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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A mate of mine just bought a SUB and was wondering why the accuracy was a little all over the place.

The settling-in period is often mention here but how long should it take before the watch goes into normal COSC spec accuracy. Is there anything special he should do apart from wearing it? Should he keep winding it if it is always being worn?

I told him to keep wearing it for 3 months and then if it is still outside COSC get it looked at under warranty. Is that right?

Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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I had quick settling periods with my omegas between 2 weeks and a month. For me the watch should always be on his wrist except when he bathes or takes a shower.
 

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Ferrari 312T said:
A mate of mine just bought a SUB and was wondering why the accuracy was a little all over the place.

The settling-in period is often mention here but how long should it take before the watch goes into normal COSC spec accuracy. Is there anything special he should do apart from wearing it? Should he keep winding it if it is always being worn?

I told him to keep wearing it for 3 months and then if it is still outside COSC get it looked at under warranty. Is that right?

Any advice would be appreciated.
Wearing it for a few months first is good advice. I don't really know what you mean by the accuracy being "a little all over the place". Accuracy can vary by a couple of seconds depending on the position of the watch. If he removes it at night, he can vary the storage position (crown up, crown down, lying flat etc) and monitor the changes. If he wears it all the time and there is significant variance, then he should take it to be looked at now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Elton Balch said:
Wearing it for a few months first is good advice. I don't really know what you mean by the accuracy being "a little all over the place". Accuracy can vary by a couple of seconds depending on the position of the watch. If he removes it at night, he can vary the storage position (crown up, crown down, lying flat etc) and monitor the changes. If he wears it all the time and there is significant variance, then he should take it to be looked at now.
The accuracy was a little odd. He wound it then it slowed right down and lost a couple of hours on the first night. He then changed the time and it lost about 10 seconds yesterday.

Funnily enough he gave me a agitated call about two hours ago telling me it had stopped altogether even though it was fully wound. Luckily he had bought it from an AD in London so he was able to take it back and ask for a new one. As they didn't have one he got a full refund and bought it elsewhere. This is probably a great example of why people recommend purchasing a watch from an AD. Even Rolex produce a dud every now and then so it is important to be able to get it fixed or replaced easily. Especially since he paid full RRP for it (£2610).
 
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Ferrari 312T said:
The accuracy was a little odd. He wound it then it slowed right down and lost a couple of hours on the first night. He then changed the time and it lost about 10 seconds yesterday.

Funnily enough he gave me a agitated call about two hours ago telling me it had stopped altogether even though it was fully wound. Luckily he had bought it from an AD in London so he was able to take it back and ask for a new one. As they didn't have one he got a full refund and bought it elsewhere. This is probably a great example of why people recommend purchasing a watch from an AD. Even Rolex produce a dud every now and then so it is important to be able to get it fixed or replaced easily. Especially since he paid full RRP for it (£2610).
That watch was unquestionably defective, so I'm glad your friend got his money back.

As for a "settling-in" period, your watch should run within the COSC specs from day one if it is a certified chronometer. Every Omega I have ever owned has run within these specs right out of the box, and if I ever got one that didn't I'd return it for a replacement. I think it's only reasonable to expect a chronometer to run like a chronometer.

If you play the "wait and see" game, you run the risk of waiting too long for the dealer to agree to swap the watch out for a new one. Then you're stuck having to be without a watch while you send it to Omega for repairs. If a watch is running outside of COSC specs from day one and doesn't improve within a few days, take it back. Why sit around and HOPE it will get better when you paid for a certified chronometer that is supposed to run as intended?

I do agree that watches will settle-in as they are worn and the lubricants disperse throughout the movement, but this should result in a change of only a few seconds time gain or loss per day. The watch should still remain within COSC specs at all times while it is "breaking-in".

Cheers,
John
 

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Well, since we've tiptoed around the issue, here is an explanation purportedly from Breitling posted on the old forum before the crash. Of course the material he is speaking of is Nivarox. I would imagine Omega is very similar. Like John, all Omegas I purchased new ran to COSC out of the box, but who knows how long they were in the box. Undoubtedly the watch in the original post in this thread is indeed in need of service. This is just some food for thought, guys. Cheers, Bob

Breitling COSC and Hairspring

OK, I decided to go ahead and post the full details now, since I am satisfied as to the veracity of the material I am about to reveal.

After re-checking the accuracy of my Chrono SA which I purchased new 3 months ago, I am pleased to report that the daily rate error has indeed improved sufficiently to meet the limits imposed by COSC certification. The initial error was approximately +8 to 9 sec/day and is now running at +5 sec/day, and is expected to improve even further, although this is expected to be a relatively small further improvement. At least it is now within official COSC requirements which allow for a range of -4 to +6 sec/day. And now I'm a happy camper!

The reason for the improvement in accuracy has very little to do with the lubricants, but rather has to do with the hairspring. For those who don't know what this is, it is the tiny spring attached to the balance wheel which supplies the regulating influence on the balance wheel. Allow me to explain:

About 3 years ago, when Breitling decided to convert to 100% COSC movements, they needed to change the hairspring to a temperature-compensated type in order to maintain accuracy over the temperature range imposed by COSC. But they also decided at the same time to improve the mechanical shock resistance of the hairspring, i.e., to make it more rugged. So they adopted a special alloy to accomplish this goal. The only real drawback is that this alloy does not reach its ultimate long-term temper until it has been exercised over a period of about 3 months. This is not a flaw in the alloy, it is simply a property of the alloy that must be accomodated.

