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It will have a 50-60 hour power reserve so leaving it overnight is fine. No shaking or winding will be needed unless you’re watching tv all day. Even a trIp to the kitchen for another bag of crisps will wind it. I have sedentary days now and then and the watch has never stopped.
 

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An Omega AD once told me that automatic watches are primarily designed to be wound by the rotor, and that you should try to avoid winding it manually if possible. He seemed to think that manual winding was a back up, and too much manual winding wasn't good for the watch.
Mind you I've been told all sorts of b******s by ADs, so not sure whether to believe that or not :)
 

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I have read from many websites and forums that say 'shaking your automatic watch is safe to do', as long as you don't do it violently. BUT, I would like to know from those Omega experts on this forum: Is it okay (or safe on the METAS movement) to shake the watch after waking up in the morning...or before sleeping...about 60 to 120 times in a back and forth manner (like swinging your arms in a jogging motion) to "prime" the watch for the day (or night)? I found that by gently shaking my watch, it gains a bit of time, sometimes up to +1 second or a bit more.

Thanks for your expertise and knowledge, all!

Kind regards
Louis
I swirl mine sometimes in the evening around 10-20 times and it's fine. Why? I don't want to unscrew it every few days to wind it. Due to Covid I've been working from home so I'm not that active and few times it stopped. Can't be bothered with winder.

With regards to shaking or shocks. I had mine few times when I rode a bike in city so jumping from curbs on a road, pot holes nothing extreme like off road. No changes in accuracy, everything fine.
 

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I've exposed my Omega's (metas certified) watches to vigorous 'shaking' wrist movements, whilst enjoying some personal 'me' time.
Never had any detrimental effect on the watch, or it's time keeping! ;)
 

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Always thought of you as being one. 🤦‍♂️
I was prepared for somebody to make that comment, and I'm not surprised that person is you. 'Takes one to know one'! :LOL:
 

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An Omega AD once told me that automatic watches are primarily designed to be wound by the rotor, and that you should try to avoid winding it manually if possible. He seemed to think that manual winding was a back up, and too much manual winding wasn't good for the watch.
Mind you I've been told all sorts of b******s by ADs, so not sure whether to believe that or not :)
As you suspect, AD's often know little about what they sell from a technical standpoint. Sire they know product codes, pricing, etc, but they are not watchmakers. I can assure you that using the crown to wind your watch is just fine.

If you don't want to believe a watchmaker, then just read the manual that came with your watch. If winding it via the crown was something that would cause problems, they would tell you that in the manual. I think you will find it's the opposite.
 

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As you suspect, AD's often know little about what they sell from a technical standpoint. Sire they know product codes, pricing, etc, but they are not watchmakers. I can assure you that using the crown to wind your watch is just fine.

If you don't want to believe a watchmaker, then just read the manual that came with your watch. If winding it via the crown was something that would cause problems, they would tell you that in the manual. I think you will find it's the opposite.
Thanks for the reply.
That’s good to know. I enjoy hand winding my watches as it reminds me of my dad doing it with his watch when I was a kid, and I enjoy the physical interaction with the watch.
 

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1. I’ve been a watch collector for almost 25 years.
2. I sold 22 different Swiss watch brands for 11 years (2001-2012).
3. I’ve been working in wristwatch after-sales for the past 5 years and I work alongside the watchmaker.
In all those years, I have never been told by any watchmaker, sales representative, brand manager or customer that shaking a watch was the way to either get it started or prime it for running overnight. If you’ve worn the watch all day, it will easily last overnight. If you haven’t worn the watch that day, then just wind it by hand, ten or fifteen turns of the crown at an even pace. Show the watch some care and respect. Interact with it, to remind yourself of why you spent all that money in the first place. This is why I don’t believe in watch winders. It would be like owning a Porsche and having a chauffeur drive it.
Shaking is for Margaritas, not wristwatches.
5. And, of course, Archer is correct.
 

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Not to appear contradicting to the actual good advice from Archer and others, etc.

But I think some people here might be overthinking the word 'shaking' here. When I 'shake' my automatics, it is a really gentle side to side or swirling motion. Probably applying less force than actually wearing the watch and doing some sort of activity. I sometimes prefer that than unscrewing the crown because it's much faster and easier. (Not because I'm afraid of damaging the crown, etc)

Like, lifting my hand up to quickly scratch an itch on my head 'shakes' the watch more than my Seiko Shuffles. Giving someone a high five (pre-covid of course) probably puts more force onto the watch.

At the end of the day, I think people might be OVERLY cautious on both ends. These watches are designed to be enjoyed and wound from the movements of your wrist naturally. If you're stressing out or worrying you're damaging the watch from a few shakes, or from damaging the watch by unscrewing the crown/winding it manually, then you're probably not enjoying the watch as much as you could. Don't abuse the watch, but you don't need to baby them either.

