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most interested in the altimeter feature of the 9200 riseman for use in my car and hiking. is the altimeter accurate at all in the cabin of a moving vehicle either with the windows up or down?

i have heard mixed reports on the accuracy of the altimeter as well as the barometer but have also read they can be calibrated.

what do you guys think? i really like the looks of the 9200 MS but for real world use should i just go with a protrek or pathfinder? they are a little more but i don't want to spend the $160+ on a riseman and be disappointed with it's features.
 

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The riseman is great but the altimeter is the least accurate function on the watch.My baro/thermo are always spot on temp reading off wrist.The altimeter reading is based off air pressure so from inside a car to outside will change drastically,but after being outside for a short time or if a reference point is set it usually will be pretty
accurate.When i was at the beach for while with my riseman it read 0ft that was cool!!
 

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the readings have not been very accurate for me no matter how many times I calibrate the readings. This watch has been disappointing in that regard.

every time I press the red button I feel so horrible about my watch.
 

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Hmm, my GW-9200 seems always spot on, like the DW-9100 model. Only thing you need to do is calibrate before leaving. On the other side, don't have airco in my car, which might help. At our holiday, we started from 200m and we came back on 200m (+/- 5m) when we returned. All you need is normal quiet weather I'll guess.



I used mine
during my vacation in the Belgian Ardennes as you can see when following the link.

Cheers,

Sjors


 

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Keep in mind that these are few-hundred-dollar watches. They will not be super accurate except for the time. Not to be used for professional purposes. If they're at all close, thank your stars. Most of the features are... well I got hammered for using the word "gimmicks" in another thread.. so let's say they are "optimistic" about their own capabilities.
 

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Altimeter drift is inevitable, due to barometric pressure changes. Just place your riseman on your wrist and sit at home and watch the altitude fluctuate....

I'm a big fan of G-shocks but I can't recommend the Riseman for its altimeter.
 

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Keep in mind that these are few-hundred-dollar watches. They will not be super accurate except for the time. Not to be used for professional purposes. If they're at all close, thank your stars. Most of the features are... well I got hammered for using the word "gimmicks" in another thread.. so let's say they are "optimistic" about their own capabilities.
Well, you can buy the most expensive altimeter on the market, it won't to any good either if the essential technique is not incorporated. Money got nothing to do with it, basically any other manufactuerer of ABC watches does a significant better job than Casio, when it comes to altimeter/barometer accuracy. The four major points where Casio always fails is the lack of sea level pressue (SLP), thermo compensation, an altimeter lock and 1 meter increments (minor).

time4d said:
Altimeter drift is inevitable, due to barometric pressure changes. Just place your riseman on your wrist and sit at home and watch the altitude fluctuate....
With an altimeter lock, drifts are simply history. I can sit with my Tech4o and have a Tornado blasting my surrounding away, and the altimeter won't move one single meter. But you are right - sit there with your Riseman and watch your altitude miraculous rising to Mount Everest heights when the Tornado approaches...;-)


cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ZOMBIE THREAAD!!

haha, thanks for the reply's. i've found i have to adjust my riseman every time i wear it but once i do the first time of the day it's pretty solid the rest of the day. haven't payed attention on any long trips with it but around town at 45mph with the windows down it does appear to accurately register ascent/descent across large hills and from one side of the county to the other which is sort of nifty.
 

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As an avid mountainbiker the Riseman is my watch to go. Tell you what : this is a true outdoor watch,the more it stays outside the more the altimeter gets precise.
 

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Well, you can buy the most expensive altimeter on the market, it won't to any good either if the essential technique is not incorporated. Money got nothing to do with it, basically any other manufactuerer of ABC watches does a significant better job than Casio, when it comes to altimeter/barometer accuracy. The four major points where Casio always fails is the lack of sea level pressue (SLP), thermo compensation, an altimeter lock and 1 meter increments (minor).
I disagree with that. I have several altimeters, some as part of watches and some standalone, and the Casio altimeter watches are competent altimeters. Not the best of the bunch by any means, but certainly usable and reasonably accurate. To take your Casio "failures" in order:

Sea level pressure:
Yes, the Casio does not provide barometric pressure reduced to sea level. Neither do some other decent altimeters, including the Silva/Brunton ADC Summit, which is notable for its 0.1 mb pressure resolution and 1 m altitude resolution. If you use an altimeter in an environment where sea level pressure is important (aviation, weather forecasting) you obviously want an altimeter with that feature. But for measuring altitude while mountain hiking, I just don't need the feature.

Thermo compensation:
I've moved my cheap SGW-300H from refrigerator to wrist and had essentially no change in barometer or altimeter reading. And I would normally leave the watch on my wrist while using it, which keeps the temperature range narrower than that. This model, at least, seem to have no temperature compensation problems. What watch did you try, and how much temperature error did you see?

