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Hello,

I recently pulled the trigger and purchased a vintage seamaster for my grandfather for the holidays. I started doing research the past couple months on vintage Omegas, as I wanted to get my grandfather a gift he would truly appreciate.

I ended up purchasing an early 1950s Seamaster with Omega 17 jewel cal.354 bumper automatic wind movement, a honeycomb dial, and a steel case with beefy lugs. The dial has been cleaned, but still retains that classic look.



As I only have several months research and appreciation under my belt, it would be fantastic if the community could give their thoughts, opinions, recommendations, and analysis of the piece based on the pictures below (whether good or bad).

I would like to present the gift whilst having an broadened perspective.


Much appreciated.

Watch 1.jpg Watch 2.jpg Watch 3.jpg Watch 4.jpg
 

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Hi there,

the redial is faily done, but not perfect. The minute chapter circle is not perfectly aligned to the hour markers. The short minute hand indicates that tha dial actually had this inner minute chapter circle, but it is a bit too small. In these models Omega cared that the minute hand ends near this circle, but doesn't overlap it, like in these two examples:



However, the dial looks better then most redials, and finally it can be made better any time in the future.

An original crown (like in the pics above) is still available, and the still visible Seamaster signature on the back shows that the watch wasn't excessively worn.

All in all a nice item, if the (not shown) movement is in decent shape. Unfortunately the pink-gold plating is sensitive - especially from the time periode of the bumper movements.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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As I was looking at the OP's watch and admiring the honeycomb dial, I was struck by how close the Omega symbol was to the word 'Omega'. Looking at Dr Ranfft's 2 examples, the distance seems a wee bit further apart, and the symbol a touch higher.

Could I ask Dr Ranfft (or any of the other experts) : is this closeness in the OP's watch another subtle indicator that it's a redial? Or did Omega ship out watches with very slightly different distances?

I ask this out of curiousity, as I'm well aware that the distances involved are fractions of a millimetre. Thanks!
 

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I think that you have great taste...It is an excellent and thoughtful gift. I have one of the same period (1952) and enjoy wearing it frequently. Sorry I can't add more in the way of information...
 
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