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If it's like Trior, you apply the tip of the tool to the spring and turn it until the little nibs on the loops are moved to the open areas - i.e. no longer held by the housing - then remove the tool and pick up the spring with your tweezers, trying really dang hard not to tweezersnap the stupid thing into next week.

I generally put them in the small, screw-top basket with the jewels to run through the cleaner.
 

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If you don't have the tool then you can remove them easily with two pairs of tweezers. Use the (closed) tips with the tweezers diametrically opposite each other to turn it by pressing against the inside shoulders.

You can also refit them (carefully!) the same way, but that's a little bit more tricky because you have to depress the last "corner" into the recess at the same time as turning it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
You can also make a tool for these in a few minutes. Use some peg wood and taper the end diameter so it's the right OD, and use a small drill to create a recess in the tip - works like a charm...
I found a couple of Bulova 11afc plates in the spares draw with same springs so I'll make one up and have a practice. Thanks
 

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Although the image is a bit out of focus, this spring appears to be a KIF Flector. It is different from the KIF Trior in that it is a captive spring. There is only one tab to be released. Opposite the tab, the spring is hinged on a circular wire retainer which allows the spring to swing up, but it cannot get away. In order to release, the spring is turned until the tab comes to the opening in the setting. The hinge slides along the retaining wire.

The Flector is one of the easier springs we have to deal with. It is simple to release and refit, and the chances of it flying away are almost zero.

James Sadilek -- ccwatchmaker
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Your absolutely right James,
I practiced on the 11afc using Archers idea (works great) and thought initially it was jammed at one corner then realised I could swing it up. I could see the wire it is attached to in the Tudor under magnification. Here is the opened 11afc.
Gear Bicycle part Auto part Machine Metal
 
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