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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I spent yesterday restoring this mid 60s Roamer.

It had a broken set bridge, missing crown and stem, and most importantly the seconds pinion was broken and second hand was missing. The dial and case were in great condition - but the crystal was so scratched up you could barely see through it. It looked horrible on eBay when I bought it (for not much).

So far I have done 3 pocket watches, but this is my first complete restoration of a wrist watch (I have almost finished my Benrus CK2 cal, but that is currently sitting in time out until it behaves :-x).

Movement was totally stripped, cleaned, oiled and replacement parts fitted. The movement is an MST414 and was an absolute pleasure to work on. :-!



Train assembled.



Barrel & lever.



Barrel bridge and click.



Ready for motion work and setting mechanisms



Bits...



Finished (well almost, incabloc spring still needs to be clipped back in). Micro regulator on these is very nice :-!.



New strap.




Crystal was worth a long time with sandpaper and brasso, as it is an original Roamer signed crystal - which are no longer available. I know the second hand is the wrong colour, but it will have to wait until my pen plater arrives.



Mmmmmm, I have an unnatural love for chapter rings :-!



Running.

YouTube - MVI 3535

It is a good size at 35mm (without crown). I am pretty happy with the final result :-!
 

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Excellent job trim. How are you cleaning the parts?
 

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Again I find your posts an inspiration!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great job with nice pictures, well done.
Looks like it just came from the factory~Great job! ;-)
Thanks guys. :-!

Excellent job trim. How are you cleaning the parts?
Old school M. A good long soak in lighter fluid. Srub with a brush and peg holes, nooks and crannies. Pivots I clean by rotating them in pithwood. Finally back to the lighter fluid and then rinsed in a second clean container of lighter fluid and air dry. It takes a while, but it is part of the fun as I don't have to do this for a living. Kinda also gets me in the zen state for reassembly b-). Having seen/heard what ultrasonics can do to movement plating I will never use them.

Again I find your posts an inspiration!
Thanks Eeeb, I really hope you give it a go sooner rather than later :-!.I have so far found it easier than I expected (although with a LOT of reading, De Carle, Chicago School and Bulova School amongst others). Just don't start by working on anything you care about.

Did you get the dial restored also, or is it just mint? Excellent pics, and a nice watch.
Thanks ;-). The dial is original and not refinished. It was the major reason to buy the watch, as the rest of it was a mess. It was hard to be certain as the crystal was bad - but it was one of those eBay gambles that paid out.
 

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...

Thanks Eeeb, I really hope you give it a go sooner rather than later :-!.I have so far found it easier than I expected (although with a LOT of reading, De Carle, Chicago School and Bulova School amongst others). Just don't start by working on anything you care about.
I'm going to do it. It might have to wait until I retire however .... but, one of the advantages of being is a geezer is that isn't far away! :-d
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all :-!

Wow. You have inspired me to give this a try. I will try on a beater first, of course. Nice job.
I'm going to do it. It might have to wait until I retire however .... but, one of the advantages of being is a geezer is that isn't far away! :-d
Then my work here is done b-)

All joking aside, I am a nub at this - but it has added such a rich new dimension to the hobby for me. This is a much more active rather than passive thing to do. Wearing a watch you have 'brought back from the dead' is a great feeling. :-!
 

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Thanks for an excellent post. Like you, I am finding it very enjoyable to take a more hands on approach to this hobby. Keep sharing your great work with us.
 

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Looks great!

I have stripped several 40's-70's beaters (bought some vintage lots on ebay) and tried to put them back together.. I'm beginning to get the hang of it, but keep struggling with some parts of the assembly, like getting the escape wheel with the train in, and sometimes some parts of the winding mechanism. Practise is the best way to learn tho so I'm glad I have like 30 more watches to practise on ;)

Where do you get your information on how to assemble a movement?
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Info, well...

I cannot recommend highly enough "Practical Watch Repairing" by de Carle. Fantastic approachable book. It gets a bit harder as it goes and mixing the reading in with fiddling is the way to go.

The Chicago School of Watchmaking is also brilliant, and you can buy it on ebay for around $20 sometimes with digital download so you don't have to wait :-!

I have also bought the Bulova School of Watchmaking book - now being reprinted and very nice indeed to hold. Excellent diagrams etc, a little terse on the text as of course you were meant to be at the school :p.
 

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Thanks a bunch..! I have ordered the books :)
I've only been working on watches so far without any reference, and that is sometimes pretty frustrating. Learning a lot fro it tho, actually completed my first complete working re-assembly :D A 1940's Helvetia german militairy watch. It's a great feeling for sure.. and hopefully many more to come!
 

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I'd be grateful if you have any tips on assembling the balance cock on the MST414. I am trying to replace regulator as old one had broken pin. I can't seem to get the top jewel to protude enough to fit the c-clip that holds it all together. Do I need a special press tool or something
 

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You don't need a special tool or a press, but yes it is tricky. I don't take mine apart as a rule for cleaning for this reason, but I've not done it recently enough to recall if there is a trick to it. trim may have a better memory and have done it more recently.
 

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congrats on the job
 
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