WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This question has probably been asked a thousand times. Now it'll be 1001 times.

I purchased a new watch from an AD that has a manufacture COSC movement. After only a couple of days, it's running pretty steady at -4.5 spd, which is barely outside of COSC standards. The watch comes with a 5 year warranty. For such a simple thing, I'm tempted to take it to my local watchmaker and have him regulate the thing, but that violates the warranty. If I send it to the service center for regulation, I'm sure it'll be gone for several weeks. This is a difficult to find watch. I could also return it and ask for a new one, but that would probably be a 3-4 week wait.

A few questions:
If I use the local watchmaker, and the watch subsequently needs repair, could the service center tell it had been opened?

If it were you, would you risk violating the warranty and have it regulated locally, or would you return it to the service center?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
If it bugs you enough that you can stand being without for a few weeks to a few months, however unlikely, then obviously send it in and get peace of mind. If not, live with it and see how it develops after more than just a few days. In other words, give it some time. And is that deviation on wrist or static? Because practically speaking, on wrist performance is the only thing that should matter in real life ownership. On spec is what you buy, but on wrist is what you live with.

If it's new and under warranty, I frankly wouldn't screw around with an independent watchmaker for such a trivial thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,599 Posts
This question has probably been asked a thousand times. Now it'll be 1001 times.

I purchased a new watch from an AD that has a manufacture COSC movement. After only a couple of days, it's running pretty steady at -4.5 spd, which is barely outside of COSC standards. The watch comes with a 5 year warranty. For such a simple thing, I'm tempted to take it to my local watchmaker and have him regulate the thing, but that violates the warranty. If I send it to the service center for regulation, I'm sure it'll be gone for several weeks. This is a difficult to find watch. I could also return it and ask for a new one, but that would probably be a 3-4 week wait.

A few questions:
If I use the local watchmaker, and the watch subsequently needs repair, could the service center tell it had been opened?

If it were you, would you risk violating the warranty and have it regulated locally, or would you return it to the service center?
A COSC-certified movement is tested for 15 days. A couple days on the wrist or what have you doesn't mean it's off.

Bedsides, COSC certification is on the movement only so it doesn't mean your assembled watch will adhere to the same, exact standards.

That said, I would send it to a service centre if the watch continues to perform out of spec. I did, with some of my Rolex/Tudor purchases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,561 Posts
Would one minute slow over 2 weeks really worry you??

If so then get the manufacturer to look at it, but it’s mechanical, so it will probably come back running +2/3spd fast instead.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Most watches that are tested to COSC specs are uncased movements and are tested in 5 different positions over several days, when you wear a watch lots of things come into play like gravity, temperature, humidity etc... plus this is a relatively new piece and needs time to break in.

My Rolex when first getting gained 7 SPD and was consistent and it bugged me so I sent it to RSC and I assume they regulated it as now it gains only 4 SPD, new Rolex standards are +/- 2 SPD and mine falls under those new standards and at first I thought I was going to send it in again but then I thought ok send it in and have it regulated and possibly get closer to the +/- 2 but is it worth it for 15 secs per week improvement and I have decided not, maybe when I get closer to my warranty expiration I might consider it but currently not worth it.

Remember there are 86,400 secs in a day and yours is only off by 4.5 secs or just over 30 secs a week so my suggestion is to give it some time to see where it settles down at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
It's all up to you, maybe you purchased that watch because of the COSC, if that is the case, go send it in since it's under warranty. Do no risk it outside the warranty. Personally, it seems to be not much of a problem for me. I'd go and live with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,476 Posts
As you have previously mentioned in a prior post, you will be 'cutting Tudor some slack and wait until it breaks in a bit longer'. I would do the same as well, that is, to give itself time to break itself in because the watch may have been sitting still for a period of time.

As for your two questions:
Q1. If I use the local watchmaker, and the watch subsequently needs repair, could the service center tell it had been opened?
A1. I would say it is a, yes. The service centre should be able to tell if it was open by an independent watchmaker not sanctioned by Tudor to work on their watches.

