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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone,

A number of months ago, and with the help of this subforum, I purchased my first mechanical watch, the Sea-Gull M182SK. (Please don't ask what manner of wristwear I was partial to before).

It's a beautiful piece, which is why I can't resist posting a photograph of it here, even though it serves little purpose, but I have a question on the movement's durability which I haven't been able to find on Google or the forum's own search bar. As I understand it, it isn't a rare mechanism, so I hope you fine people can provide some experience and insight.

Next month I'll be attending an eighth-circuit conference featuring Justice Alito... and I must confess I'm a bit of a fan. So, will my clapping like one of those monkey dolls with the cymbals on the hands ruin my watch's accuracy?

Thanks!
 

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Mod. Russian, China Mech.
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The shockproofing of an ST16 should be equal to any other basic mechanical watch movement. In lesser brands you might legitimately have concerns about how securely the hands have been fitted, but this is a Sea-Gull so it should be alright.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wonderful!

Thanks for your reply, Chasecomm; I rather thought I was just being paranoid, but I'd rather be reassured that I wouldn't throw a perfectly serviceable watch away for no reason.
 

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yeah, seagull uses a incabloc-type shock mechanism, which is as good as any other, but has the added advantage of being easy to repair because the cage where the jewel is mounted opens up like a door.

One thing to keep in mind is that the st-16 uses an indirectly driven second hand that tends to stutter on impact but immediately resumes without any degradation to time keeping. I personally think it is one of the more underrated basic movements in the Seagull stable.
 
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