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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A while ago, I had written my first impressions of the watch in question, which was gifted to me by my fiancée's father, as me and she are getting married in May. As I had written back then, I don't consider myself a "true" watch collector, because, despite my love for well-designed and well-made timepieces, I'm not the sort of person who would make the purchase of yet another watch a priority. Plus, given the lack of necessity for tourbillons (while they're great to have in a pocket watch, they offer no real benefit in terms of accuracy to a wristwatch) I don't care about haute horlogererie that much: I have no time for, or interest in, incredibly complicated, fragile, $50,000 watches whose regular servicing costs about as much as a bespoke suit. If you do have the sort of money required for such watches, power to you and don't let me stop you from buying such a watch, but all the decorations and complications will be simply lost on me, as I think of them as too showy for my tastes.

IMG_20170322_173125.jpg

I prefer what I call the companion watch, which is, at least in my book, different from the "beater" watch; the companion watch, which may very well be a gift from a loved one or a watch you bought on a very important occasion of your life (such circumstances can give it additional sentimental value), can be a dress watch or an elegant sports watch or a chronograph, as long as it pairs equally well with a smart casual or a formal outfit, and is your "go-to" watch, but you always cherish it, care for it and protect it. The "beater", on the other hand, is the watch that you wear while washing the car, walking the dog, working out etc.; it's durable, reliable, cheap, maintenance-free, and you won't feel bad if it gets scratched or dented while in use.

IMG_20170322_173304.jpg

So, after this introduction, let's talk about the watch at hand. It's the 35 mm stainless steel version (ref. L1.611.4.75.2), water resistant to a typical 3 atmospheres (30 meters), and its movement is an Elaboré grade ETA 2824-2, which Longines calls "L633.5", with Incabloc shock protection and nickel balance wheel. It's a respectable, reliable and highly accurate movement, with considerable, if overlooked, pedigree (it traces its roots to the pioneering firm Eterna), which has stood the test of time very well and has established itself as a true workhorse for numerous watch brands. It's quite daring for Longines to produce a 35mm men's watch these days, when the trend is still for comically oversized cases that make them exceedingly heavy and utterly unwearable for people with slender wrists - here's looking at you, Breitling and Panerai. And the fact that the watch has a hesalite (PMMA-HT acrylic) crystal is, as I've seen in several forums, somewhat controversial: nowadays, everyone seems to think that the only way to go is sapphire, and that acrylic gets scratched the moment you look at it. Yet, to me, these deliberate design decisions by Longines are among the ones that make it work.

IMG_20170323_013932.jpg

Nowadays, there is a trend for "retro" watches; these can be commemorative, anniversary production runs (which are, quite understandably, limited runs), or regular production models for a wider audience, created by their original manufacturers. Or, they can be homages, whose quality and elegance depend largely on how fastidious the manufacturer is. Sadly, despite the honorable intention of the manufacturers to produce watches with styling informed by landmark timepieces of the past, far too many of these "retro" watches fail miserably. For starters, they are usually way too big. Then, they often use wrong typefaces and/or wrong texts on the dials and casebacks. Or their dials don't look convincingly faithful to the originals. That's not to say they're not good watches, but they just end up looking like well-intentioned, but ultimately average homages instead of the "real thing". See Breitling's current Transocean, which is ridiculously oversized at 43 mm, and compare it to the 35 mm original. The modern version simply doesn't work aesthetically.

IMG_20170322_173453.jpg

Refreshingly, Longines has chosen to avoid these pitfalls. They have kept the correct dimensions - and if you think your 80 kg, 180 cm tall frame gives you wrists that are too large for a vintage-sized 35 mm case, try one on and you'll see how well it really works on you and how well it blends with a business suit. They have used the exact same typeface that was featured on the 1954 original, and even the "LONGiNES" spelling of the brand name on the beautiful enamel medal on the (again, faithful to the original) case back is absolutely spot-on. The yellow gold markers and dauphin hands are also spot-on, and the superbly legible sunburst silver dial conspires with the distortion from the Hesalite crystal to play marvelously with the light that falls on the watch; it even seems to take on a warmer or cooler color, depending on the light's temperature and the angle at which the light falls on the dial.