These kinds of questions remind me of the common "can I keep my chronograph running?" / "How often can I use my chronograph functions without damaging the watch?" Moving mechanical parts will always have small amounts of wear, and need to be serviced at some point. Functions / complications designed to be used CAN be used when you want! (mind blown)

I mean, I also don't drive my car because I'm afraid of wearing out the tires, transmission, engine, etc. And I prefer to never reach the point where I have to service my car. /s
 
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Not to appear contradicting to the actual good advice from Archer and others, etc.

But I think some people here might be overthinking the word 'shaking' here. When I 'shake' my automatics, it is a really gentle side to side or swirling motion. Probably applying less force than actually wearing the watch and doing some sort of activity. I sometimes prefer that than unscrewing the crown because it's much faster and easier. (Not because I'm afraid of damaging the crown, etc)

Like, lifting my hand up to quickly scratch an itch on my head 'shakes' the watch more than my Seiko Shuffles. Giving someone a high five (pre-covid of course) probably puts more force onto the watch.

At the end of the day, I think people might be OVERLY cautious on both ends. These watches are designed to be enjoyed and wound from the movements of your wrist naturally. If you're stressing out or worrying you're damaging the watch from a few shakes, or from damaging the watch by unscrewing the crown/winding it manually, then you're probably not enjoying the watch as much as you could. Don't abuse the watch, but you don't need to baby them either.

These kinds of questions remind me of the common "can I keep my chronograph running?" / "How often can I use my chronograph functions without damaging the watch?" Moving mechanical parts will always have small amounts of wear, and need to be serviced at some point. Functions / complications designed to be used CAN be used when you want! (mind blown)

I mean, I also don't drive my car because I'm afraid of wearing out the tires, transmission, engine, etc. And I prefer to never reach the point where I have to service my car. /s
Shake or swirl - doesn't really matter. There's no need to do this instead of using the crown, unless you have a watch like a cheaper Seiko that can't be manually wound.

You mention it being "faster" but in almost all watches that can be manually wound, turning the crown one turn is like doing more winding than turning the rotor many turns. So when looked at from an efficiency point of view, it's most certainly not faster to put a given number of turns on the mainspring.

Again, if people want to do the shake/swirl, go right ahead - it's your watch. It just doesn't make a lot of sense compared to using the crown for what it was designed to do.
 

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Shaking the watch can cause timing to change, which was the original concern you had, the answer is simple. Stop shaking it. Or don’t...up to you.
I'm a bit confused by this statement. If shaking the watch can cause timing issues wouldn't everyone wearing an automatic watch have timing issues? After all, many people wear their watches when they go bowling, skiing, playing golf, jogging, etc. Isn't that, in essence, the same thing as "Shaking" your watch?
 

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Well, your wearing habits definitely figure into the rate the watch will have on your wrist. And you can have it adjusted for that. The manufacturer tries to make the watch rate as independent as possible of the watch orientation (with respect to gravity), the watch temperature, the winding state and balance amplitude, but the watch rate still does depend a little bit on these things. The amplitude is probably what you are influencing most when moving with the watch on your wrist, and even more so when you are giving it a shake or swirl.

Should you manage to get the watch outside of normal operating parameters, for example by rotating it so vigorously that the balance rotates close to 360 degrees in one direction and the impulse jewel hits the escapement lever from behind, you can change the momentary rate of your watch by a lot. It could gain several seconds within a very short time.
 

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I'm a bit confused by this statement. If shaking the watch can cause timing issues wouldn't everyone wearing an automatic watch have timing issues? After all, many people wear their watches when they go bowling, skiing, playing golf, jogging, etc. Isn't that, in essence, the same thing as "Shaking" your watch?
The balance (oscillator) inside the movement can be affected by external forces. Any time the balance is disturbed, timing changes until the balance recovers it's normal rate.

Everyday as you wear a watch, the balance is being disturbed at various times, but how that affects or doesn't affect timing depends a lot on the magnitude, direction, and duration of the disturbance. In most everyday random movements, the disturbances will be minor in length, and will often essentially cancel themselves out over the course of the day. It's possible that you can be adding to the balance amplitude if the movements you make are in the same direction as the movement of the balance at that moment. This can cause rebanking, which is a condition of excessive amplitude that results in a very fast rate (I've seen rebanking cause rates of well over 999 seconds fast per day, which is the limit my timing machine will display).

When you shake a watch to wind it, doing to horizontally so that the rotor can swirl around, it's more likely to be affecting the balance in a way that imparts extra amplitude. The fact that it's being done for an extended period of time means that this can cause the watch to run very fast for that time, leading to enough gain to be noticeable.
 
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