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Hello, I need help with this Seikosha chronograph pocket watch. I bought it at a flea market recently and I'm looking for any information about it. I found the same watches as mine on the web but there is something that I cannot explain. Each of them has some writings and numbers on the back. Mine doesn't have it. But the rest including the case back inside looks completely the same, there are the same marks and that small writing SKS. What do you think about it? Can you tell me something more about it? Here are some pictures I made.
 

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Hi there,

...Each of them has some writings and numbers on the back. Mine doesn't have it.
Consider that some people are no soldiers, and in many societies civilians even represent the majority. Consequently most watches have no numbers on the back, and only get them if bought by an army or any other organization who wants to register its possession. Another reason for such numbers are sellers who "militarize" civilian watches to gain some cash from unexperienced buyers. So be happy with your missing number; a missing number can't be a fake number.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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The Imperial Army issued chronographs would normally have Japanese text engraved to the back with military marks. Yours has an anchor (and only on the inside cover) so naturally one would assume, if anything, it might have been used by their Navy. However without those markings unlikely, perhaps it might have been used by their Merchant Navy. I'm guessing SKS is an abbreviation for Seikosha. The watch probably dates from 1930 to mid 1940's and it looks like some kind of early Landeron movement. I'm sure some more familiar with those would be able to be more precise. In any case, I think the movement is Swiss. Japan did import Swiss movements at some point in time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you very much for your responses. As for the movement I'm not sure but I've read somewhere that it is a modified Longines.
 

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Hi.Valjoux is similar, but 1) they say that Seikosha used modified Longines cal. 18.72 at that time, 2) that Longines looks same as mine and 3) Longines 18.72 can be found in similar watches to mine.

Look here: https://uhrforum.de/threads/seikosha-chronograph-ww2.375991/

And here:
https://www.sellingantiques.co.uk/599160/ww2-japanese-naval-issued-pocket-chronograph-watch-by-seikosha-circa-1942/#
Both links you show stated they copied and modified the Longines, didn't they?
 

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Hi there,

Both links you show stated they copied and modified the Longines, didn't they?
They did, but this means not that it's true. One post is the claim of a seller, and Longines gains more cash than Valjoux. The second is likely an unproven copy of an unproven copy of an unproven.....

Anyway, being a slightly modified Valjoux 54 is not really fatal. Quite the contrary, if you ever need spare parts, the Valjoux origin is a huge advantage.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Sorry but this movement has nothing to do with any Longines. Of the two links you submitted, neither provides strong enough facts to support their theory. If you look at how the bridges of your movement are designed, you'll see it looks much more like a Valjoux 54 than a Longines 18.72. Actually, a lot of parts are exactly the same as the Valjoux 54, while nothing looks like any part of any Longines pocket chronograph.
Can you measure the diameter of the movement ? If it's a Valjoux 54 like I think, it should measure around 39.30mm or a little less if you measure only the top bridges.

Just so you can easily compare which one looks the most like yours (Valjoux left, Longines right) :
valjoux-54-1947-300x284.jpg longines-1872-lep.jpg
 
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