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Why not Titanium watches are not common compared to Stainless Steel ones?
Do you know the reasons why?

Also, is it true that most of the standard titanium bracelet of titanium watches are made out of low grade titanium?

Thanks
 

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I think a couple of factors that might sway things for the general public non-WIS:

* People want something they can recognise - ie shiny steel finish - or steel with a gold plate finish even ?

* People want weight to the watch - they might think "cheap" if they pick up a much lighter titanium when they're used the shiny steel above ?

There's probably other stuff at work too ... like price of materials for one, must be slightly dearer for Ti
 

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Yup, many people prefer the 'heft' of stainless steel.

Titanium does scratch more easily, but this is because it tends to be relatively pure titanium, not because it is of a 'low grade'. Titanium alloys can be much harder, and specialist surface treatments can make it harder still. Few manufacturers, such as Citizen, seem to have the technology or perhaps the will to surface treat their titanium watches in this way.
 

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* People want weight to the watch - they might think "cheap" if they pick up a much lighter titanium when they're used the shiny steel above ?
The weight thing is always interesting to me.
There have been times when watch x was a lighter watch and Poster A then goes to say that it being light felt like a cheap watch. Then all of a sudden, Poster A's favourite brand makes a watch out of titanium and all of a sudden, they love the lack of weight.
 

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DM said:
The weight thing is always interesting to me.
Weight is a funny thing with products in general

You've all seen someone pick something up and them say (impressed) oh it's got some weight to it! .......... well I have lol
(manufacturers/designers play with product's weight more than you think - for instance having a lump of metal 'sewn' into a telephone handset to give it a bit of "some weight to it')

and then like you say , tell them beforehand something's made of (space age lol) titanium and suddenly they're all over it... mainly cos they have very little exposure to the material I think , .... there aren't many other day to day things made of titanium are there.
 

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The lack of weight has never bothered me. But, I tend to wear my watches fairly tight, to the "I can feel it" sensation for me usually comes from the tightness of the strap, not the heft of the watch.

Titanium also tends to not be quite as nice a color as steel. It's all subjective, of course, the the more "silver-y" quality of steel is preferred by more people, I suspect.
 

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I probably would not buy a titanium watch. I like the weight of steel and a light diver feels less substantial. Additionally, titanium is much easier scratched or dented than steel and sacrificing durability for a lighter weight is not a positive tradeoff for me.
 

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Being easier to scratch makes me hesitate. I love the lighter weight though. I never understood the "heavier feels more substantial" line of thinking. I don't want to carry heavy things on me all the time. I wish there were more watches that weighed closer to nothing.
 

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Personally, I like the look (and don't mind the weight) of ti, especial with Breitlings, but what mpalmer said about scratches and dents has been true in my experience. I just don't think ti is the optimal watch case material.
 

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The answer to OP's question is the matte-ness (less bling) and the price of the material (and to process it)

Personally I love Ti material,bevause it's heft and less bling,those people who said Ti watches felt light should try to hold Seiko SBDX011 or Pam 351,they're not that flimsy light..

I have 2 similar Pam with different material (111 and 177) and I think both of them do scratch rather easily,but the shiny SS do better to hide the scratches compared to matte grey Ti

Other thing about Ti,it felt warmer even though you left your watch in a cold room overnight,no surprising cold-bite like SS..
 

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I am a metallurgist working for a long time in stainless, titanium, and other special metals.

The "grade" of titanium is related to the chemistry and strength, not the quality. As a matter of fact, for the very low grades, the more the price goes up because there has to be more controls over the impurities.

Titanium in most popular grades is similar strength to steel, but at about 1/2 the weight. The other thing is titanium is about 2x more "springy" than steel. Due to its tenacious oxide layer, it is also totally biocompatible (no titanium implant has ever been rejected) and practically immune to corrosion in oxidizing environments like sweat or seawater. This makes it a VERY good option for just about any item (well, except in reducing environments, but then no metal will last long in those conditions)

The problem is that its expensive. While Ti is the 6th most abundant material in the Earth's crust, it never exists in a pure state. A lot of work has to be performed on the ore before it can be used to make metal products from, and it is incredibly power-intensive. (Similarly to aluminum - the cone on the top of the Washington monument is made from aluminum because it was more costly than gold back in the day) ... And that just gets it to the point where it can be melted, cast, forged, machined, etc similarly to steel.

The "springiness" makes Ti a bit more unforgiving in machining and significantly harder to polish to a fine level. As mentioned above, there is also the color, which is a little more "brown" than stainless. Where polished stainless can match silver or rhodium OK, titanium will look noticeably different.
 

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Melt temp is higher than SS so it's more
difficult to cast.
Melt temp is similar to steel. That has no effect on price. The need to keep the liquid titanium isolated from air/water (liquid Ti will "steal" the oxygen atom from a water molecule, resulting in a steam explosion followed by a hydrogen explosion) adds a little to the price - more by restricting supply than by actual cost involved.

A few of the posters above have pointed out something else very interesting - the electrical and thermal conductivity of titanium is a bit lower than steel, and this does tend to make it feel a bit "warmer".
 

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There are probably a couple of reasons why steel is preferred over Ti for watches. Ti enables weeds like me to wear large watches but when a "normal" watch is made from titanium its lightness does tend to make the piece feel insubstantial and hence cheap. Secondly though Ti may be tougher than steel even matt titanium scratches more easily than steel. As for polished titanium which is "bling" match for steel I'll not even go there.
 

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A) Grade 2 is too soft and damages easily (grade 5 isn't)
B) Looks dull when unfinished (can be polished)
C) Too light for some folks
D) Cost (slightly)
E) Too warm. Ti is "warmer" than steel. Sometimes, I like the coldness of steel.
 

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I love the grade 5 titanium on my Omega PO for the following reasons:

1) harder than steel, therefore more scratch resistant
2) corrosion resistant, which makes sense on a diver (i.e. seawater)
3) lighter than steel, in fact the only way I was comfortable wearing such a large watch
4) nice looking - grade five looks very similar to steel, and polishes nicely too
 

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I believe I own all three shades of this spectrum. I have a titanium fossil that is super light. A handful of steel watches. And a tungsten carbide chronograph. I hate to say it, but I'm a victim of the weight thing. My Tungsten carbide watch is very thin, and of course very heavy. When somebody picks it up, the response is much different than most of the others. The only advantage I can see titanium with is that is hypoallergenic. And Tungsten maybe also, not sure, I'm not a dermatologist. I have no idea why Titanium is rarer as a watch material. Maybe something to do with supply/price/machining differences/etc.
 

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Pure titanium is much softer than most types of steel, so it's more scratch prone. And, most of the other grades of titanium don't compare to super steels out in the market in terms of hardness, namely those used for knives. Price is another factor.
 

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Could it be that the results are a little skewed due to the limited choices of Ti watches?

Personally, i love Ti watches. I was in a serious dilemma with my previous purchase between the WG and the Ti version.

Really really loved the lightweight of the Ti and i think it made the most sense as a sports/casual watch.

Alas, the polished look of the WG won me over in the end.

I would say the brushed finish of the Ti would limit options somewhat.
 
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