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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been handling my son's brand spanking new CW C60 Trident recently, just to see how well it does out of the box. Since it's a future gift to him I've been handling it with rubber gloves as not to get ANY marks on it. Getting the gloves on has been a chore; maybe they are too small or too old or whatever, but they always get stuck with an inch of finger hanging off the end.

Today I was examining a workmate's Hamilton Khaki and was more concerned about passing Covid back or forth (we have very strict rules here at work) so I first donned my mask, then sanitized with hand sanitizer, let it evaporate completely, then pulled the gloves on and "Snap" they went on completely in one quick motion.

I suppose some of the inactive ingredients stayed behind and were enough to lubricate the gloves so they didn't catch halfway on. I was really surprised after all my recent struggles.

Just thought I'd pass it along if anyone else suffers this problem.
 

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Maybe get some simple cotton gloves, they are cheap, pretty common for handling brass clock parts without leaving fingerprints.
 

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The enemy is moisture and/or oil. An alcohol based sanitizer (non-gel type), will dry you out for a good slip. We used to use talc in rubber gloves as a desiccant. Cotton gloves are great!
Regards, BG
 

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Discussion Starter #4
^^^ Both you guys, I've got a pair right here in my desk top middle drawer. Never would of thought of it. Duh!

(Sometimes you can lead a horse to water... But you can't make him surf!)
 

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Agree with the cotton gloves and if nothing else one can wear them for quite a while without the sweat associated with rubber/latex.

I do use latex gloves when working with solvents/inks and find the best way I find to put on new ones is to
1. Blow in to them to make sure they don't stick to themselves
2. Put the fingers in first i.e. don't try and pull the whole glove on at once.
3. Then put the thumb in
4. Then pull on the rest of the glove.

I just peel them off backwards and sometimes reuse them.
Then before I do the steps above I replace 1. by holding the glove closed at the back and then squeezing till the fingers and thumbs of the glove pop out. You might need to have a few goes at that.

BTW also make sure you get a size that is large enough because I have had to use XL instead of XXL and they are a pain to get on and off.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
TL: DR Don't use cotton gloves.

I have a word of warning about cotton gloves. Way back in my career as an Aerospace Manufacturing Engineer, I was responsible for planning and execution of the installation of a major subsystem in the product we were making at the time. Can't go into details but the subsystem cost enough to buy all the properties in a small town. There were some contamination issues that had to be dealt with but it was supposed to be delivered clean and we were in a clean room using recommended clean room practices.

After installation, I took a contamination cover from the subsystem to show to my boss and he immediately noticed a contamination issue on the inside of the cover; not something we had done but something designed into the cover. The subcontractor was brought in the following morning and we opened a portion of the installation so they could take contamination samples. They brought a black light to examine for contamination and took pictures under black light as well.

The conclusion was that they were able to decontaminate the subsystem well enough that they felt it met requirements. The alternative would be to uninstall it and ship it back for full disassembly and cleaning, something that would have been both a huge cost and schedule impact.

So, where do the cotton gloves come into play? Well, our M&P folks recommended we use cotton gloves during the installation, removal of the cover and some additional installation on our part around the opening. When the samples were examined, they determined that there was contamination from the defect my boss spotted, but the lion's share of the contamination was lint from our gloves. I remember taking a fluorescent black light and a cotton glove to a VP level management meeting and, with the lights off and the black light on, I shook a cotton glove above the table and we all watched the snow of fibers shedding onto the table.

Well, that was certainly the end of cotton gloves; we switched to dustless latex.

BTW, if you are curious about the power of a black light, take a good strong one (mine is a 20W single bulb that's maybe 18 inches long) into the toilet or kitchen. Be prepared for a shock. Not all dirt responds to black light, but if you have contamination that does, you likely have plenty more that doesn't.

I wouldn't recommend cotton gloves for anything that involves opening the case.
 
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