resulted in it resuming its habit of being 4 seconds fast per minute. A quick search of the internet resulted meant that i had found how to change the time using two arms, i found these to not alter timekeeping to a significant level to fix the large innacuracy.

Extra information that may help - opening up the back has the text "19 Nineteen Jewels R 2609.H"

Any help/advice would be appriciated. Main questions that arise are:

Should i spend more money on sending this to a watch repairer in order to rectify this problem?

Should i purchase a watch from a reputable seller, (budget would be less than $150)?

Is this going to be a recurring problem in my environment (Hot humid days & cold wet days) and should i opt for a better sealed watch?

or

Can i fix this problem myself with some tools, a steady hand and then have the knowledge to fix this problem in the future?

Thanks in advance,
BBCXC.
Here's my two cents:

I doubt the weather conditions are causing your problem.

It's probably not possible to regulate a watch that is that far off with the regulator arm.

The movement appears to be a 12hr. Raketa 2609.H that has been converted to 24hr. by switching out the hour gear. An authentic 24 hr. movement should have 2623 on the bridge.

There are many reasons why a vintage watch may run fast but the classic reason is a dirty hairspring with coils sticking together effectively shortening the spring and causing it to decrease the swing of the balance wheel speeding its back and forth movement.

I would take it back to the watchmaker and ask him what he did and explain the current situation and get his advice. Maybe a simple clean/oil will put things right and he may be able to give you a price to do that.

If that's not possible or too expensive then you could decide to start a new hobby but be prepared for an investment of about $150 for tools and materials to ensure a decent chance of success.

You could go on ebay and try to buy, at a good price, a 24hr Raketa watch advertised as keeping good time but otherwise tattered and have your watchmaker swap the movements. I'd try to get a 2623 movement this time.

If your watch is in decent condition otherwise, you could go ahead and sell it on ebay to others who have the capability to service it and bring it back to life, and start over.

Good luck and welcome to the forum!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Firstly i apologise for the late reply, thanks for the the advice[schnurrp].

I've decided to purchase equipment so i can do it myself. The plan is to gain experience from this watch, and later in the year i will purchase one with a "proper" movement (2623 movement from ebay probably). Through searching on the forum i've found your [schnurrp] recommendations for a toolkit in another thread (post #19 https://www.watchuseek.com/f10/hello-got-couple-questions-about-raketa-716540-2.html)

ItemPrice
Watchmaker's Watch Case Back Opening Knife 4.5" inch
Item Number: 59.047
$4.95
Watch Tool 8 in 1 Watch Movement Holder
Item Number: 59.241
$7.95
Plastic Watch Oil Cup
Item Number: 42.106
$3.50
Moebius Synt-A-Lube (9010) Watch Oil, 2 mL
Item Number: 42.500
$29.95
Dumont High Tech Tweezers S/S Non-Magnetic 4 3/4" #3
Item Number: 57.251
$21.45
Watch Tool Watch Hand Remover
Item Number: 59.0345
$11.95
Watch Opener Waterproof Watch Case Wrench 5 1/2 inch
Item Number: 59.0793
$14.95
Plastic Dip Watch Oiler
Item Number: 42.250
$2.59
Plastic Dip Watch Oiler
Item Number: 42.256
$2.59
Color Coded Reversible Blade Replacement Screwdrivers (Sold individually)
Item Number: 52.0757

MM Size: .70mm/ Silver
$3.89
Color Coded Reversible Blade Replacement Screwdrivers (Sold individually)
Item Number: 52.0758

MM Size: .80mm/ Red
$3.89
Color Coded Reversible Blade Replacement Screwdrivers (Sold individually)
Item Number: 52.0760

MM Size: 1.00mm/ Brown
$3.89
Color Coded Reversible Blade Replacement Screwdrivers (Sold individually)
Item Number: 52.0761

MM Size: 1.20mm/ Green
$3.89
Optivisor LX Magnifier Hands Free Headband for Jewelers and Watchmakers
Item Number: 29.1473

Focus & Power: 8" inches, 2 1/2x power
$29.98
Alternatively there is this kit: https://www.watchuseek.com/f30/improved-watch-mod-maintenance-tool-kit-$62-00-usd-shipped-registered-466201.html#post3436697, which i assmume i would have to augment (assuming if it's still available) with watch oiling equipment and more screwdrivers. I also noticed both of these selections do not contain cleaning equipment such as solvents and other paraphernalia. Are these tools overkill for cleaning a dirty hairspring?