IMG_20170323_014022.jpg

There are, however, a few departures from the original design; the brushed track on the dial between the markers, which was reproduced in the limited 1954-2014 anniversary version, is not there. And the watch also has a date complication at 12 o'clock. Some people don't like it, as only certain versions of the original had a date complication, and they had it at the 3 o'clock position, and nearer to the center; others do, and I personally find it well-placed and useful. The markers, although they are yellow gold (a color that I don't really care about), end up working really well with the watch under practically all lighting conditions, and really enhance the watch's elegant appeal. Furthermore, where the original had a crocodile or alligator strap, this one has a high-quality, lightly padded black calf strap, 18 mm wide at the lugs, which has a beautiful tactile feel, but seems a bit featureless and bland. And, finally, the movement: The original Conquest had Longines' in-house 19AS automatic movement, while the current reissue has the "boring" ETA 2824-2.

Purists might perhaps chastise Longines for not sourcing new old stock 19AS movements or, failing to find such units in their storage facilities, reproducing them, but that would have sent the development cost through the roof, and guess how much buyers would have to pay for the Heritage version? Exactly. Furthermore, I'm not sure the old 19-jewel movement performs as well as the 2824-2 in terms of accuracy. Plus, the 2824-2 is a movement every watch repairman worth his salt is familiar with and knows how to service and repair, should need arise.

IMG_20170322_173304.jpg

Now that I've owned the watch for a bit more than a month, I can speak with greater ease about my experience of owning and wearing it. First of all, I'll talk about the size: I've got thin wrists, so anything above 40 mm is a no-go for me. The Conquest Heritage, as I wrote in my first post, sits comfortably on my slender wrist and doesn't "get in the way". It simply adorns and enhances whatever outfit I use it with instead of being "showy". It does stand out, it attracts attention, but it does so because it's elegant and finely-crafted; it has this aura of effortless class. Also, while it is very well-made, it doesn't feel too heavy at all.

The acrylic crystal isn't the "scratch magnet" forum dwellers would have you think it is. Yes, it will get scratched if you start knocking the watch on hard things, but, seriously, why would you? Such incidents could very well damage the movement itself. I can't imagine someone whose job is to work in an office getting the dial scratched while working. And I can't imagine how you'd get it scratched in a restaurant or a reputable bar. But even if you do scratch the dial, minor scratches can be polished away, and acrylic crystals are cheaper to replace than sapphire ones. And, of course, there's a certain, soft, warm, vintage look, that sapphire crystals just can't replicate.

As for the accuracy of the "ordinary" Elaboré-grade 2824, it keeps great time, thank you very much. And I can rest my head knowing that, when I need to have it serviced, I'll have access to many qualified, experienced people who will know how to work on it, and I'll have it back on my wrist soon. Can you say the same about an über-complicated $100K watch?

When it comes to "bang for buck", I must say the Conquest Heritage is a lot of watch for its suggested retail price of EUR1,040 (for the stainless steel version). It feels great on the hand, it looks great, keeps great time, has a very solid, reliable and accurate movement, looks very true to the original, works well with just about any smart casual or formal outfit, and is very, very well-made. What's not to like?

Add to that the excellent product support that Longines offers, with its meticulous archiving facility and the downloadable instruction manuals, which are also translated in a wide variety of languages, Greek (my native language) included. Once again, I'll say I'm really happy with this watch; I'll be wearing it proudly on my wedding day, and I'll proudly pass it on to my children.

Then again... Are there things I would have done differently if I were a decision-maker at Longines? Hmmm... Interesting question. As a matter of fact, I can think of a few. First of all, I'd use an alligator strap, and I'd offer it in black or brown, perhaps even bundling both colors in the box, along with a two-button deployant clasp in case the owner prefers to use one. Second, I'd consider upgrading the design to use a Top-grade 2824-2 or the L619 caliber, which is based on the ETA 2892-A2; preferably using the Top grade, with the glucydur balance wheel, Nivaflex NM mainspring and Anachron hairspring. These changes might perhaps raise the price to EUR 2,000 or more, although I really believe that simply changing to the Elaboré-grade L619 calibre wouldn't measurably affect the retail price, as the prices for 2824-2 and 2892-A2 movements of the same grades are almost the same - from a quick search I was able to see that the 2892-A2 retails for about $5 more, a difference which is almost negligible in a mass-production context, where the watch manufacturer would procure this movement in the thousands.
 

