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Are SLR cameras obsolete? The cameras in smart phones are so good these days, that I think for the majority of the population having an SLR is a moot point... comments... opinions!
 

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I think it depends on who you're talking to. People who are more into the intricacies of photography might still prefer a DSLR or something with changeable lenses.

I have a DSLR that I don't use much anymore because I've lost my connection to photography lately. However, if I were to take it up again, I love that extra surface and heft in my hand of having a physical shutter button to press and a lens to hold and adjust. I love the physical feedback of the shutter button and the satisfying "click" of the shutter actuating. Having interchangeable lenses helps too. I can increase the focal length and other variables without sacrificing photo quality.

However, if I were just walking around and didn't want to carry a bunch of heavy gear with me, I'd probably be okay with my phone's camera. Or I'll bring my Fuji x100s. Maybe I'm more traditional, but the feel of a camera in my hands plays into the experience of photography.

Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
 

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With phones you have fixed focal length and aperture, they perform worse than DSLRs in low light situations and shoot in jpg which is not so good for editing compared to RAW, but are smaller and lighter than DSLRS. On the other hand DSLRs are bigger, hevier, expensive, require good glass, tripod and remote (for landscapes) and some knowledge on how to use them. In other words if you want creative freedom use DSLR, for everything else your phone is good enough.
 

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A phone camera will almost never replace a DSLR due to the smaller image sensor and limited features.
The only camera out there that could make a DSLR obsolete would be a mirrorless camera, but even that would come with some drawbacks.
Drawbacks include limited lens selection(unless it is micro 4/3), smaller grip, and generally more expensive.

Aside from that they are almost equal to if not better than comparable DSLR cameras.
Right now Mirrorless cameras are still not in the same level as Canon or Nikon, but 5 or 10 years from now that could change.
 

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Dslr is obsolete but not replaced by phones. Micro 4/3 has reached a level that the size advantage has past the quality gap. Phones are just good post processing suites that make good pics easier
 

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A microscopic sensor with low bit depth and limited color space is no match for a professional camera, don't believe the hype.
 

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Just as 35mm SLR's made better photos than the much more convenient point-and-shoot cameras, modern digital SLR's will make a better photo than whatever is in your camera. BUT, for many people, what is in your camera MAY be sufficient for your needs.

I used to collect 35mm cameras, and have roughly 100, mostly old rangefinders, but quite a few SLR's too. Nowadays it's just so easy to use the phone, since I have it with me anyway.
 

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SLRs are still by far the best option for professional photography. I did wedding photography for a few years and my full frame Nikon setup did a great job providing the quality, range and flexibility that I needed.
 

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I can't approach the picture quality of my dSLR with my phone.
I've really really tried to take satisfying pics with the phone... it's so handy!

I guess I just lack the proper skill to use the phone.
 

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I use a "bridge camera" for both vacations and watch photography. Basically a glorified P&S with good photo, macro, and zoom (40X optical) capabilities. Canon SX40 HS. It also has a rather rare feature I demand for watch photography, but I also not find super handy on vacation - a flip out screen. I can shoot over crowds with ease. Hold the cam directly overhead and filp the screen so it is pointing directly down. I can see my shot perfectly and no one is in the way simply by looking up at the screen.
 

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They're tools for different purposes. A phone will never replace a DSLR and vice versa. The speed, durability, clean image files in really lowlight, lens flexibility, ability to print BIG and bokeh will always be a DSLR's advantage. Macro shots for watches are still best done by DSLRs because they have far lesser image distortion compared to the macro shots of naturally wide angle phone cams.
 

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I agree that a phone will likely never replace a SLR with variety of quality lenses. I shoot full frame with wide angle lenses 12-24mm lens for work as a real estate agent. My iPhone cannot get wide enough to shoot many of shots that I need for work. The other area where the phone cannot replace DSLR is in low light dusk shots. Tonight, I was shooting a home in twilight conditions on tripod with no flash. The shot came out beautifully. With my iPhone, it would just have been dark image. The other area where iPhone falls short is in trying to capture bokeh for portraits.
 

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Definitely not.
For every photo that makes me think my iPhone 7+ can replace my DSLR, there are 2 more that make me doubt it. With the right lens on a DSLR, I can worry about framing and look, not what random grainy ISO the phone decided to choose. If you only ever shot outside on sunny days, a phone could replace a DSLR, but if you want to shoot indoors, at night, wildlife, sports, etc a phone cannot compete, and they really aren't competing. Most people would not being buying DSLR's if there phone didn't have a camera, they would be buying $100 point & shoots. For me, I use my camera to capture memories, and I want to take high quality photos that are as "future-proof" as possible, my phone is great for spontaneous moments, and that is sufficient for most people, but I find it often leaves a lot to be desired.
 

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My iPhone 7+ has allowed me to leave my Nikon at home when doing things like visiting museums, taking the kids to see dolphins, etc. It will never replace the DSLR for low light, professional photography, or even capturing important events.
 

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The answer is it depends. If you are doing a general point-and-shoot or wide angle landscape shot, a smartphone camera will do fine, especially if it is an Android with manual controls for ISO. But if you want to take macro shots, get high-quality lume shots and just want to be able to control for focal point and aperture, only a DSLR or high-quality mirrorless camera such as the Sony A6000 (which I own) will do. And many point-and-shoots with higher end features such as the Sony RX1000 will rival smartphones.
 

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SLRs, by definition (but perhaps not common understanding), have a large flapping mirror between the lens and the sensor and they have almost unquestionably been rendered obsolete by the new Sony A9. I doubt we'll be seeing mirrors in cameras in 3-4 years.

Many people though equate interchangeable lens with SLR. 'Real' cameras are in no way endangered by phone cameras for anything beyond casual happy snaps.
 

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SLRs, by definition (but perhaps not common understanding), have a large flapping mirror between the lens and the sensor and they have almost unquestionably been rendered obsolete by the new Sony A9. I doubt we'll be seeing mirrors in cameras in 3-4 years.

Many people though equate interchangeable lens with SLR. 'Real' cameras are in no way endangered by phone cameras for anything beyond casual happy snaps.
I've heard the "SLRs will be dead in a few years" line a few times before...

Modern EVIL cameras can do a lot of what people used to use SLRs for and they offer definite benefits for the design of short lenses. However, the metering, autofocus and viewfinder being independent of the imaging sensor in an SLR give significant benefits for some uses, e.g. in speed for sports shooting.
 

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Check out the A9 mate - SLRs are now obsolete. 693 point phase detect focus system, and can focus 60 times per second. It can shoot 20fps with no viewfinder blackout. With these sorts of advances in electronics, the mirror itself is now redundant. Sure, I like an optical viewfinder, but the electronic ones are getting pretty good.
 
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