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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Afternoon,

I'm currently working on an overhaul of my Rolex trench watch, working in the confines of a watchmaking class, and last night the instructor and I were trying to find info on the movement itself [looking to replace a set mainspring]. Using a Bestfit catalog we had no luck looking in the Rolex section....What were we doing wrong?

Is there a place that has the nuts and bolts info on these movements [caliber numbers, etc etc]?

Thanks in advance!
 

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I've worked on several of these, they are made by the Aegler company which was owned by Gruen, Rolex, and Aegler itself. They may not come up as being 'Rolex' movts, because they are identical to the ones used in Unicorn, Gruen, etc. If I remember correctly, the calibre was 300 or 500, but don't quote me. Anyway, when faced with replacing a set mainspring in something a bit out of the ordinary, we always just measure its width, length, and thickness, and try a match using that criteria. Our mainsprings are all sorted with this info clearly written on the outside, as well as what the original maker and cal. was. Here is something I got from the web, but I lost the source, so pardon me if I don't identify where it came from, it may even be a Rolex resource:

Since the beginning, Rolex used Aegler’s movements , so the firsts ones were powered by jewelled lever movements from Jean Aegler’s factory placed on Rebberg street which later gave the name to the movement. Rebberg movement was introduced in the early years of this century and was initially available with both lever and cylinder escapements.
In 1912, Hans Wilsdorf convinced of the imminent arrival of the wristwatch, gave Hermann Aegler the largest order the firm had ever received. The Rebberg was produced in two different grades, 15 and 7 jewels. The “Rolex 15 Jewels” model featured an all over machined finished to the plates and featured a main winding wheel.
Later, the Rebberg movement was replaced for the Hunter one which production would run almost twice as long. It was first introduced in 1923 in a 10 – ½” size not being recognizable to most of the people because the center wheel bridge is completely different from the later, a more common version. All Hunter movements have a polished rhodium finish. The initial version of the 10 – ½” Hunter was made in 3 different grades: Prima, Extra Prima and Ultra Prima; all of them with 15 jewel movements. The Hunter was the first Rolex movement capable of being timed to chronometer precision. These, were 16, 17 or 18 jewel movements with capped escape jewels, and always had a “Chronometer” sign on its dial.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What a wealth of information, I was aware of the Aegler connection but wasn't aware of who else they worked with. We did just that for our mainspring, using a dennison gauge, and a digital caliper measured the spring and I wrote down the info for an order...Luckily my instructor is a former Rolex certified watchmaker and I trust his judgement and ability to get a proper mainspring, if he doesn't already have one at his shop

Again, thank you for the information!
 
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