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Discussion Starter #1
Finally managed to snag a 1937(ish) Landeron 47, 3 button chronograph to my collection - it has survived its 77(ish) years fairly well. The copper telemeter ring on the dial is very nice and bright in person, but photography isn't one of my skills.



The crown pusher resets.



Unfortunately the distinctive 47 coupling clutch is missing, but the movement is otherwise running and in good condition. The Landeron tech sheet indicates the 48 coupling clutch will fit, sadly it does look different - but I suspect I'll be waiting a long time for one from a 47 to come along, so one from a 48 will do in the mean-time.



Yet another watch for my service queue.

bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Landeron 47
 

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Great piece, congratulations! The dial really is in excellent condition, given its age. They don't come to us like that very often ;-) (By the way, first I thought 'hey, another instance of the copper-ring Landeron watch', but now on closer inspection I realise that it has actually a scale on the copper ring. This is unusual - the ones I met with so far look more like this:



Here you can see what dials of the age often look like. I could have it replaced but I didn't want to take away the watch's soul - after all, you wouldn't really need the tachymetre-scale too much these days ;-))

As per the movement, as far as I know the parts missing from your watch are interchangeable with the respective items in the Landeron 48 indeed. Have a look yourself:


Landeron 47


Landeron 48

Hope this helps you a bit!

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Looking good - that dial is truly excellent. Good to see you back and posting again.
Thanks! Seems I go into hibernation over winter - come spring and I get interesting in working on them again. I guess it's just too dark after work.

By the way, first I thought 'hey, another instance of the copper-ring Landeron watch', but now on closer inspection I realise that it has actually a scale on the copper ring. This is unusual...
Yes, that was one of the things that attracted me to it (although being a 47 I would likely have bought it no matter what). The coupling clutch from a 48 will fit, but it is distinctively different in looks. I will live with that - its the only thing missing besides 2 screws.

Is that 47 yours?


I am happy to finally have the granddaddy of the ubiquitous x48 family and first of all cam switched chronographs.
 

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Thanks! Seems I go into hibernation over winter - come spring and I get interesting in working on them again. I guess it's just too dark after work.
Vice versa for me...Fieldwork usually keeps me rolling all summer. The work slow-down in the winter means bench time for me.
 

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(...) Is that 47 yours? (...)
Yes, it is. I pulled it off the bay with a broken stem and missing crown (making it really cheap ;-)) and was able to source one from France at the same time. I sent both to my watchmaker. She reworked a pocket watch crown of a distinctive 'bowl' shape, but I'm fine with it as it winds comfortably and allows the reset functionality of the crown pusher to work as intended.

Sometimes you have to compromise.

And I agree with you: the L/47 is absolutely collectible. Here is where the story of many descendant chronograph movements starts, not the least of which are the Lemania 861 (of 'Moonwatch' fame) and the now-ubiquitous Valjoux/ETA 7750. And it was produced for only about 8 months before it was replaced by the hugely successful L/48. Less than 20,000 were made. (Exact figures are hard to come by because apparently very late L/47s received the L/48's dual-button chronograph mechanism, which technically made them early 48s. Still, some count them to the 47s.)

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Cool - I never realised that, honestly, because it looks all the same in my Chronographe Suisse (which then, apparently, holds a very early L/48):



It confirms what we presume about how Landeron ran their production: they used up what was there. I can only assume that the protrusion served a purpose on the (three-pushered) 47, but was no longer necessary in the 48. But then, maybe it has nothing to do with the three pushers but gave additional control about the slack of the clutch (i.e. the 'leeway' between clutch and case). Rough, but works ;-)

Best,
Tomcat
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Yes, some older parts apparently sat at the bottom of the buckets for a long time. Frau Ranfft once mentioned (I think) parts from the 30s appearing near the end of production - I think he said it was the cannon pinion IRCC.

There is an even earlier coupling clutch, but only a few 47s I have found images of have had it, most seem to be this style.

Yours has the later cock, but earlier minute jumper and coupling clutch, so it does look to be on the earlier end of 48s.

The protrusion serves no specific purpose that I can divine in the 3 button. I too thought about the case, and limits, but I just can't bring myself to believe anything useful could be achieved this way.
 
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