I have seen a few threads detailing people servicing their 2609 and 2623 watches. a good example is this thread Raketa 2623H service in 105 easy steps... . Is there any reading material that would assist, such as a generic service manual? (preferably not in russian :)) What is the best method of attack here?

Thanks again,
BBCXC.
 

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Good for you, BBCXC, it can be a lot of fun!

The tool kit you referenced looks pretty good but it includes several tools for working with metal bracelets which I would never use.

I believe you would be happier with a visor instead of a loupe which would add about $20 to the kit. The screwdrivers look a little small and cheap which is not good to start with. The ones I recommend are mid-grade and have enough value that they can be sold if you change direction. The scratch brush is a worthwhile addition I've never used but would like to try. There's no oil which would add anywhere from $10-$35 dollars depending on the quality.

Here's a thread from the f6 watchmaking forum that will give you about as much input as you could ever want: https://www.watchuseek.com/f6/getting-started-guide-watchmaking-tools-688276.html

Phd's "105 steps" thread is a classic, in my opinion, and is the one that got me interested in the first place. Here's the only watchmaking book that I own: Practical Watch Repairing: Donald De Carle: Amazon.com: Kindle Store

It's out-of-date regarding tools and equipment but offers some good fundamental advice about general procedures such as disassembly and cleaning. Although the detail and care suggested is much too great for me at this time (I still consider myself a beginner) there's some good advice in there. There's not much available that I've seen on technique so you just need to dive in and get your feet wet.

Amil's advice is key! First go here and buy something like this: 09 inch Set of 4 vintage watch movements van CockroachShop op Etsy and see if you can bring one of these back to life using its brothers to replace screws, springs, and parts that are beyond cleaning and/or broken or will be lost during assembly/disassembly. Keep a decent camera beside you and document your steps.

As regards cleaning, putting the parts in some 91% alcohol to soak and then cleaning with a soft brush and a final rinse before a good air-dry is the best approach to start with, in my opinion, for everything but the pallet fork which I clean with lighter fluid to keep the alcohol from dissolving the varnish used to attach the stones. Maybe some others will chime in with further recommendations.

A good fact to remember: Russian watches were designed to be assembled by hand in "factories" which were basically a lot of benches with people (often women) sitting and assembling movements all day long so with a little mechanical ability and average eyesight you should succeed.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Okay, thanks for the extra advice/material. I now plan on purchasing that book and will work on getting a toolkit together.

This might be better off in a new thread, but it's _my_ thread so hopefully no-one will mind :-!.

I'm looking at purchasing these three sets of four movements (twelve should be enough for practice yes?)

http://www.etsy.com/listing/109621158/09-inch-set-of-4-vintage-watch-movements (The one mentioned previously)

09 inch Set of 4 vintage watch movements van CockroachShop op Etsy

09 inch Set of 4 vintage watch movements van CockroachShop op Etsy


Regarding the 2609.HA & 2628.H movements, are they mostly parts compatible with the 2609.H in the mechanical watch that i have currently? The movements of the 2609.HA and 2628.H look almost identical from the back, with the only difference is the day/date on the front. The only part which would be dissimilar in my 2609.H is that it has a 24 hour gear, if my hypothesis is correct?

I'll have to post about my experiences when parts & equipment arrive haha. Thanks heaps for your advice, this forum is amazing the more i read it.

Cheers,
BBCXC.
 

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This thread's fine, imho...

12 movements is a little excessive, you will know if this is something you enjoy after one batch and can go from there...but they are cheap.

You're right about the compatibility and description of 2609 vs. 2628 except that the movement with day/date or moveable interior bezel will have/need a longer cannon pinion and minute gear (parts which receive the hands) than that on the 2609 in order to clear the added face thickness.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Awesome. I have ordered the movements (i'm working to find a local supplier of tools/consumables) and hopefully they will arrive shortly. Thanks for the help. I'll hopefully be back with good news soon haha.

Cheers,
BBCXC.
 
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