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Discussion Starter #1
Before I purchased a BLRO, I was concerned about the color of the bezel, as seen in varying light conditions and surroundings (as I researched it). Some said it looked pink and purple. Owning it, my experience has been that it’s a throw back to the first GMT, with the bakelight bezel, in most lighting. Artificial light gives it some colors, and natural light seems to make it look best, to me. YMMV.

I thought I would post a few pics I took using natural light studio lightbulbs, with a gray card in the background. Because everyone’s individual monitor makes colors look different, someone said that using a photographers gray card would allow viewers to adjust their monitors to the correct gray level and (as a result) see the BLRO as it would be seen in proper natural Iight conditions.

Perhaps it will help someone who has the question I had, about bezel insert and colors. Smurf included for comparison.








Just another WIS who loves to trade!
 

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Gray cards are used for an initial shot then you adjust to the gray level in Lightroom or photoshop which zeroes in your white balance. Good idea, not the right execution, but definitely some nice watches!


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Discussion Starter #4
Gray cards are used for an initial shot then you adjust to the gray level in Lightroom or photoshop which zeroes in your white balance. Good idea, not the right execution, but definitely some nice watches!


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Thanks for the info! Someone asked me to include a gray card in a photo and I believe their premise was to set the gray color on their monitor to agree with the card. Not sure if that makes sense; but they said they thought they could calibrate their monitor using that card, and in doing so, they could see the proper balance. Cheers!


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Thanks for the info! Someone asked me to include a gray card in a photo and I believe their premise was to set the gray color on their monitor to agree with the card. Not sure if that makes sense; but they said they thought they could calibrate their monitor using that card, and in doing so, they could see the proper balance. Cheers!

Yep. That’s the trick. Works every time.


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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks! Watches are my second most expensive hobby lol


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I see you are a knife guy. I’m a Strider fan, Hinder, and my favorite is Poltergeist, a maker in Poland. Both those hobbies have been expensive for me. But it’s fun, and I don’t golf, etc...


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I see you are a knife guy. I’m a Strider fan, Hinder, and my favorite is Poltergeist, a maker in Poland. Both those hobbies have been expensive for me. But it’s fun, and I don’t golf, etc...


Just another WIS who loves to trade!
Consider me a basic biotch then. I love benchmade and spyderco. Just ordered my first Bali song.

Here’s some more watches.


Lots more on my desktop. Have been practicing my macro and lighting skills on watches. My father’s antique hunting knife for fun.



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Gray cards are less for calibrating monitors and more for calibrating your camera’s white balance. Just wanted to make that distinction.


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