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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi !

I run a blog (in french) about tactical / survival stuff. I was recently asked by a reader about suggestions for a watch/clock that would be the smallest / most compact possible, in order to be included in a survival kit. Many small watches are women watches, so the only suggestions that came to my mind until now was the Casio F91W and the Timex Camper 32mm, without their straps. Cheap, fairly small and rugged enough.

Have you other suggestion for more compact time devices, be it watches or clocks ? Analog or digital, whatever. Just has to be reliable and somewhat water resistant, preferably from a reputable brand.
 

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Any reason you wouldn't use a watch traditionally described as a lady's watch? If the primary consideration is size with a secondary in ruggedness/WR, then I'd go for something tiny and effective.

In a survival situation, I'd rather have the extra fishing line or iodine tables than worry about what my rescuer thought of my wristwatch.

Easton Avenue - Timex US

Try this on a velcro strap. 14mm might take some time to find, but should exist. The velcro could do double-duty for other survival needs as well.

Only other thing would be to try to find a 10 year battery ladies' watch. The worst thing would be to pull out the kit and find the watch dead, and taking up space something more valuable could have occupied.
 

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If you choose a reasonably sized analog watch like a Timex Expedition then it can also be used as a compass. Be sure to have your survivors-in-training swap out the batteries in any electronic device.
 

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What sort of survival kit is this? Something you carry with you under the seat of your car, or more like a doomsday, end-of-times thing you grab in the event of a major disaster? TBH, if you get lost camping or whatever, I would think a watch would not be among the more useful tools you could carry - the practical survival basics like matches, compass, knife, a way to filter drinking water, etc, would seem far more important. I've never seen any practical wilderness survival guide that emphasizes the need for a functional timepiece to survive. (To the contrary, if you happen to have an analog watch, its most useful function in wilderness survival would be as a crude compass, not for timekeeping.)

If we're talking about a kit you carry around in your car or your backpack, probably a Casio F91W as you mentioned, or some other small digital Casio with a 10-year battery. If the latter scenario (disaster/apocalypse), I would go with something that is not battery-powered, whose battery could die before you ever need to use the kit, or would be wiped out in an EMP scenario, like the cheapest $50 Seiko 5 model you can find. You might have to guesstimate the time when you first set it, but presumably precise, to-the-minute timekeeping would not be a priority in the post-apocalyptic world ;-)

I write this a bit tongue-in-cheek, but only a bit, because I know there are some serious "preppers" out there who take this kind of thing very seriously (in fact there is a cult movement subculture surrounding this notion here where I live).
 

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Hi !

I run a blog (in french) about tactical / survival stuff. I was recently asked by a reader about suggestions for a watch/clock that would be the smallest / most compact possible, in order to be included in a survival kit. Many small watches are women watches, so the only suggestions that came to my mind until now was the Casio F91W and the Timex Camper 32mm, without their straps. Cheap, fairly small and rugged enough.

Have you other suggestion for more compact time devices, be it watches or clocks ? Analog or digital, whatever. Just has to be reliable and somewhat water resistant, preferably from a reputable brand.
If by survival kit you mean a them-thar-hills return to the Stone Age, then a CWC with coin-operated caseback and stack of spare batteries. Althoug to be fair, a lot more people are worried about which luxury brand to purchase this week, so there'll be no armageddon any time soon. If you're building a survival kit for an upcoming trip, just make sure your energency watch has a fresh battery and away you go.
 

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Camel Trophy Adventure (33 mm):

Camel.jpg

No longer sold new, but you can still find them second hand. Worked pretty wel for me the last 17+ years and still going strong.
 

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I mean there are tiny tiny "watches" like those rubber bands with a clock in it, but might have some trade off regarding battery life. I assume you'd want quartz as it would need to run for at least a few years without battery change, but did you have a particular time frame in mind? How often do these kits need to be replaced? as a watch would do you no good if its dead by the time you actually open the thing up. I also assume in a survival kit, it would be in like a box/bucket, and not available to have like a solar power source, which might be the best to have something that would be continuously running.
 

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Timing lightning/thunder to see how far the storm is, timing how long it's been since the last group of zombies attacked, the list goes on...

Probably best to just be prepared for whatever might come your way :)
Ah, never thought about the zombies, makes sense now!
 

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Umm, aren't you wearing a watch? Why have one in a kit? Just wear the right watch. And if you just have to have a watch in a kit that is stowed away, get a hand winder or a cheap auto, like an old HMT or a Seiko SNK809, and toss it in. When the radioactive zombies come, you just have to wind it...or put it on and run for your life.
 
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I'd just pack the watch I liked and buy a bigger tin.

Seriously though the Casio F91W is a good suggestion, though if you are going to be packing a watch away for potentially some time perhaps a mechanical is better than a quartz?
 

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Well, not as small as some at 37.2mm, but this is one of my 2 emergency grab-and-go watches - the LL Bean Self-Illuminating Field Watch. The other is a 40mm Traser, which has a taller, squarer case, and I haven't worn it much since I got the LL Bean.

Here's why I picked this for emergency use in earthquake country:
- Quartz, so it's always ready
- Tritium, so it can always be read, day or night
- Simple dial, high contrast, clear and readable in any conditions
- 300' water resistance rating with a screw down crown to brave weather and chores
- Relatively low profile, tapered case with crown protection to help avoid snags and such.

I've switched it to a Nato strap for weather resistance and quick drying, as well as extra security in case a pin should come loose.

Probably a long-life digital would be better in many respects, since you might want timers, alarms, what have you, but I like the idea of facing a crisis with style!
 

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I get it OP, that 15mm you save from say a 40mm readable watch to going down to a 25mm size will enable you to add a tylenol to your survival kit. Not sure what disaster situation you need a watch for other than to avoid missing last call, or late checkout, but hey don't want to rain on your end of days bunker.
 

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Chuasam, what is that thing? Does it actually work??
 
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