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Great write-up. I bought one of these last week, only disappointment is it gains about 11 sec/day (position doesn't matter) but it's within the Longines spec (+15sec/day). Outside of that I love it. I wish more watches were this size or at least closer to it in size.

If there's one change I'd make is adding the brushed track between the hour markers but if they did that, the special edition wouldn't have a reason to exist, right? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Two factors I can think for this inaccuracy (mine is at less than +1 sec/day with the dial facing up; that's what Hairspring comes up with) are magnetism and a need for adjustment. I recommend taking it to your retailer to have it checked; if you bought it new, it's under warranty, and the Elaboré-grade 2824 is perfectly capable of excellent accuracy. I don't see why you shouldn't enjoy its full performance potential. When you do get it checked, I'd like to read what results you got!
 

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Excellent review.I felt the same way about the watch.

This watch was in my short list to purchase but hesitated for 2 reasons. First, I have read accounts of owners enamelled medalion coming loose. It would just fall off. Luckily it was within the warranty period.

Leading to the second reason, Longines came out with their 2017 Flagship Heritage at 38.5 with no date. Caseback has the flagship embossed and not pasted as in previous models. Immediately fell in love with it. Just hoping I can get this watch (1959 were made if I'm not mistaken).

But overall, the Longines Conquest Heritage is for me an heirloom watch to pass on to your children.

Congratulations.

Cheers.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you. I don't really have any worries regarding the medallion falling off. If it were ever to come off, I'd ask them to repair the caseback rather than replace it or the watch itself. As for the date window, its placement doesn't annoy me; it's in a place where my gaze falls naturally - perhaps more naturally than if it were in the traditional 3 or 6 o'clock position, and the date complication is nice to have. Finally, regarding the Flagship Heritage... Well, it's not an either/or choice between it and the Conquest. It's not a watch I'd get instead of the Conquest. It's a watch I want to get in addition to my Conquest.
 

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Hello Epicurus!

If you are still monitoring and find this addition to the thread I'll be happy.

First, thanks so much for taking the time to write a comprehensive review. During a sleepless bout last night, trolling eBay for watches I'd perhaps forgotten, I found the L1.611.4.75.2 you discuss here, and remembered reading about the limited edition (w/o date) on the Hodinkee site shortly after it came out. Then, a search or two later, your thoughtful review. I, too, like the date-at-12, and feel it makes the watch so much more practical. The "original" would work beautifully as a dress watch, but this model would more practically suit daily wear.

But it was your use (coining?) of the term "companion watch" that really caught my eye. What a perfect descriptor! I have a "beater" in my collection (my Seiko Alpinist) which gets quite a lot of wear now that I'm retired as I'm always fixing something around the house—and actually, the house is a far more dangerous place for watches than the office, imho. But I've been looking for the companion you speak of, and just having a term so perfectly define the goal is immensely helpful.

Should I ultimately decide to go for one of these, it'll be due in substantial part, to your time and imagination. Thanks so much, and… Why not write a "one year out" update?

All best wishes for 2018,

Fred Halgedahl
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi everyone, and I apologize for not having revisited this thread in quite a while. Other obligations took hold, and I had to tend to them.

I expect to give you all an update on what owning the L1.611.4.75.2 is like sometime next month. Watch this space, and thank you all for your kind words.
 

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Hi

That’s lovely time piece.. Vintage and Classy …..fantastic review and pics too.

Based on the you view , I have recently purchase Longines Heritage Conquest watch.

I am not happy with the quality and look of the leather strap, would like to get Alligator strap for my watch.

Can anyone on suggest any better option (the lug width is 18mm), may be online stores etc

Waiting for long term review of your watch..

