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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

I’m relatively new to the world of watches and am experiencing a possible issue with my new watch. I’ve only had it for about a month and suddenly there’s a ton of resistance if I try to manually turn my crown. So much so, that I won’t even attempt to force it and just let it be 100% automatic. This is a bummer as it’s Chronometer and It hasn’t gained even a second in the last 6 days. Will I have issues down the road or could I just let it be? I haven’t tried to even mess with the date wheel or anything because it’s running so well. I Don’t want to worsen the problem.

I’ve noticed if i give it a shake, the crown will be able to turn Freely a little bit, before hitting resistance again.

its a Christopher Ward C65 Bronze Ombré. I’d really rather not send it off to the UK for months and if anything, I’d have it repaired locally, if need be.
 

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Is it only in the winding position, or is it stuck if you try to change the time or date as well? If it's only when winding, my guess is that if you did continue to apply force, you'd start to feel the rotor spinning as you turn the crown. Unfortunately, not uncommon with SW200s (I had the same issue, also in a CW, that developed when the watch was a little over a year old). Contact CW about a warranty repair. Repair queue is a bit long, mine took about 2 months, but came back good as new (per my timegrapher, a little better than new).
 

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It sounds like it’s faulty. Get it seen to now. I know it’s a PITA but you don’t want to be leaving the warranty period with a faulty watch.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Is it only in the winding position, or is it stuck if you try to change the time or date as well? If it's only when winding, my guess is that if you did continue to apply force, you'd start to feel the rotor spinning as you turn the crown. Unfortunately, not uncommon with SW200s (I had the same issue, also in a CW, that developed when the watch was a little over a year old). Contact CW about a warranty repair. Repair queue is a bit long, mine took about 2 months, but came back good as new (per my timegrapher, a little better than new).
Hmm, it’s just the winding function. I think you’re probably right. What if I just leave it as is? Will experience any other issues down the road? Because I’m so blown away at how good this thing is keeping time, along with the fact that I’m unwilling to part with it for any prolonged amount of time. I’d rather pay out of pocket for a local professional. As I understand, they’re a common enough movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It sounds like it’s faulty. Get it seen to now. I know it’s a PITA but you don’t want to be leaving the warranty period with a faulty watch.
Luckily, I’m only one month into a 60 month warranty, but I’m with you. If necessary, I will absolutely get it serviced.
 

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well... as TS had self admit, he's relatively new. hence, there's a possible ignorance that he had screw locked his crown, or in worse case, screwed up that crown lock sleeve thread, that caused the crown to be stuck?
 

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I'm not sure it would hurt anything to just leave it alone, but being without a manual winding function is kind of a hassle if you cycle through multiple watches. Might want to invest in a winder.

If you send it to an Indie for repair, it will likely void the warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
well... as TS had self admit, he's relatively new. hence, there's a possible ignorance that he had screw locked his crown, or in worse case, screwed up that crown lock sleeve thread, that caused the crown to be stuck?
It’s not a screw down. As far as I know, I haven’t improperly used the watch in anyway. all I’ve done is pull the crown to let time catch up to my movement once.

While I am relatively new, I have obsessively studied everything I can about as much as I can. Especially relative to the Sellita and the ETA. I know how common rotor spin can be with the SW200 vs the SW200-1 with the revised teeth.

You dont know what you don’t know though. Maybe I’m missing something entirely.

In the end, I’ve not found any information relating to the long term effects of the issue and if I can effectively just live with it being a purely automatic watch, more or less. For the foreseeable future at least.
 

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well... as TS had self admit, he's relatively new. hence, there's a possible ignorance that he had screw locked his crown, or in worse case, screwed up that crown lock sleeve thread, that caused the crown to be stuck?
Depending on date of production, the watch in question may not have a screw down crown. Models listed now (currently on pre-order) have them, but they were push/pull at one point.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Depending on date of production, the watch in question may not have a screw down crown. Models listed now (currently on pre-order) have them, but they were push/pull at one point.
Damn they’re screw down now? Haha, that’s just my luck. I could have waited a month.
 

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It’s not a screw down. As far as I know, I haven’t improperly used the watch in anyway. all I’ve done is pull the crown to let time catch up to my movement once.

