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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my MB II back from Bremont a few days ago after its second stint there for warranty repairs.

I know they are made by human beings, and things can go wrong and the service from all involved was excellent, so no complaints there.

The date adjusting function jammed twice, if you must know...

I'm just hoping nothing else goes wrong with it now.

But in describing the watch to a Non-WIS friend who is just at the beginning of possibly becoming one, he asked what was special about it.

I described the history of the model and the company catch phrase of "Tested Beyong Endurance".

He then asked "So how many G will it take?"

I couldn't recall off the top of my head, so I went to the web site and looked around.

I had assumed more than 10G as that is what an ejection seat can generate.

I found the answer in Bremont's description of anti-shock.

It will take a hammer blow at 4.4m/s which simulates dropping it from 1m onto a wooden floor.

Kinda underwhelming given the back-story of the model.

I still love the watch & think it looks great, but some of the lustre of the thing has been diminished a tad.

Am I wrong or does this seem rather ordinary and not really beyond endurance at all?
 

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I mean Bremont is a great watch. I have met Nick and Giles in person and they are great chaps. But the watch has no real "history" or "story" as of yet. The brand is still new. Also sure the MBII will survive an ejection but honestly speaking if you want something that is unbrakeable, you're better off wearing a Gshock....If you like the look of it great, thats what matters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I mean Bremont is a great watch. I have met Nick and Giles in person and they are great chaps. But the watch has no real "history" or "story" as of yet. The brand is still new. Also sure the MBII will survive an ejection but honestly speaking if you want something that is unbrakeable, you're better off wearing a Gshock....If you like the look of it great, thats what matters.
I've got the G-Shock and I like it and it has its place.

As I said, I was just disillusioned after reading the back story about the first MB Bremonts only going to pilots who had survived an ejection on one of Britain's pioneering lifesaving devices

It was a little piece of aviation history that appealed to me as a lad ( read "Man in the Hot Seat" - great book) so the raison d'être for the MB II really struck a chord with me when I was investigating a purchase.

The hyperbole of the watch's manufacturers was neither here nor there when it was released.

They also were receiving a LOT of press about the rebirth of English watchmaking and similar hype.

I didn't seriously look into one until I saw an MB II in the flesh with the orange centre case secion.

It had a lot more prexence than any of the photos had hinted at.

It sort of used an understated loudness if that makes any sense.

So I looked into them a bit and the oft repeated catch-cry was the extraordinary lengths that Bremont had taken to make this watch as robust as it was possible to make a purely mechanical watch. Tested beyong endurance they said over & over.

All that taken together impressed me and I acquired one.

As soon as it arrived I loved it.

As mentioned above it has had a chequered past, with two warranty problems . Which is only something I have experienced once before in over 60 watches in the collection.

To their credit, Bremont were great to deal with in fixing it both times, as mentioned above and elsewhere.

It was just that in explaining the watch to a fellow watch appreciator that the "beyond endurance" turned out to be 1 metre to a floor.

Granted, that might well kill many of my collection, and I would not do that to any except the G-Shock to test it out.

It was more that the truth was, Bremont seemed, at first, to be focused on elegantly engineered solutions to problems first & foremost and advertising hyperbole second.

Reading the 4.4m/s showed that they are as much entwined in that world as those who have celebriies holding there products up to the camera.

The spiel only goes so far as saying that they test their watches in the same exacting way that Martin Baker tests their ejection seats. It doesn't actually say they will survive the 10G-odd forces of an ejection. The video for the MB III is somewhat more misleading. The watch features pop up in read, the ejection seat is the focus of the video. It never says the watch was worn or tested in the circumstances the seats are.

I do undertsand that the M-B Ejection seat is a crucial piece of safety equipment that MUST function perfectly first time or someone may die. If the ejector has his watch stop at the end of that it's still a win. If my watch hits the floor, I will be annoyed and out of pocket if is damaged, so the two are very different things. I get that.

I have written to them to ask for some technical feedback & will keep folks appraised.

At this moment I am wearing and still loving the look & feel of the watch. However some of that magical connection with a lirrle piece of aviation history may well have disappeared.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The nice people at Bremont sent me back some information.

It is still in the form of an advertising brochure, but explains somewhat fully what they are doing.

I'm somewhat mollified now.

The Shock Resistance is the bearing mounts on the balnce wheel shaft incablock and the like - there version of it is unspecified.

That is the bit that is taking the 1 metre fall.

Around that the mount of the movement nto the case via their patented rubber shock absoption system adds more shock resistance.

This is supposed to go through the same moisture, vibration and shock tests as a Martin Baker ejection seat. This means that it will theoretically take loads up to 30g for periods of about 0.2 of a second

I'm still curious as to what their tests involve and have asked one of their boffins to explain further and will report back any details

In the meantime, I guess I'm not disillusioned now, just curious :)
 

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The test you are Describing is ISO 1413. The acceleration on the watch = approximately 5000 Gs. Good enough?

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The test you are Describing is ISO 1413. The acceleration on the watch = approximately 5000 Gs. Good enough?

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Ah- Ha!

Something definitive!

Thanks for that!

Still got nothing but brochure waffle from Bremobt, which was fine, but not what I'd asked them.

A number and ISo is pretty clear cut

Appreciate the post ;)
 

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Ah- Ha!

Something definitive!

Thanks for that!

Still got nothing but brochure waffle from Bremobt, which was fine, but not what I'd asked them.

A number and ISo is pretty clear cut

Appreciate the post ;)
You are welcome. It's a standard test for shock resistance on watches. Passing it puts Bremont on the same level of shock resistance as a Seiko dive watch, or pretty much any modern ETA movement. Their waffling is because they're not exactly touting a level of shock resistance that is extraordinary.


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I got my MB II back from Bremont a few days ago after its second stint there for warranty repairs.

I know they are made by human beings, and things can go wrong and the service from all involved was excellent, so no complaints there.

The date adjusting function jammed twice, if you must know...

I'm just hoping nothing else goes wrong with it now.

But in describing the watch to a Non-WIS friend who is just at the beginning of possibly becoming one, he asked what was special about it.

I described the history of the model and the company catch phrase of "Tested Beyong Endurance".

He then asked "So how many G will it take?"

I couldn't recall off the top of my head, so I went to the web site and looked around.

I had assumed more than 10G as that is what an ejection seat can generate.

I found the answer in Bremont's description of anti-shock.

It will take a hammer blow at 4.4m/s which simulates dropping it from 1m onto a wooden floor.

Kinda underwhelming given the back-story of the model.

I still love the watch & think it looks great, but some of the lustre of the thing has been diminished a tad.

Am I wrong or does this seem rather ordinary and not really beyond endurance at all?
I'd be disillusioned by the fact that the malfunctioning date adjust betrays Bremont's catch phrase. Kind of like someone putting on their resume that one of their qualities is great attention to detail while there are numerous mis-spellings throughout their resume.



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I'd like to get to the bottom of this, I have an SM500 so same movement and shock protection as the OP's MBii.

We all know that Bremont use a modified ETA movement in these watches but what Bremont don't tll us is how much modification they do.

So if a "standard" ETA conforms to ISO 1413, where acceleration on the watch = approximately 5000 Gs and given Bremonts mods to the movement and their patented anti-shock rubber mount surely it should follow that a Bremont "tested beyond endurance" piece will out perform ISO 1413? Or does it??

Perhaps the OP could follow up his correspondence with Bremont and ask if the watch exceeds the ISO benchmark. If it does then it justifies the hype. If not, well .........
 
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