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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m actually curious as to how the majority of this forum feels about this topic. How detailed should a listing be in FSOT? At what point is asking for all the minor details too much?
I know some people feel that, “It’s a preowned watch, it’s not BNIB, get over it.” I fully agree on that, which I think is a separate idea entirely from full disclosure.

When I’m purchasing a preowned watch on the forum, I really look for the details. I want full disclosure. I want to see the dings on the case, micro scratches on the bezel, dust on the dial. I want someone to take a loupe and look for any scratches on the AR coating of a crystal. It matters a lot to me if a watch has had any refinishing. I care a lot about the stretch in a bracelet. I care if you are a smoker or not!!!

That’s why I feel very comfortable buying from some people, and I can’t understand other sales posts that still seem to sell quickly.

For example, if I see mismatched serial numbers on a hang tag against a warranty card – and you don’t have a reasonable answer to the question, that is highly concerning. If you are missing links in the bracelet, and you say you purchased BNIB, why on earth are links missing? Just post it in the sales thread, don’t make me hunt down the answers.
I extra appreciate people who show me the full lineage of the watch – who they last purchased it from. I like knowing these details.

This is why I don’t understand some luxury sales threads with exceptionally short descriptions and lack of detail still readily sell.

That said, I’ll eat it when I purchase a watch and feel like the ball was hidden on a minor detail – but that’s also why I ask lots of questions, ask for serial number photos matched against warranty cards, copies of receipts, and will almost always walk away if I feel a buyer’s responses or details don’t add up. I've encountered plenty of sellers are who simply annoyed by this. They really subscribe to the "it's not brand new, get over it" philosophy. I just wish more people cared about this.

Am I in the minority on this?
 
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I think plenty of detail in the FS listing is a no bad thing. If the prospective buyer is just a member of the public then all the extra detail will just be so much "fluff" but if the buyer is a WIS the extra detail may just be enough to attract them.
 

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I'm thinking you and I will never do a watch deal. ;)

I'm pretty much the opposite. I look at the general condition of the watch and a few other things that may be interesting to me. If something's missing, I may ask about it. But in general, I don't obsess over my watches.

When I sell watches here (and I've sold plenty) I make sure to let people know that I don't obsess over my watches and to expect (what I consider) normal wear. If the buyer is really detail-oriented, then I'm probably not your seller.

Note that I take good care of my watches and pretty much anyone that's bought one of my watches has commented that the watch was better than described, which is my goal.

But overall, this is a hobby to me. I don't have hobbies to cause me stress.
 

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Some sellers don't even bother posting pics of what they are selling forget a detailed description... it really puts me off when people think that they are alright to mention nothing of the age and service history and the prospective buyer should still be ok with it... worse even they expect a question on a PM where other prospective buyers can't see the answers.

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I only care about good quality pictures and if there is an issue mechanically. Anyone can write up a great description of a watch saying its in great shape, but if the pictures are taken with a 1990s nokia, then ill move along.

The saying "A picture is worth a thousand words" is true in the business of used watches.
 

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I think some of this also depends on the price range of the watch. When I sold a Tudor Heritage Chrono, I put a lot more time and effort into pics and descriptions. A couple of $25 cheapies I just sold got a pic and a quick description, though I wouldn't hesitate to answer questions about them..


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To me it depends on the price point of the watch and the condition that it is in. Just looking at the watches in your signature... if you asked me that level of detail about your Orient or Seiko pieces, I'd answer your questions and be willing to provide whatever you asked for... BUT I would also be hoping in the back of my mind that I'd get that "I'll take it. What's your paypal?" message in the meantime.

If I'm selling a $100 watch, I will:
post 5-10 pictures of it
assuming it's in excellent condition, tell you that it's generally in excellent condition with some normal wear but nothing noticeable on the wrist
if there is anything serious or noticeable, I will describe and photograph it as best I can
the crystal and bezel are perfect
tell you whether I purchased it new or used and roughly when
photograph everything included (boxes, papers, straps, etc.)

I do think that should be sufficient. Watches in the low price ranges like that usually have no shortage of buyers so I don't feel the need to spend hours of my time pampering the most scrutinizing of buyers. Now if I'm selling a $5000 watch, I'll include more photos and details. Basically I just include the things that I would want to know if I was buying the piece. If I'm buying a used watch, I'm expecting normal signs of wear unless the listing expressly states that it is "like new" or something to that effect. I don't need a picture of every little swirl in the polish. If there is a major blemish, tell me about it. That's all I really ask.
 

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The more you include in the listing the fewer problems later. I like a lot of clear photos from all angles and full disclosure on any issues. But of course it depends on the price of the watch.
 

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some people that are selling are lazy sellers and just follow up on serious inquiries only or they have so many watches for sale that they just want the sale post for visibility.
 

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I expect there to be disclosure as any known issues. With that said, there are sometimes things that I might not see you when I'm looking at the watch that somebody else was going over it with the loop or looking in a spot that I might not have my eye on and sees a little something. I think if you are clear that the watch is used and that any marks on it would be minor swirlies and there aren't any major dings or scratches, that if there's a little something on a watch that wasn't mentioned but the general condition of the wash made it known that it wasn't in perfect shape, that that would be okay. If, however, I get a watch that has scratches on the lugs and it wasn't disclosed, or there's a piece of dust under the crystal that wasn't disclosed, or something along those lines I would probably ask for a return or money to get the dust removed.

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I'd say transparency is important to me in a sale. Just because something has a scratch or scuff doesn't mean I won't buy it... it just means I'm going to weigh this in my decision. Maybe I'll just ask for a small negotiation or maybe it's negligible. I just ask to have all the facts.

