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I have an Omega Seamaster 300 I bought new in 1969. It runs fine, but the hands and dial markings are pitted, and it even looks like a fungus is growing on the phosphorescent dial markings. (What is that?) Also, the bezel is scrached, chipped, and faded.
Anyone know how much I should expect to pay to recondition this watch, restoring it to its original appearance?
Is there a good mail order repair center I can trust and which would be reasonably inexpensive?
--The Old Major
P.S. How times have changed! This watch cost me about $250 brand-new in 1969. Today, a comparable Seamaster would cost about $3,000, would it not?
 

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Just this afternoon I got my 63 Omega SM 300 back from Nesbits in Seattle. The total charge was $875 which did not include a bezel or dial.

Figure probably another couple hundred for those items.

I'm too happy and will post some photos tomorrow.

Nesbits does a great job and is an authorized Omega service center.
 

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Thanks. I live in the Seattle area. I'll check it out.

Just this afternoon I got my 63 Omega SM 300 back from Nesbits in Seattle. The total charge was $875 which did not include a bezel or dial.

Figure probably another couple hundred for those items.

I'm too happy and will post some photos tomorrow.

Nesbits does a great job and is an authorized Omega service center.
 

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welcome to the forum
does yours have the date feature?
is it on a bracelet or band?
any pictures?
by the way you could get a case if yours is really beat up, they are not that much, non date dials are available also, then hold onto the original items
 

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Having it repaired by an Omega authorized center would be the way to go. If the watch needs replacement parts then you are probably looking into the 800-1000 range. A new bezel alone would be about 200$ (it might be possible to just change the insert which couild be cheaper).

As far as value, as these are no longer produced you need to look at what they currently sell for. Probably somewhere around the 1500-1700US$, depending on condition. This is for the 165.024 model.

I have an Omega Seamaster 300 I bought new in 1969. It runs fine, but the hands and dial markings are pitted, and it even looks like a fungus is growing on the phosphorescent dial markings. (What is that?) Also, the bezel is scrached, chipped, and faded.
Anyone know how much I should expect to pay to recondition this watch, restoring it to its original appearance?
Is there a good mail order repair center I can trust and which would be reasonably inexpensive?
--The Old Major
P.S. How times have changed! This watch cost me about $250 brand-new in 1969. Today, a comparable Seamaster would cost about $3,000, would it not?
 
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It's not the repair center to trust, it's the mailing organization I would be concerned with. I think - this is my opinion - it best to take the watch to an Omega dealer and allow them to take the responsibility of shipping, This way, you know you are covered. Or at least, if it's lost or damaged, you can sue locally.

Do I sound a bit paranoid?!?!? Sorry, I've been married once.:-d

Drew
 

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IF you use USPS - you can insure for full value (in this case). When it comes to mailing, I would be concerned if the item had sentimental value or was no longer available. In this case, it does not matter if you send it through a dealer or yourself.... :-(


It's not the repair center to trust, it's the mailing organization I would be concerned with. I think - this is my opinion - it best to take the watch to an Omega dealer and allow them to take the responsibility of shipping, This way, you know you are covered. Or at least, if it's lost or damaged, you can sue locally.

Do I sound a bit paranoid?!?!? Sorry, I've been married once.:-d

Drew
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No, I don't have the date feature. It is on its original stainless-steel bracelet. Thanks for the tips about cases and faces being available.
 

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For a dial cleanup and refurbish, Nesbit's charge just over ~$125 (don't have the final bill for the SM120 yet). That would be on top of a 'full service', which is nearly $500. Nesbit's are very good about calling to discuss how much/little work you want to have done. If you can deliver the watch yourself and talk to the folks there FTF, even better.

It's not possible to change just the bezel insert on an SM300, you have to swap the whole thing out. Omega will have NOS ones available, but I'd recommend keeping the old one and getting out the Polywatch & elbow grease. Omega can get this watch looking factory new, but there is a lot of value (IMO) in keeping older watches looking their age.

NOS (Watchco):



Original:

 

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The Old Major,

I love these restoration project stories!:)

I/we would really like to see before and after photos of the job.
 
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