Thanks and regards

Vinod R. Mhetar
 

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Thank you for the Review, it helped me make up my mind about buying this Watch.
I also like the Date Feature being at 12 o'clock, and the 35mm case is perfect for my 6.25 inch wrist.
My daily 'Beater' is a Citizen Fugu NY0083-14X, but the Longines is definitely my 'go to' Watch for social occasions.
 

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Two factors I can think for this inaccuracy (mine is at less than +1 sec/day with the dial facing up; that's what Hairspring comes up with) are magnetism and a need for adjustment. I recommend taking it to your retailer to have it checked; if you bought it new, it's under warranty, and the Elaboré-grade 2824 is perfectly capable of excellent accuracy. I don't see why you shouldn't enjoy its full performance potential. When you do get it checked, I'd like to read what results you got!
My new Heritage 35 mm WAS plus 9 S/D. I actually decided too buy this Longines as opposed to the ones with the snap on backs because I prefer to own a watch that I can easily remove the back myself and regulate myself.
Which I did after I had a watch repairman first loosen the back so I can then unscrew and replace using the inflatable rubber ball that I bought on eBay. Since I never get this watch wet - that is what my Hydro Conquest is for - the back doesn't need to be supper tight like when It left the Longines factory.
Oh, by the way, after only one episode at regulating the L633.5 movement and checking on my Timegrapher it now gains 1 S/D no matter how I wear it.
 

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I had bought one of these when they were first re-introduced several years ago. But, it so happened that at the time I was also more infatuated with the larger fashion dive watches and gave this first one to my young niece which she
soon trashed like everything else I ever gave her.
But, all is not lost. Last week, 12 Aug 2019 I was just passing by my local Longines counter at the local mall and I saw another back in the corner of the display counter languishing like a lost soul.
I wiped out my ATM card and made this beauty mine. Will keep this one.
 

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Hi Epicurus, your review convinced me to buy this Watch, are you still happy with yours?

My only concern about my watch is the noise of the Rotor spinning, it seems to be a tad on the noisy side when held near the ear. In comparison, I have 3 Automatic Citizen Divers that are a lot quieter than the Longines. I'm thinking of taking it back to the AD if this Rotor noise is not normal?
 

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I had a watch repairman first loosen the back so I can then unscrew and replace using the inflatable rubber ball that I bought on eBay.
Thanks for that information billiybop, I wasn't certain if my Watch had a screw in back or a 'pop off'. Now that I know it is Screw In I can get the back off and check my noisy Rotor!
 

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Great review! Do you have the lug to lug measurement?

Thank you :)
 

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A while ago, I had written my first impressions of the watch in question, which was gifted to me by my fiancée's father, as me and she are getting married in May. As I had written back then, I don't consider myself a "true" watch collector, because, despite my love for well-designed and well-made timepieces, I'm not the sort of person who would make the purchase of yet another watch a priority. Plus, given the lack of necessity for tourbillons (while they're great to have in a pocket watch, they offer no real benefit in terms of accuracy to a wristwatch) I don't care about haute horlogererie that much: I have no time for, or interest in, incredibly complicated, fragile, $50,000 watches whose regular servicing costs about as much as a bespoke suit. If you do have the sort of money required for such watches, power to you and don't let me stop you from buying such a watch, but all the decorations and complications will be simply lost on me, as I think of them as too showy for my tastes.

View attachment 11607202

I prefer what I call the companion watch, which is, at least in my book, different from the "beater" watch; the companion watch, which may very well be a gift from a loved one or a watch you bought on a very important occasion of your life (such circumstances can give it additional sentimental value), can be a dress watch or an elegant sports watch or a chronograph, as long as it pairs equally well with a smart casual or a formal outfit, and is your "go-to" watch, but you always cherish it, care for it and protect it. The "beater", on the other hand, is the watch that you wear while washing the car, walking the dog, working out etc.; it's durable, reliable, cheap, maintenance-free, and you won't feel bad if it gets scratched or dented while in use.

