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Dear Friends, Very often we are asked if we have old catalogs to help identify old watches: Little by little we try to put online our historical catalogs. It will take time since it is a lot of work to scan them and put them online. but here is a start:

Raketa 1961: Каталог Ру��ких наручных ча�ов Ракета | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1968: Raketa watch catalogue 1968 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1975: Raketa catalogue 1975 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1977: Raketa watch catalogue 1977 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1980: Raketa catalogue 1980 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1984: Каталог РуÑ�Ñ�ких ЧаÑ�ов «Ð Ð°ÐºÐµÑ‚а» 1984 год | РуÑ�Ñ�кие чаÑ�Ñ‹: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 1998: Raketa watch factory catalogue 1998 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 2010: Каталог ро��ий�ких ча�ов RAKETA TEMPORARY COLLECTION 2010 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 2012: Raketa catalogue | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa 2015: К�Т�ЛОГ РУССКИХ Ч�СОВ Р�КЕТ�, Я�В�РЬ. 2015 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Pobeda 2015: Каталог ча�ов 2015 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
Raketa "Have your name on the dial" 2015: Каталог ро��ий�ких ча�ов Ракета Именные 2015 | Ру��кие ча�ы: Ракета / Russian Watches: Raketa
 

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Thank you ever so much for these catalogues, and for all your effort in putting them together for us. This is a hugely useful resource, which I for one will certainly be using. Very grateful to you!
 

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This is excellent news!!

Спасибо! Я с нетерпением жду встречи больше, поскольку они будут отсканированы.

Paul
 

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Looked through all of them now.

It's a shame so many of the 90s ones are missing, also they have just recycled photos in them from year to year even though changes were probably made between those years. One model I can see in 1992 and 1998, same photo. I've found an example of that model (which has a dial too unique to fake) which is in the newer case design which was being used by other models in the same 'collection' at the time. There are even recent examples of this, for example the current Copernicus standard version, there was an early one and an update. The online site is now updated so it's hard to find proof that the old even existed, but for a while the old photos were being used while the new version was shipping. I found out when I had to return mine and a different one came back as a replacement. The model number never changed.

This is why I'm having trouble with some of the franken/not franken situations. I've seen this before in another hobby I'm involved in, arcade PCB collecting. There is 'the normal type' and quite often changes were made across the production run and people start saying they have been repaired or are elaborate bootlegs. Reality: early samples, late examples put together from spares, etc. Same with console games, different print runs (cart labels, case art etc) can have differences in quality, design, sizing and again it leaves a grey area over many items.

I've seen a bunch of Raketas I would put money on being export editions aimed at tourists, and we know some exist with different logos depending on local/export, but the catalogues don't show both types. This makes it hard to tell if for example export ones had more expensive or cheaper parts. Further example a watch I've seen about 3-4 examples of which according to the printed watch manual the owner has, is a 1992 model, it's not in the 1992 catalogue though. I think your advice from the other thread about seller research is essential, a few on Etsy definitely have a lot of 'touched up' watches and mismatched language on the dials elements.
 

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Looked through all of them now.

It's a shame so many of the 90s ones are missing, also they have just recycled photos in them from year to year even though changes were probably made between those years. One model I can see in 1992 and 1998, same photo. I've found an example of that model (which has a dial too unique to fake) which is in the newer case design which was being used by other models in the same 'collection' at the time. There are even recent examples of this, for example the current Copernicus standard version, there was an early one and an update. The online site is now updated so it's hard to find proof that the old even existed, but for a while the old photos were being used while the new version was shipping. I found out when I had to return mine and a different one came back as a replacement. The model number never changed.

This is why I'm having trouble with some of the franken/not franken situations. I've seen this before in another hobby I'm involved in, arcade PCB collecting. There is 'the normal type' and quite often changes were made across the production run and people start saying they have been repaired or are elaborate bootlegs. Reality: early samples, late examples put together from spares, etc. Same with console games, different print runs (cart labels, case art etc) can have differences in quality, design, sizing and again it leaves a grey area over many items.