While I am relatively new, I have obsessively studied everything I can about as much as I can. Especially relative to the Sellita and the ETA. I know how common rotor spin can be with the SW200 vs the SW200-1 with the revised teeth.

You dont know what you don’t know though. Maybe I’m missing something entirely.

In the end, I’ve not found any information relating to the long term effects of the issue and if I can effectively just live with it being a purely automatic watch, more or less. For the foreseeable future at least.
Rotor spin and the tooth profile (and tooth shearing on the ratchet wheel) are unrelated. Rotor spin is related to the reverser gears and is not unique to Sellitas. 2824s can develop this, too. Rotor spin seems to be a lubrication issue, from what I can find.

Sheared ratchet wheel teeth result in the crown slipping freely when you wind the watch.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Rotor spin and the tooth profile (and tooth shearing on the ratchet wheel) are unrelated. Rotor spin is related to the reverser gears and is not unique to Sellitas. 2824s can develop this, too. Rotor spin seems to be a lubrication issue, from what I can find.

Sheared ratchet wheel teeth result in the crown slipping freely when you wind the watch.
It’s probably just the anti sellita propaganda that says it’s primarily a Sellita issue, because an ETA is essentially the same movement right? Sellita having originally manufactured for ETA and all that jazz.

I appreciate the good info, man. I remember you from an older post of mine.

I still wish they would Have use the sw200-1, like they use in the C60 for a lesser cost. Oh well. Is the locked up crown and/or rotor spin still equally apparent in that one?
 

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It’s probably just the anti sellita propaganda that says it’s primarily a Sellita issue, because an ETA is essentially the same movement right? Sellita having originally manufactured for ETA and all that jazz.

I appreciate the good info, man. I remember you from an older post of mine.

I still wish they would Have use the sw200-1, like they use in the C60 for a lesser cost. Oh well. Is the locked up crown and/or rotor spin still equally apparent in that one?
Your watch has an SW200-1 in it. Sellita stopped producing the original SW200 and switched to the improved -1 over a decade ago. Companies simply say "SW200" as short-hand, just as people regularly just say 2824 rather than 2824-2.

Rotor spin is completely unrelated to the ratchet wheel tooth profile. Any movement that copies the 2824 reverser gear setup can develop rotor spin, including the 2824 itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Your watch has an SW200-1 in it. Sellita stopped producing the original SW200 and switched to the improved -1 over a decade ago. Companies simply say "SW200" as short-hand, just as people regularly just say 2824 rather than 2824-2.
Hey thanks! It’s weird because Christopher Ward actually says SW200-1 on some of their watches, but not others. Okay great.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Your watch has an SW200-1 in it. Sellita stopped producing the original SW200 and switched to the improved -1 over a decade ago. Companies simply say "SW200" as short-hand, just as people regularly just say 2824 rather than 2824-2.

Rotor spin is completely unrelated to the ratchet wheel tooth profile. Any movement that copies the 2824 reverser gear setup can develop rotor spin, including the 2824 itself.
15667127

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15667129

This is what caused my confusion
 

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Likely the result of long recycled press material, and material being written by marketing people rather than people who actually know about watches.
 

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MX793 really knows his stuff, so you are getting some excellent advice.

Good luck. If the issue persists, IMHO, I would take it to a local pro for inspection.
 

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Likely the result of long recycled press material, and material being written by marketing people rather than people who actually know about watches.
Right on. In any case, I’m glad you’ve cleared that up for me.
 

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MX793 really knows his stuff, so you are getting some excellent advice.

Good luck. If the issue persists, IMHO, I would take it to a local pro for inspection.
MX793 really knows his stuff, so you are getting some excellent advice.

Good luck. If the issue persists, IMHO, I would take it to a local pro for inspection.
I agree.

and thanks a lot. I’ll definitely do that. My main hesitation comes from a (probably unjustified) fear of losing it’s amazing accuracy after having it repaired.
 

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Your watch has an SW200-1 in it. Sellita stopped producing the original SW200 and switched to the improved -1 over a decade ago. Companies simply say "SW200" as short-hand, just as people regularly just say 2824 rather than 2824-2.

Rotor spin is completely unrelated to the ratchet wheel tooth profile. Any movement that copies the 2824 reverser gear setup can develop rotor spin, including the 2824 itself.
Yeah, I still had some hair when Sellita made the switch. 😂
 
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