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Though not a prime interest of mine, I've always been fond of nice mechanical stopwatches. And a few years ago I acquired this nice Royal Navy veteran.





Any other enthusiasts here? Pictures are of course most welcome... :)
 

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I had a similar Lemania split-timer:




Now the only thing is that, at some point in the late 1960s/early 1970s, Lemania stopped producing their own beautiful in-house 19 line movement - like the one Pascal has - and instead opted for the Valjoux cal. 57 (which Lemania branded as the Lemania cal. 1985). This movement was also used in Heuer split-timers of the same era (I don't remember what calibre Heuer named it as).




The one timer that I have kept, and that I hold on to dearly is a New Old Stock Lemania timer issued by the A.E.R.E. (the UK Atomic Energy Research Institute). If it was ever used, it was only used sparingly. What's so incredible about this find is that it includes *factory* papers in duplicata.

Don't take my word for it - here's a little Lemania horological striptease:

 

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Any other enthusiasts here? Pictures are of course most welcome... :)
Nice lemania's overhere....

Here is a Russian (Soviet) split second. These were made by Slava or 2nd Moscow Watch Factory between the early 60's untill the late 80's.

There were three versions. A normal slow beat with 60 seconds/rotation dial, a extreme high beat with a 1 second/rotation dial,
and the one shown below , a high beat (36.000 bph) with a 30 seconds/rotation dial.

This model was the most popular and used in many both civil as well as military applications.
It was also standard equipment on board the Soyuz spacecraft during the 70's and 80's.



regards

Tammo
 

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Nice lemania's overhere....

Here is a Russian (Soviet) split second. These were made by Slava or 2nd Moscow Watch Factory between the early 60's untill the late 80's.
Here's mine - a Slava as well. :)

Great pics, guys! I've often wondered about the movement in these Slava timers... in terms of their design and the execution of the chrono function, they look very similar to the Lemania cal. 24 movements (which were also used by Omega). Countless varieties of the cal. 24 existed for a host of different timing needs. Here are some 24 line movements that I photographed at the Omega museum in Bienne last December.





 
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