This new hairspring is initially stiffer than a normal hairspring, but it will gradually soften a bit during the first few months of wear. This causes the natural resonant frequency (the oscillation rate at which the balance wheel/hairspring assembly "wants" to run at) to run a bit faster at first, but which will gradually slow down to the final rate which then causes the watch to be in compliance with COSC accuracy requirements. Since it is more desireable to have a watch that doesn't lose time, it is necessary to set the regulation a bit fast initially. In other words, if the watch were regulated to run initially at +2 sec/day (which is well within COSC) after the first few months, it would settle down to a rate which is in the negative portion of the COSC range. As this would be unacceptable to many Breitling owners, they decided to set it faster than watches with ordinary hairsprings. This way, after the break-in period the watch will slow a bit, but will remain on the positive side of the COSC range. Makes perfect sense when you think about it.

So if you've just bought a new Breitling be sure to give it a few months of daily wear before checking the accuracy. Never thought I'd believe or accept this, but now that I know the real reason for my watch initially running too fast, I am no longer unhappy about my experience with the Chrono SA. In fact, I am delighted that Breitling has addressed some very subtle issues with the hairspring.

This information came directly from Breitling SA and I trust you will all find it enlightening. And what really surprised me is that some people at Breitling regularly view comments on this forum about their watches, and they sincerely want their customers to be happy with their watches. They don't mind at all that there are negative comments from time to time, rather they welcome the opportunity to discover ways to improve their products by listening to what customers have to say. A real mind-blower in the face of accusations that they don't care what customers think. Quite the contrary -- they are "all ears", so to speak. And in my dealings with them, I have been continually impressed with just how responsive they actually are.
 

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I have just set my PO to the atomic clock and will measure the changes over the next 24hrs whilst this is happening it will be in its winder.
Rene Bos
 

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Theo Moore said:
Um why? Even when you sleep?
no shower because a hot tub can harm the seals. Yes even when I sleep I wear my watch so I am sure that the spring is fully wound so it ensures hat the winding mechanism is working efficiently and btw giving a stable accuracy.
 

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I haven't found much difference after a couple of weeks. Here's examples of my last three purchases.

Ball Fireman: out of the box +8 sec per day; settled to +7 after a fortnight, no change since;

Limes Klassik Cartouche: out of the box +4 sec per day, settled to +2 after a fortnight, no change since;

Omega Speedmaster Professional: out of the box +25 sec per day, settled to +24 after 3 weeks, no change since.
 
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G M Fude said:
I haven't found much difference after a couple of weeks. Here's examples of my last three purchases.

Ball Fireman: out of the box +8 sec per day; settled to +7 after a fortnight, no change since;

Limes Klassik Cartouche: out of the box +4 sec per day, settled to +2 after a fortnight, no change since;

Omega Speedmaster Professional: out of the box +25 sec per day, settled to +24 after 3 weeks, no change since.
Hey Steve,
I'm just curious - I know the Speedy Pro isn't a chronometer, but +24 sec/day is a lot. Do you have a local watchmaker that you trust who could regulate it for you? That watch can easily be brought down to COSC specs with proper regulation. You may be able to get it down to gaining just a couple of seconds a day rather than 24. Just a suggestion.

Cheers,
John
 

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Yes John, there's an old watchmaker who's an Omega AD about 20 minutes drive from me who has been in business a long time -- sold my mother an Omega DeVille in 1974. I will get down to see him one of these days!

I like the Speedy Pro because of its history, and it is such a good looking watch, easy to read, rugged... but you have to wonder how this one got past Omega's QC department. I was also less than impressed to see a very fine 4 mm long piece of lint at the top part of the dial, too. One of those things that took me a month to eventually notice it when the sunlight was shining just right on the face -- and now I see it all the time.

So, my first and definitely last Omega. (yes, pun on the brand name intended)
 
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G M Fude said:
Yes John, there's an old watchmaker who's an Omega AD about 20 minutes drive from me who has been in business a long time -- sold my mother an Omega DeVille in 1974. I will get down to see him one of these days!

I like the Speedy Pro because of its history, and it is such a good looking watch, easy to read, rugged... but you have to wonder how this one got past Omega's QC department. I was also less than impressed to see a very fine 4 mm long piece of lint at the top part of the dial, too. One of those things that took me a month to eventually notice it when the sunlight was shining just right on the face -- and now I see it all the time.

So, my first and definitely last Omega. (yes, pun on the brand name intended)
I hate to hear things like this, Steve. The lint on the dial of a brand new watch is just plain sloppy on Omega's part. If I were in your situation I'd send it to your Omega service center for warranty repairs. Since you can clearly point out the piece of lint to them, you can also complain about the poor timekeeping. I'm sure they would regulate the watch at no charge just to keep you happy. +24 sec/day is pitifully bad, even for a watch that isn't a certified chronometer.

Of course, if you feel more comfortable with your own watchmaker, then I can't blame you for letting him do the work, even though you'll pay out of pocket for it. Either way, I'm sorry to hear about this. <|
 

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I just put them on and wear them ... have never had one off timewise by much that I bothered to notice
I never place a watch in every gymnastic position known to man or beast either.
If it is off my wrist its usually for work related issue.
I additionally have never removed any of my watches(and I have used a few subs,super pro,PO.yawn) when showering
I may let it go on the extension and "hang" on my wrist for rub a dub dub
but thats it.
If its gonna leak over that it goes out the window.
 
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