Q2. If it were you, would you risk violating the warranty and have it regulated locally, or would you return it to the service center?
A2. No. I would not risk having the warranty voided because it was regulated locally by a non-authorized independent watchmaker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,345 Posts
If it's not broken don't fix it.

COSC is uncased, off wrist, in multiple SET positions. Cased, on wrist, in motion while being worn will definitely cause a variation. After a couple of days the watch also hasn't "settled" yet, so I really don't think what you're currently seeing is representative of where the watch will be in a couple of months.

I'd give it some time. You've got 5 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
857 Posts
Q1. If I use the local watchmaker, and the watch subsequently needs repair, could the service center tell it had been opened?
A1. I would say it is a, yes. The service centre should be able to tell if it was open by an independent watchmaker not sanctioned by Tudor to work on their watches.
Interesting. How would manufacturer know if it was opened and regulated by indie watchmaker or by authorised. Assuming indie watchmaker knows how to open particular watch and have set of correct tools.

To answer OP question - give it a month and then check accuracy again. If it still bother you then ask watchmaker. I'd go local, because of that would certainly be much quicker than sending watch away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,375 Posts
To answer OP question - give it a month and then check accuracy again.
^^^^ this. My most recent watch (Damasko DK105) arrived running +6 or so a day, but after 6 weeks or so of cumulative wearing now runs around +2 to 3/day. Now, given that your watch is COSC it already has been running for at least 15 days, but I'd suggest giving it a while longer.

There are many reports here on WUS by owners who sent new watches in for regulation and they returned running well but with finish issues - dirt on the dial, scratches on bezel/case. Do you want to risk that for a few seconds a day? [Edit - I see Nokie already gave you this advice in a much clearer way].

Please keep us informed how things turn out. Best of luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,296 Posts
It would have to have a much bigger accuracy issue than 4-5 seconds before I would even start to worry about regulating it.

Too easy to mess up an already good thing if you try to fix something that is not broken, IMHO.
Yes, this. Like my late Daddy used to say, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
Joe
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
So if measured per COSC, it may actually be inside of COSC accuracy tolerances?
And you expect me to know the answer to this? Maybe, maybe not. The only way to know would be to take the movement out of the case, yes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,189 Posts
And you expect me to know the answer to this? Maybe, maybe not. The only way to know would be to take the movement out of the case, yes?
If you have a timegrapher, you could time it in the 5 positions, take the average, and know what the average rate is for the assembled watch at room temperature, and position variance.

The COSC -4/+6 is AVERAGE rate across 5 positions. Assuming you wear your watch on your left wrist, it likely spends most time 12 down, crown down, and face up. Not sure what position you rest it in while you sleep. The average of those positions it spends most time in is apparently just out of COSC, but if you factor the other 2 (face down, crown up) into the average, it may pull you back into COSC range.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
I think the general consensus is that the technical risk-reward ratio for any kind of service action is unfavorable. I think this is reasonable.

This leaves the decision to be based on the technical risk against your dissatisfaction with the watch falling out of the COSC specification by 0.5 seconds per day. Let me say that again, one half of one second per day. And on a watch that arguably may not have fully setted in to your pattern of wear.

This is the choice in front of you. In my view, it's an absurd choice to even be considering. In this situation, there is most definitely value in remembering the adage "just wear it."

Note: I'd also add that unless you are very, very sure of the precision of your time deviation measurement (and not on a TimeGrapher as you state this is on-wrist performance), 500 milliseconds is probably close to your error of measurement. Which means that there is a reasonable likelihood that the half-second overage may not even be real.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,839 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I didn't want to mention the brand, but it's a Tudor.Black Bay 41 GMT. I should have stated at the beginning of the thread I was going to give it time to settle in before I made a decision on what to do. Based on other threads about Tudor manufacture accuracy, mine would be bottom of the barrel if it remains -4.5 spd. One of the reasons I got it in the first place, was their reputation for accuracy. I'm more than willing to pay to have it regulated to better performance. I'm satisfied with everything else about the watch. I'm a bit OCD about accuracy. That's the engineer in me. I realize everyone's not wired the same as me.

I don't have a timegrapher. I am tracking performance using the WatchTracker app on my iPhone.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top