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I have a watch that is 10 years old. It contains a 2500C movement. When I purchased the watch just a few months ago, the seller explained that, while it had never been serviced, the watch was never worn or used. How would this affect the needs of it being serviced? Being that it is 10 years old, I would typically need it serviced soon Does the fact that is was never used provide any kind of grace period?
 

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I have a watch that is 10 years old. It contains a 2500C movement. When I purchased the watch just a few months ago, the seller explained that, while it had never been serviced, the watch was never worn or used. How would this affect the needs of it being serviced? Being that it is 10 years old, I would typically need it serviced soon Does the fact that is was never used provide any kind of grace period?
Is it working and keeping time? What issues are you noticing that require servicing?


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I also own a 2500c co-axial Omega watch. I got it serviced after 5 years as it stopped working. Otherwise too I believe a watch not worn for long time needs service more urgently than a watch regularly worn. Co-axial movement is a complex movement that needs proper service though they say it requires lubricants at longer intervals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is working and keeping time OK. When I first picked it up, I recorded the accuracy for the first few days, and it was within COSC specs. There are no obvious signs it needs servicing, besides the age of the watch.
 

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I would be tempted to wear it until you see a change in time keeping. Lubricants and such can evaporate and be displaced over time and I believe the biggest danger in a watch running that is a bit dry is wearing of parts. I've always had great service from Nesbit's in Seattle. I would suggest contacting them or a trusted Omega watch shop in your area and asking their opinion to be sure though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I also own a 2500c co-axial Omega watch. I got it serviced after 5 years as it stopped working. Otherwise too I believe a watch not worn for long time needs service more urgently than a watch regularly worn. Co-axial movement is a complex movement that needs proper service though they say it requires lubricants at longer intervals.
Interesting. I'm sorry to hear about your watch. Do you service it on par with that of a non-coaxial? Or do you buy into the claim that it can go 8-10 years without servicing?

What would you say is proper servicing? I have contacted someone in my area who specializes in maintenance. He seems qualified, but perhaps it would be safer to send it to Omega? His website is ohiowatchrepair.com , if you are interested in taking a look.
 

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Lubricant oils dry out over time, photos taken by watchmakers during a service show that as it dries oil solidifies and becomes particles of dirt or gum. It’s definitely not properly lubricating the movement at that point. The watch may continue to run but wear may increase.
I’ve learned a lot by reading Watchguy UK’s blog http://watchguy.co.uk/
I have a 10+ yo Seamaster with a 2628, bought pre-owned in mint condition for my wife. I had a watchmaker pressure check it before a dive trip and he said the amplitude is a little low and it would need a service in the near future. It winds smoothly but runs a bit slower than COSC. I know what’s happening and will get it serviced.
 

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Interesting. I'm sorry to hear about your watch. Do you service it on par with that of a non-coaxial? Or do you buy into the claim that it can go 8-10 years without servicing?

What would you say is proper servicing? I have contacted someone in my area who specializes in maintenance. He seems qualified, but perhaps it would be safer to send it to Omega? His website is ohiowatchrepair.com , if you are interested in taking a look.
I would strongly suggest only letting a watchmaker who has an Omega account and has been trained by Omega specifically on the co-axial work on the watch. The co-axial movements require specialized tools and training to service properly.

Cheers, Al
 
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