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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone,

I'm sort of newish to the Seiko/Citizen thread, and lately I find myself interested in the Monster. The opinion in the forums generally seems positive, even though it is wound by shaking it...Is there any concern that shaking the watch would somehow be bad for the plastic parts in the movement over the long term?

I guess I'm just curious in general as to what concern the WIS here think about plastic in their movements. Still learning about how they work too, which is fascinating.
 

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I have both a black and orange Monster. I don't understand your concern about "shaking" them. I have worn them for everything I do and have had no problems. They are good rugged watches.
 

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Being a mechanical watch, I doubt there is much plastic, if any.. when we talk about shake to wind, we aren't taking like you want to shake it to death but more of a back and forth motion, like your stirring a drink. Either way, mechanical watches won't be as overall shock proof as a quartz but in the case of the monster, I'm sure it can take some serious blows before becoming damaged.
 

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plastic is a lot more resilient than you think. just look at the Glock firearms. Mostly plastic, but their guns are one of the most reliable out there. If you want to be more technical about it, just call it a polymer.
 

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Morgans have a wooden frame in an age of unibody constructions. Just because plastics are used doesn't necessarily mean it is a bad thing. Different plastics have different properties, and durability at a price point is what you are getting in the monster. As to what concern I have about the plastic in my monster. Not much if any, and it is my beater. At the price point if it does break I don't mind having it repaired or replacing it. That said I'm not wearing it while running a jack hammer or doing acid drops off the back of tractor trailers.
 

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There sure is...

The article below links to an article by The Purists. It contains a very detailed and elaborate dissection of the Monster. It contains about as much information as anybody would ever need to know about the Seiko Monster and the Seiko 7S26 movement, including the plastic parts.

The Seiko Diver's 200 Meter SKX779 Featuring the 7S26 Automatic Movement
I stand corrected I suppose. But back to the OP's concern, any normal shaking,vibration will not harm the watch. Now if you use a jackhammer for a living, that might be a different story.

Edit: After glancing over the article, for the most part the plastic parts mainly involve the day/date mechanisms, which is unlikely to be damaged by vibrations. However, could be if time adjustments are made during the wrong times of day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very informative look inside the 7S26!! Thanks for posting!
I agree!

To be honest I was kind of picturing the rattling around of parts if you shook it (wasn't sure how hard) instead of the gentle stirring that was mentioned. But the article definitely shows where the use of plastic actually demonstrates an advantage. If it's as rugged as others say it is then it seems almost too good to be true when you factor in the price. I know this isn't supposed to be an heirloom watch but I was just wondering if there were any concerns about how rough you all felt comfortable treating it. This is coming from someone who is not a diver, but has swam with a quartz in the past The idea of swimming with an automatic that doesn't cost a bazillion dollars is sort of new to me.
 

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In general, Most WIS'ers will tell you that as far as "heirloom" quality, mechanical watches are the way to go as they are more likely to be repairable vs. a quartz. As far as how "rough" I've yet to harm a mechanical but again, I'm not a WWF wrestler or Jackhammer-er...lol...
 

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Hi Everyone,

I'm sort of newish to the Seiko/Citizen thread, and lately I find myself interested in the Monster. The opinion in the forums generally seems positive, even though it is wound by shaking it...Is there any concern that shaking the watch would somehow be bad for the plastic parts in the movement over the long term?

I guess I'm just curious in general as to what concern the WIS here think about plastic in their movements. Still learning about how they work too, which is fascinating.
You do realize that the vast majority of those Swiss models with prices up to 1 million US$ or so (including most Rolex models, which in that equation are just a form of overpriced Swiss Seiko) are also automatic watches which are 'wound by shaking' (actually just wearing them work perfectly fine) ? :-d
 

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BTw, speaking of glocks and watches. have you guys ever worn your seiko automatics to the firing range? I've always made it a point to remove mine before heading to the firing line. Is this being overly cautious or will they stand up to the shock of firing a gun?
 

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BTw, speaking of glocks and watches. have you guys ever worn your seiko automatics to the firing range? I've always made it a point to remove mine before heading to the firing line. Is this being overly cautious or will they stand up to the shock of firing a gun?
I don't think you're overly cautious, I'm the same way. Why take an unnecessary risk to your watch? I wear a digital when firing or at the very least, a quartz analog.

Others will argue how soldiers in the older wars had only mechanicals and still shot their weapons with them with no problems. They failed to mention that they mostly shot from rifles and not handguns, so the recoil distribution is very different.
 

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Just to add my 2cts... I am very confident that 'shaking' the Monster will not harm it for the long term... especially where the 7S26 is concerned. This particular movement is used in tons of 'entry-level' Seiko automatics sold worldwide for many years now, with an excellent field record. However, you should not use it for eg., handling a jackhammer type activity for long periods. For that, I believe even a high end Swiss mecha. watch that costs 100 times more will be damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks everyone for taking seriously what probably seemed like an odd question. These forums are a goldmine for the uninformed. I'm probably going to make this my next purchase, and your responses definitely help.
 

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I wore my orange monster while operating a 8.5hp Briggs & Stratton powered snow thrower for 4 straight hours last week. No issues to report.
 
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