View attachment 11607306

So, after this introduction, let's talk about the watch at hand. It's the 35 mm stainless steel version (ref. L1.611.4.75.2), water resistant to a typical 3 atmospheres (30 meters), and its movement is an Elaboré grade ETA 2824-2, which Longines calls "L633.5", with Incabloc shock protection and nickel balance wheel. It's a respectable, reliable and highly accurate movement, with considerable, if overlooked, pedigree (it traces its roots to the pioneering firm Eterna), which has stood the test of time very well and has established itself as a true workhorse for numerous watch brands. It's quite daring for Longines to produce a 35mm men's watch these days, when the trend is still for comically oversized cases that make them exceedingly heavy and utterly unwearable for people with slender wrists - here's looking at you, Breitling and Panerai. And the fact that the watch has a hesalite (PMMA-HT acrylic) crystal is, as I've seen in several forums, somewhat controversial: nowadays, everyone seems to think that the only way to go is sapphire, and that acrylic gets scratched the moment you look at it. Yet, to me, these deliberate design decisions by Longines are among the ones that make it work.

View attachment 11607138

Nowadays, there is a trend for "retro" watches; these can be commemorative, anniversary production runs (which are, quite understandably, limited runs), or regular production models for a wider audience, created by their original manufacturers. Or, they can be homages, whose quality and elegance depend largely on how fastidious the manufacturer is. Sadly, despite the honorable intention of the manufacturers to produce watches with styling informed by landmark timepieces of the past, far too many of these "retro" watches fail miserably. For starters, they are usually way too big. Then, they often use wrong typefaces and/or wrong texts on the dials and casebacks. Or their dials don't look convincingly faithful to the originals. That's not to say they're not good watches, but they just end up looking like well-intentioned, but ultimately average homages instead of the "real thing". See Breitling's current Transocean, which is ridiculously oversized at 43 mm, and compare it to the 35 mm original. The modern version simply doesn't work aesthetically.

View attachment 11607338

Refreshingly, Longines has chosen to avoid these pitfalls. They have kept the correct dimensions - and if you think your 80 kg, 180 cm tall frame gives you wrists that are too large for a vintage-sized 35 mm case, try one on and you'll see how well it really works on you and how well it blends with a business suit. They have used the exact same typeface that was featured on the 1954 original, and even the "LONGiNES" spelling of the brand name on the beautiful enamel medal on the (again, faithful to the original) case back is absolutely spot-on. The yellow gold markers and dauphin hands are also spot-on, and the superbly legible sunburst silver dial conspires with the distortion from the Hesalite crystal to play marvelously with the light that falls on the watch; it even seems to take on a warmer or cooler color, depending on the light's temperature and the angle at which the light falls on the dial.

View attachment 11607354

There are, however, a few departures from the original design; the brushed track on the dial between the markers, which was reproduced in the limited 1954-2014 anniversary version, is not there. And the watch also has a date complication at 12 o'clock. Some people don't like it, as only certain versions of the original had a date complication, and they had it at the 3 o'clock position, and nearer to the center; others do, and I personally find it well-placed and useful. The markers, although they are yellow gold (a color that I don't really care about), end up working really well with the watch under practically all lighting conditions, and really enhance the watch's elegant appeal. Furthermore, where the original had a crocodile or alligator strap, this one has a high-quality, lightly padded black calf strap, 18 mm wide at the lugs, which has a beautiful tactile feel, but seems a bit featureless and bland. And, finally, the movement: The original Conquest had Longines' in-house 19AS automatic movement, while the current reissue has the "boring" ETA 2824-2.

Purists might perhaps chastise Longines for not sourcing new old stock 19AS movements or, failing to find such units in their storage facilities, reproducing them, but that would have sent the development cost through the roof, and guess how much buyers would have to pay for the Heritage version? Exactly. Furthermore, I'm not sure the old 19-jewel movement performs as well as the 2824-2 in terms of accuracy. Plus, the 2824-2 is a movement every watch repairman worth his salt is familiar with and knows how to service and repair, should need arise.