Altimeter lock:
I think this is a highly overrated feature. No aircraft altimeter has an altimeter lock, nor does my mechanical Thommen. The only useful thing such a feature does is remember what the altitude was when I stopped moving yesterday, so I don't have to reset it before I start moving today. But a piece of paper and pencil works nearly as well. When I'm stationary, I don't care whether the altimeter drifts - I *know* I'm not moving and I don't need an altimeter to tell me that. And when I start moving, I ought to reset the altimeter anyway for best accuracy, whether or not it has an automatic lock. If I'm hiking and changing altitude at the same time the weather is changing, no pressure altimeter can separate the two sources of pressure change, and it will become more inaccurate over time. Altimeter lock only suppresses drift while you're stationary, not while you're moving.

Resolution:
Yes, the Casios are limited to 5 m display resolution, and their accuracy is probably comparable. Don't buy one if you are surveying and need 1 m accuracy. But 5 m seems to be quite sufficient for most purposes. The mechanical Thommen altimeters have a resolution of 10 m or 20 ft. Aircraft altimeters have 20 ft markings, though you can interpolate between them. What do you actually need any better resolution for?

With an altimeter lock, drifts are simply history. I can sit with my Tech4o and have a Tornado blasting my surrounding away, and the altimeter won't move one single meter. But you are right - sit there with your Riseman and watch your altitude miraculous rising to Mount Everest heights when the Tornado approaches...;-)
cheers
Drifts when you are not moving are history. But when I'm sitting still, I don't need an altimeter to tell me that. And when I'm moving while the weather is changing, that Tech4o will drift just as much as any Casio altimeter does, since both are "unlocked".

- Dave
 

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Dave,

in this forum we had the discussion about Casio altimeters/barometers accuracy about a million times and the conclusion is always the same: for some they work, for others they don't. I'm in the latter group and from years of experience with all kind of ABC watches, I can say that Casio does the worst job of them all. And a word about overrated features: anything that helps - and be it only slightly - to increase the performance and help to maintain accuracy can't ever be overrated. If Casio would start to incorporate alti locks, they even would make a big step foward, given the level of poor performance, again based on my experience with three PRG-80 (with one total failure of the solar battery and/or module), three PRW-1300 (the absolutely worst of all), one PRG-240, one GW-9200 and two SPF-60 Sea pathfinders.


cheers
 

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Dave,

in this forum we had the discussion about Casio altimeters/barometers accuracy about a million times and the conclusion is always the same: for some they work, for others they don't. I'm in the latter group and from years of experience with all kind of ABC watches, I can say that Casio does the worst job of them all. And a word about overrated features: anything that helps - and be it only slightly - to increase the performance and help to maintain accuracy can't ever be overrated. If Casio would start to incorporate alti locks, they even would make a big step foward, given the level of poor performance, again based on my experience with three PRG-80 (with one total failure of the solar battery and/or module), three PRW-1300 (the absolutely worst of all), one PRG-240, one GW-9200 and two SPF-60 Sea pathfinders.
cheers
I'm curious what sort of failures or errors you have seen with your Casios (in addition to the one totally dead one you mentioned). If temperature compensation was poor, what size errors did you see over what temperature range? Some of my own measurements:

I tried cooling a PAW-1300 and SGW-300H in a refrigerator for several hours (at ~4 C). Then I took each watch out of the refrigerator and mounted it on my arm, watching the barometer reading as the watch warmed up to ~28 C. The inexpensive SGW-300H showed no noticeable change in reading as it warmed up. Its absolute calibration was good too, reading the same as several other more expensive barometers within 1 mb (0.1%).

The PAW-1300 did not perform as well. Its barometer reading changed 2-3 mb as it warmed up, equivalent to an altitude change of about 20-25 m. And its absolute barometer reading was about 4 mb too high, compared to the rest of the barometers. The watch provides a way to calibrate out this error easily enough, but I'd be more impressed if it was calibrated correctly from the factor (like the SGW-300 was).

However, the primary purpose of an altimeter is to display changes in pressure as changes in altitude, once it has been calibrated at a location of known altitude. Both Casios performed fine at this. I once took all the altimeters I could lay my hands on for a trip to the top of a local 1000 m high mountain, after calibrating them at the base. All of the electronic altimeters (including the Casios) agreed with each other within 1%. The most inaccurate of the batch was the altimeter that would have been most expensive when new: the Thommen TX-18 mechanical. The TX-18 reads the amount of altitude change as being about 2% larger than it really is.

So, based on my own measurements, the altimeter performance of the Casios is nearly as good as any of the other altimeters. The Casio watches are also considerably smaller than all the others, which are pocket-sized but not watch-sized, so I'm more likely to actually take one of the Casios with me when walking than something larger.

- Dave
 
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