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Discussion Starter #1
At 38mm without the pendant this is the smallest fusee watch I own. I just finished restoring it. Many thanks to members radger and Joe Horner for helping sort out a tricky problem :-!.

It came without crystal, minute hand and wasn't working. The basic problems were a missing impulse jewel and cracked hole jewel in the potence. After fixing the movement I made a new minute hand, put a new acrylic crystal and here are the results.



Here is the 7 jewel movement.



I never polish the case on these. The case was dismantled, all the steel parts had some tea :-d, case was thoroughly cleaned and then reassembled.


Birmingham 1886


Since there is no seconds hand it has half minute marks.


Kind regards

Aditya
 

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Nice work Aditya,
I see the regulator is set pretty much in the middle,so plenty of life left in this old timer?
 

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A gread job on a smal watch :)
It's a pleasure for me to see that you rescue with much effort a ladys watch.

Kind regards Silke
Thanks, I love these old fusees!

Nice work Aditya,
I see the regulator is set pretty much in the middle,so plenty of life left in this old timer?
Thanks! I have not tested it fully yet. So far -30 secs in 15 hours. The amplitude is good and all the holes were in good condition. So I am hopeful. Of course, now that it is in my care it will be regularly serviced!

Kind regards

Aditya
 

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I am impressed. Kudos to you
adam
 

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Nice work on this old watch Aditya and great to see it brought back to life.
I think that this watch has seen little use and is in very nice condition.

Did you count the number of service marks on the case?

I just cleared my 1838 Arnold and Dent fusee from my bench and that old watch has been well used,
very well used, the case has numerous service marks fifteen or more.

It interested me to delve into areas usualy unseen, when working on that old watch.
The numerous repairs, made by long since gone watchmakers, one of whom had rebushed a hole slightly
off center and had punched it over leaving three tiny pock marks on the plate as a tell tale.

The 'pigs ear' gouges under the balance cock left as some repairman had adjusted the endshake, on the balance, the 'easy' way.
This method of adjusting the end shake by raising burrs with a graver was definately common practice in times gone by, I've saw it too many times
on wristwatches too.
Watchmakers of old were not always using best practice when servicing and repairing watches, that's for sure but they had kept
that old watch going for over a hundred years I'd think.
 

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The 'pigs ear' gouges under the balance cock left as some repairman had adjusted the endshake, on the balance, the 'easy' way.
This method of adjusting the end shake by raising burrs with a graver was definately common practice in times gone by, I've saw it too many times
on wristwatches too.
Watchmakers of old were not always using best practice when servicing and repairing watches, that's for sure but they had kept
that old watch going for over a hundred years I'd think.
You often see that repair technique on old clocks... oh well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Nice work on this old watch Aditya and great to see it brought back to life.
I think that this watch has seen little use and is in very nice condition.

Did you count the number of service marks on the case?

I just cleared my 1838 Arnold and Dent fusee from my bench and that old watch has been well used,
very well used, the case has numerous service marks fifteen or more.

It interested me to delve into areas usualy unseen, when working on that old watch.
The numerous repairs, made by long since gone watchmakers, one of whom had rebushed a hole slightly
off center and had punched it over leaving three tiny pock marks on the plate as a tell tale.

The 'pigs ear' gouges under the balance cock left as some repairman had adjusted the endshake, on the balance, the 'easy' way.
This method of adjusting the end shake by raising burrs with a graver was definately common practice in times gone by, I've saw it too many times
on wristwatches too.
Watchmakers of old were not always using best practice when servicing and repairing watches, that's for sure but they had kept
that old watch going for over a hundred years I'd think.
You are right in assuming that this movement is relatively unmolested. I suppose the jewels broke early in it's life and then it was put in a drawer. The crystal broke either during the 'event' or in the drawer. There are none of the usual signs of 'repair' you describe. I understand your neutral attitude to these practices. After all, these watches were not always the precious antiques that they are to us today. Add to that the pressures of a quick and affordable job.

The only questionable repair I noticed is that the hole in the barrel bridge has been punched. This is something I have never understood. I see this in a lot of fusee movements. And yet, how does this hole wear out? The barrel arbour never moves (except for set up), so what causes the wear?

I am not home tonight, so I will document the service marks tomorrow.

Kind regards

Aditya
 

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The only questionable repair I noticed is that the hole in the barrel bridge has been punched. This is something I have never understood. I see this in a lot of fusee movements. And yet, how does this hole wear out? The barrel arbour never moves (except for set up), so what causes the wear?

I am not home tonight, so I will document the service marks tomorrow.

Kind regards

Aditya
I have exactly that problem with the Arnold and Dent, the barrel had also been 'pulled' out of upright and
is running at an angle, they have also been punched and the dial plate hole bushed at some time.

I can only think that the pressure on the hole from the pull of the chain causes this somehow, perhaps a
'rocking motion' of varying pressures is set up when winding the watch and over the years this causes the wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I have exactly that problem with the Arnold and Dent, the barrel had also been 'pulled' out of upright and
is running at an angle, they have also been punched and the dial plate hole bushed at some time.

I can only think that the pressure on the hole from the pull of the chain causes this somehow, perhaps a
'rocking motion' of varying pressures is set up when winding the watch and over the years this causes the wear.
Apologies for the late response. I have been mostly offline for the past few days due to a dodgy internet connection. Is your Arnold and Dent a full plate, 3/4 plate? Could you share pictures? Thanks. I suppose this Dent would be the 'palace of Westminster' Dent. I have got a going barrel 'Kendal and Dent' which, I believe, is an unrelated Dent.

Here are the three service marks on this watch. Cant make head nor tail of them :)





 
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