I've seen a bunch of Raketas I would put money on being export editions aimed at tourists, and we know some exist with different logos depending on local/export, but the catalogues don't show both types. This makes it hard to tell if for example export ones had more expensive or cheaper parts. Further example a watch I've seen about 3-4 examples of which according to the printed watch manual the owner has, is a 1992 model, it's not in the 1992 catalogue though. I think your advice from the other thread about seller research is essential, a few on Etsy definitely have a lot of 'touched up' watches and mismatched language on the dials elements.
I agree with what you are saying. There maybe some watches that get disqualified because they are different from the rest and not in catalogs. USSR watch industry was not particularly attentive to the cataloging... Zim, for example, produced a lot of watches and almost no catalogs. But the reality is ‘unless we see it in catalogs or have NOS examples with papers from respectable sources, it is a fake.’ It maybe done with genuine parts. Maybe even using the factory equipment (someone styled late at night...) but it is not an officially released watch. Same happens with watches like Rolex: parts are made in low cost locations (and stolen there). Legit watches are assembled in Switzerland and officially released. The person who stole the parts assembles the watch as well. Question: is it an authentic watch?

In the 1992, it is a totally different story. It was a tough time. Transition watches are super hard to authenticate.
 

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Checking catalogues again, there's a gap from 1998 all the way up to 2011! On my list is a calendar watch, some are somewhat easily identified. The 1991 catalogue shows (poorly, the scan is small) one with the writing style logo, silver case, blue dial and white hands, and one in the older PAKETA style with green face, gold case and gold hands. This would seem to date the logo change versions from the early 90s onwards. The ones in that newer style were definitely still manufactured in 1994 as I found one with 1994-201x years which makes sense as the calendars seem to be approximately 20 years long.

I'm also seeing a variety of "NOS" or extremely good condition ones with modern logos, and different hands with some lume in them, blue and black seem to be the common dial colours and all the cases are silver. These have calendars running into 202x and the crowns are very slightly slimmer than on the ones going into the mid-2000s. This means one ending in 2028 (the last year I can see in the photos) would have been made in the late mid 2000s, a period of time documentation seems to be totally missing for. I'm tending towards assuming that these probably are real, but I haven't found one with documentation of any kind yet. I suspect none are truly NOS, it's the latest scam to pick a really nice condition watch and say that it is, becoming as meaningless as "serviced". Yeah sure, show me the receipt...
 

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Checking catalogues again, there's a gap from 1998 all the way up to 2011! On my list is a calendar watch, some are somewhat easily identified. The 1991 catalogue shows (poorly, the scan is small) one with the writing style logo, silver case, blue dial and white hands, and one in the older PAKETA style with green face, gold case and gold hands. This would seem to date the logo change versions from the early 90s onwards. The ones in that newer style were definitely still manufactured in 1994 as I found one with 1994-201x years which makes sense as the calendars seem to be approximately 20 years long.

I'm also seeing a variety of "NOS" or extremely good condition ones with modern logos, and different hands with some lume in them, blue and black seem to be the common dial colours and all the cases are silver. These have calendars running into 202x and the crowns are very slightly slimmer than on the ones going into the mid-2000s. This means one ending in 2028 (the last year I can see in the photos) would have been made in the late mid 2000s, a period of time documentation seems to be totally missing for. I'm tending towards assuming that these probably are real, but I haven't found one with documentation of any kind yet. I suspect none are truly NOS, it's the latest scam to pick a really nice condition watch and say that it is, becoming as meaningless as "serviced". Yeah sure, show me the receipt...
Lets not forget that there is no free things in this world. To proper service a watch, even in Russia or Ukraine, one needs to pay at least 20$. Then the cost to acquire an unserviced watch. Then you want to make sole profit. So the servicing ‘for resale’ is usually ‘do as minimum as possible, wipe off immediate dirt and make the watch run’. But personally I prefer just that. The less some low pay overworked watchmaker does the better the over condition would be. There is a well known collector Alexandr Brodnikovskiy (he is on this forum as well). He loves to buy watches covered with old dirt/paint/etc. cause the dirt protects the watch. And I agree!
 
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