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The case tube looks exactly as it should. The threads are on the inside of the case tube (where they are protected from dust and dirt) rather than on the outside.



If the crown is no longer threading down properly, it's possible that the threads have been stripped by cross threading. They then look like this:



If so, it will have to go to Omega, and I wouldn't expect that to be covered under warranty.

Cheers, Al
 

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I've been wearing screw down crown watches daily for the last 40 years without incident, one Rolex, one Omega so IMO it doesn't seem that hard to perform that operation without stripping the threads. But, it also seems to me that unscrewing a crown and screwing it back in again is a common enough practice that the design should be such that the threads engage reliably every time without requiring any special technique to ensure they've engaged properly. In other words, unless the user is extremely careless it would seem to me that stripped threads are more indicative of a sub-optimum design, rather than user error, so I'd be upset if it wasn't covered by warranty.
No special technique is required. But nevertheless, people do damage threads, as I’ve repaired many of them. The brand doesn’t matter, it happens across all of them, so they are either all “sub-optimum” designs, or people make mistakes occasionally. I know which option I’d put my money on...
 

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I have many watches for which I routinely set the time regularly, without problem of "cross-threading." I'm always careful when I do this. If they blame it on me, I will not be happy about it. I take care of my stuff :)
See what they say, but if the threads are damaged, I doubt they will cover it under warranty.
 

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I've recently had this as well. It started with difficulty screwing the crown back in and then eventually wouldn't engage / screw in at all. I returned the watch to the Southampton UK service centre and it was repaired under warranty.

However, on return of the watch, the service centre did send a note stating that this must have happened due to some act of misuse caused by myself and not as a result of a defect but that they had carried out the repair free of charge as an act of goodwill 'on this occasion'. As they did the repair free of charge, I left it at that but had they not fixed it I would have kicked off as it was absolutely not due to any misuse of damage 'inflicted by the user'
That wasn't a warranty repair - it was a courtesy repair - very different thing.
 

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If the crown detached from the watch, and human error could cause it to be re-inserted crooked and result in cross threading, I'd agree with you. But in this case there are two objects with threads that are aligned by a common shaft in the middle to keep them aligned. In my mind, an optimum design would have tight enough tolerance so that alignment can't be screwed up, and the threads would always engage properly. I don't know what happens to cause the threads to be stripped, can you elaborate a bit?
There is enough flexibility in the stem and seals that the crown can be misaligned. Look you can believe whatever you wish, but this is not an unusual thing - again it happens across all brands. People sometimes don't pay attention and the threads get damaged. The only watches where this can't happen are watches that don;t have screw down crowns.
 
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