View attachment 11607306

Now that I've owned the watch for a bit more than a month, I can speak with greater ease about my experience of owning and wearing it. First of all, I'll talk about the size: I've got thin wrists, so anything above 40 mm is a no-go for me. The Conquest Heritage, as I wrote in my first post, sits comfortably on my slender wrist and doesn't "get in the way". It simply adorns and enhances whatever outfit I use it with instead of being "showy". It does stand out, it attracts attention, but it does so because it's elegant and finely-crafted; it has this aura of effortless class. Also, while it is very well-made, it doesn't feel too heavy at all.

The acrylic crystal isn't the "scratch magnet" forum dwellers would have you think it is. Yes, it will get scratched if you start knocking the watch on hard things, but, seriously, why would you? Such incidents could very well damage the movement itself. I can't imagine someone whose job is to work in an office getting the dial scratched while working. And I can't imagine how you'd get it scratched in a restaurant or a reputable bar. But even if you do scratch the dial, minor scratches can be polished away, and acrylic crystals are cheaper to replace than sapphire ones. And, of course, there's a certain, soft, warm, vintage look, that sapphire crystals just can't replicate.

As for the accuracy of the "ordinary" Elaboré-grade 2824, it keeps great time, thank you very much. And I can rest my head knowing that, when I need to have it serviced, I'll have access to many qualified, experienced people who will know how to work on it, and I'll have it back on my wrist soon. Can you say the same about an über-complicated $100K watch?

When it comes to "bang for buck", I must say the Conquest Heritage is a lot of watch for its suggested retail price of EUR1,040 (for the stainless steel version). It feels great on the hand, it looks great, keeps great time, has a very solid, reliable and accurate movement, looks very true to the original, works well with just about any smart casual or formal outfit, and is very, very well-made. What's not to like?

Add to that the excellent product support that Longines offers, with its meticulous archiving facility and the downloadable instruction manuals, which are also translated in a wide variety of languages, Greek (my native language) included. Once again, I'll say I'm really happy with this watch; I'll be wearing it proudly on my wedding day, and I'll proudly pass it on to my children.

Then again... Are there things I would have done differently if I were a decision-maker at Longines? Hmmm... Interesting question. As a matter of fact, I can think of a few. First of all, I'd use an alligator strap, and I'd offer it in black or brown, perhaps even bundling both colors in the box, along with a two-button deployant clasp in case the owner prefers to use one. Second, I'd consider upgrading the design to use a Top-grade 2824-2 or the L619 caliber, which is based on the ETA 2892-A2; preferably using the Top grade, with the glucydur balance wheel, Nivaflex NM mainspring and Anachron hairspring. These changes might perhaps raise the price to EUR 2,000 or more, although I really believe that simply changing to the Elaboré-grade L619 calibre wouldn't measurably affect the retail price, as the prices for 2824-2 and 2892-A2 movements of the same grades are almost the same - from a quick search I was able to see that the 2892-A2 retails for about $5 more, a difference which is almost negligible in a mass-production context, where the watch manufacturer would procure this movement in the thousands.
Excellent review and thank you for taking the time to write this. I know it's an older thread but just stumbling upon it now, looking for my next Longines and decided to look up details on my Longines Heritage Conquest - because, you know that's what we do in this crazy hobby.

I bought my Heritage Conquest over 4 years ago while on vacation in Italy... Over the last 12 years of watch collecting, I've gone through a dozen modern Omegas, Rolex, Tag, Hamiltons, etc., yet this Longines remains in my collection. My friends and family say I'm an "old soul" and for me, the Heritage Conquest checks so many boxes for me, which includes:

- Small diameter at 35mm, as you see in my signature, I only own 35 or 36mm watches right no
- Reliable movement that can be serviced by virtually any competent watchmaker
- Dimensions and aesthetics true to a vintage watch
- Versatile enough to be worn on brown or black leather

I put this on a brown leather strap from almost the day I bought it so the OEM black leather strap is in perfect condition still - I only recently put it back on black. I work in finance so my attire is either business casual or full suit, but even with a t-shirt and jeans this watch feels appropriate.

I've never timed mine but I'll do so next time it is in rotation; likely next week since I like to wear my watches for 2 weeks at a time.

Anyways, this was my first Longines and not my last. Up next is either the Avigation BigEye or Master Collection Moonphase (2019 release).
 
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