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Mod. Russian, China Mech.
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
No, calm down everybody. I haven't bought an ultra-rare 1960s military issued watch. This question is just an attempt to broaden my understanding of early Chinese watchmaking.

I was wondering if any of our Chinese literate members have found on one of the Chinese language forums any detailed information about the specifications of the rare SS2 automatic. A photographic tear-down of the movement would be perfect if you can find one. I'm curious about the layout of the train, how the second hand is driven, and particularly how the auto-winding operates.

All I have at the moment are a couple of good photos of the movement.



I had until now thought this movement was the final result of the rumoured Shanghai automatic project started in 1959 but then cancelled. It has been said that this design was derived from Rolex. However I finally dug up a photo of a 1950s Rolex automatic, and I noticed that the auto-winding mechanism is quite diferent from the SS2.

And when I looked closer at the SS2, I realized that the winding mechanism is rather unusual.

If I am correctly interpreting the view through the hole in the top plate, it appears to use some kind of pawl-and-wheel system, like the IWC Pellaton.

However the Pellaton takes up most of the space onthe top of the movement. This Shanghai movement is more compact, like Timex's interpretation of the Pellaton system, also from the early 1960s.

I migt be completely off-track here, but I think there are some features of the SS2 that sets it apart from any other Chinese movement, and I'd like to understand it better. Can anybody help?
 

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Mod. Russian, China Mech.
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19,045 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Replying to my own thread from years ago, the answer appears to be in this thread:

Some fun new AMCHPR exhibits...and maybe a mystery solved ;-)

which contains diagrams of the Pellaton-style auto-winding system utilised by the Shanghai SS2. The cam is circular like Timex's version (an off-set circle being as effective as the lobed profile of Pellaton's original)

Somewhere along the way I have discovered that the SS4 also used a Pellaton winding system, but I can't remember where I discovered it or if there is a thread about it somewhere o|
 

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How cool is that :)

I guess you can officially add the SS2 to that list of movements with the Pellaton and it's derivatives.
 
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