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I like the dress watch I don't dislike the diver it just seems as you said busy.

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The pulse-meter instead of a second hand allows the wearer to establish pulse rate without having to wait for a single second hand to hit even a 5-minute marker and then remember that start point while counting off pulses. Easier said than done in a high-stress situation. As designed, you wait until one hand reaches 12 then count 15 pulses and read the p/m rate on the dial. You can also fixate on the position any of the four hands as you start counting, then stop when the next "rotor" hand hits that mark (X4 and that's your rate p/m). Either way precious seconds or tens of seconds are saved and the chance of miscounting greatly reduced.

It is rather odd looking but knowing the functionality makes it less so.

I like it, also how the Platinum 10 mins and Golden Hour indicators were done, despite the fact that neither is 100% rock-solid medical science so designing them into a watch is a little bit fanciful of Sinn.
 

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Thanks for the explain action kannome, I like the look of the piece plus that it can be a additional tool on the hand of the right person...thumbs up to Sinn...it would have a following I imagine within emergency services, like purchasers who at sometime would utilise the features of the EM7...all the best Dave
 

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I love the fact it's designed to wash blood, etc. off for EMTs. They think of everything there at Sinn.
 

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The 4 second hands also mimic helicopter rotors, since it was made for the helicopter flight EMT crew. So it's a super functional anesthetic piece. If only it didn't cost 3300.......

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I actually know a physician who uses this, says he pulls off rubber strap after every shift and washes off all the germs.

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One of the worst things medical staff can do is wearing a wristwatch, because in all these little gaps there is a lot of space for bacteria and other germs. This is the only watch I know to be sterilised. I don't want to have the surgeons Rolex in my abdomen...

Edit: There is also the St. Gallen Horology desinfactable series.
 

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One of the worst things medical staff can do is wearing a wristwatch, because in all these little gaps there is a lot of space for bacteria and other germs. This is the only watch I know to be sterilised. I don't want to have the surgeons Rolex in my abdomen...

Edit: There is also the St. Gallen Horology desinfactable series.
The biggest problem with contamination is the strap. It's easy to clean a watch with a rubber or plastic strap, and easier still with a steel bracket. NATOs and leather straps -- anything porous -- will be difficult to disinfect. I shower with my watch on, and if it gets too funky I'll clean it under the sink with dish soap.

Most of the ER docs I work with wear divers with steel bracelets, while most of us in the field (fire/SAR/paramedic) wear a gshock, Ironman, or equivalent.


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