I recently bought a turtle PADI off here, it was for a good price and the owner told me straight out - it has a small scuff on the crown. I decided that for the price it was still a nice deal. It was in great shape otherwise. I still bought it, the small scuff is there, but I have an otherwise perfect watch.

I know maybe being brutally honest about scratches or such might take your watch longer to sell or hurt the price... but is it worth headaches of a dissatisfied buyer and payment dispute?


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I'm thinking you and I will never do a watch deal. ;)

I'm pretty much the opposite. I look at the general condition of the watch and a few other things that may be interesting to me. If something's missing, I may ask about it. But in general, I don't obsess over my watches.

When I sell watches here (and I've sold plenty) I make sure to let people know that I don't obsess over my watches and to expect (what I consider) normal wear. If the buyer is really detail-oriented, then I'm probably not your seller.

Note that I take good care of my watches and pretty much anyone that's bought one of my watches has commented that the watch was better than described, which is my goal.

But overall, this is a hobby to me. I don't have hobbies to cause me stress.

I'd like this twice if I could. Right on the money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Interestingly, I find that the less expensive the watch, often the more critical the buyer. Money means something different to everyone, and if I had to generalize, folks shopping exclusively for under $1k are looking to extract every ounce of value from their $. The scratches and dings mean more per dollar. When someone who deals exclusively in the less expensive brands reaches out and shops luxury (i.e. grail -- very, very rare purchase), you better believe they are looking for perfection.

With continuous buyers of luxury watches, moving a few hundred on a $5k watch (the equivalent total value of the Orient I own) is a routine exercise. With shipping and paypal fees, I've taken ~$500 hits on luxury watches that I ultimately didn't connect with (Speedy Pro is a good example). It's actually why I will no longer sell off my Orient or other pieces that are valued at less than $500, the heartache and time of going through a sale on one of those watches isn't worth it for the return. If I did do it, it's out of necessity for some unforeseen financial dilemma -- and if I need the $300 that badly, stuff has really, really hit the fan.

That said, if I did sell them, I'm going to list out every last little detail I possibly can. Under promise and over deliver. :)

PS -- The same thing principle works with spouses. Happy wife happy life.




To me it depends on the price point of the watch and the condition that it is in. Just looking at the watches in your signature... if you asked me that level of detail about your Orient or Seiko pieces, I'd answer your questions and be willing to provide whatever you asked for... BUT I would also be hoping in the back of my mind that I'd get that "I'll take it. What's your paypal?" message in the meantime.

If I'm selling a $100 watch, I will:
post 5-10 pictures of it
assuming it's in excellent condition, tell you that it's generally in excellent condition with some normal wear but nothing noticeable on the wrist
if there is anything serious or noticeable, I will describe and photograph it as best I can
the crystal and bezel are perfect
tell you whether I purchased it new or used and roughly when
photograph everything included (boxes, papers, straps, etc.)

I do think that should be sufficient. Watches in the low price ranges like that usually have no shortage of buyers so I don't feel the need to spend hours of my time pampering the most scrutinizing of buyers. Now if I'm selling a $5000 watch, I'll include more photos and details. Basically I just include the things that I would want to know if I was buying the piece. If I'm buying a used watch, I'm expecting normal signs of wear unless the listing expressly states that it is "like new" or something to that effect. I don't need a picture of every little swirl in the polish. If there is a major blemish, tell me about it. That's all I really ask.
 
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I find it odd when I find ads with very short descriptions. Honestly, how long does it take to write up? 10 minutes? And to snap up multiple pictures (with an iphone) under good lighting that shows all the scratches/swirls? Another 10 minutes? If I were buying a watch here, what I would appreciate is honesty and, more specifically, transparency. So that's what I do when I sell.

For the few watches I've sold here (under $500), absolutely zero questions from interested buyers, only offers. Post sale, not a peep. Win-win situation for both parties.
 

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Interestingly, I find that the less expensive the watch, often the more critical the buyer. Money means something different to everyone, and if I had to generalize, folks shopping exclusively for <$1k are looking to extract every ounce of value from their $. The scratches and dings mean more per dollar. When someone who deals exclusively in the less expensive brands reaches out and shops luxury (i.e. grail -- very, very rare purchase), you better believe they are looking for perfection.

With continuous buyers of luxury watches, moving a few hundred on a $5k watch (the equivalent total value of the Orient I own) is a routine exercise. With shipping and paypal fees, I've taken ~$500 hits on luxury watches that I ultimately didn't connect with (Speedy Pro is a good example). It's actually why I will no longer sell off my Orient or other pieces that are valued at less than $500, the heartache and time of going through a sale on one of those watches isn't worth it for the return. If I did do it, it's out of necessity for some unforeseen financial dilemma -- and if I need the $300 that badly, stuff has really, really hit the fan.

That said, if I did sell them, I'm going to list out every last little detail I possibly can. Under promise and over deliver. :)

PS -- The same thing principle works with spouses. Happy wife happy life.
All very fair points. I agree with all of that. I do still sell my cheaper pieces in big waves though. It clears out room in the box and/or closet and helps fund new pieces as well. I just sold an Orient for $75 last week actually! I don't even remember what I paid for it, but I purchased it brand new so I know I took a hit. But even then it couldn't be more than probably $100 lost. Plus I lost an end link for the bracelet and was willing to take below normal market value naturally.

I'll leave you with this thought though, I think the buyer owes some duty to let the seller know if they intend to go over the watch with a loupe. I don't do that with new pieces from an AD. I probably would decline to sell you a piece if you told me you were going to go over it with a loupe. The likelihood of you discovering something that I just genuinely was not aware of is too great, and not worth the trouble imo.
 
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