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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

Does the screw in case back in anyway better than snap in case? Does this factor influence your decision in watch purchase:-s?
 

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If you open your watch back with any regularity, either for regulation of the movement or for battery changes, I've noticed a snap back can get loose over time or the little recessed portion of the back where you insert your tool to pry open the back can develop a lot of tool marks. Depending on the watch, you might even need a watch press in order to get the back on again without cracking the crystal. A good press doesn't come cheap. With a screw in case back a wrench or a friction ball reduces the risk of leaving excessive tool marks and both are much cheaper tools that a watch press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yankeexpress, Longines Master Collections uses "Pressure Fitted" type case back which is a another words Snap-in case back and also Tissot Visodate to name a few manufacturer.

inkonx, I also believe the case can get also scratch or dent,if you pry open the case often. How do watchmaker open the snap in caseback perfectly?
 

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I tend to avoid snap-in casebacks these days. Had a few too many that once removed were a nightmare to get back on.
Prefer to stick to screw-on or screw-down backs now.

CHris
 

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I would avoid them on anything but vintage BUT I have not seen one on a watch I was considering for many years. Bottom line screw down is just a better mouse trap
 

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I avoid snap-on case backs like the plague. They are seriously awful to take off and put back on. Any type of screw-down case back is superior.
 

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in modern watches a snap back basically means it's cheap and not water resistance to more than 50m (100m on high end snaps) but I still wouldn't trust it.

Personally I am wondering which is best screw backs or screw bolts? I have a hamilton that doesnt screw but just has bolts but only 100m >?
 

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Screw back are more water resistant.

Don't know of any snap-in backs.

Know of screwed down with bolts as opposed to rotating the back screw down.
Those casebacks held down by screws can be a nightmare to remove. The screws heads get damaged from using the wrong driver, or over tightened and impossible to remove.
 

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Screw in is the way to go. Aside from cost (generally), there is no reason why a snap in case back has any advantage.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Steel Tudor Prince Date, black indices dial, 74000-0013
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I won't buy a snap on back, unless it's a vintage watch.

Sorry to reserect an old thread. I have been considering the CWC W10 Navigator re-edition. I adore everything about this watch from the domed plexi to the ETA 2824-2 and have been considering it as an heirloom proposition. However, it has a pressback case.

While I like re-issues I dont so much like purchasing vintage watches due to their fragility and servicability problems. (There are exceptions however). The point is this watch is about the same price as a vintage example, so I would prefer the re-edition in this case.

My question is, do you think the pressback case would give me problems down the line, say if I were to pass this piece onto my son? Thanks in advance.
 

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The advantage of a reissue is the O-ring should be readily available. When work is needed a skilled watchsmith should have the proper tools and skills, to not scratch the back with the caseback knife and evenly press the back on again. But there is always a chance the blade will slip and scratch the back. I've worked on several and some have the smallest slot to get the tip in.

Sent from Capt Kirk's Communicator
 

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The advantage of a reissue is the O-ring should be readily available. When work is needed a skilled watchsmith should have the proper tools and skills, to not scratch the back with the caseback knife and evenly press the back on again. But there is always a chance the blade will slip and scratch the back. I've worked on several and some have the smallest slot to get the tip in.

Sent from Capt Kirk's Communicator

Thanks for the interesting information. That seems to make sense, and from my (limited) experience as well. I heard about that groove sometimes being a problem. It sometimes gets damaged when opening the case. In the past I have pried it up but then moved the knife along and around the ring, so as not to fatigue/ wear the metal groove I have also tried using a hard platic tool so as not to damage the metal. It can take some time, but sometimes works!

However, have you any idea if the metal ring itself is likely to become warped and or worn with age, following the scheduled 5 year servicing periods? I am guessing in say 150 years (2 generations) the caseback should of had to come off and be put back on 80 times. Added to this I am wondering and accounting for the heat expansion of the metal case during that time. I have also considered a new press on caseback may not be that diffficult a thing to have machined (slightly larger) if the future should the original to wear out in 50 years.

I had a Rolex Speedking Precision #4220 from 45'. Unfortunately the case-back thread had become corroded with age. It looked eaten away. Now I come to think of it, it could have been from sea water, but I'm not sure. Or it could have just been humidity in the air or poor storage choices, who knows. But on a Rolex? Doubtful, but then againit was WWII. But, from my experience and in principle, things tend to corrode where there are crevices. I am just brainstorming here, but given the case on the W10 is a tight fitting press back, maybe corrosion would be reduced in this area. However, then we have the problem of wear when taking it on and off. The good thing about screwbacks is the threads can be coated in thin grease to help protect from corrosion and wear, especially if storing the watch. The watch should be stored in a dry place of course with moisture absorbant satchels as well. However, a press back as mentioned could be re-machined, a threaded case can't I don't think, unless it was laser welded and a thread re-tapped on botht the inner and caseback piecs of th case, but this is beyond my knowledge and who would and could do this, apart from Rolex. Then you have cost considerations,

I have not seen many write ups or reviews about this watch and I am somewhat perplexed as to why. At a guess I think it may be the watch is so much of a true re-issue, that people shy away from its modest specs, such as poor water resistance. While I originally agreed with these thoughts, I feel this actually adds to the true original vintage chracter of the piece and is somthing to be endeared. IMO, I feel it is a very worthy re-addition both austhetically, spec wise and how it was made. I believe the dial is hand painted, the hands are traditionally made and re-lumable the the ETA 2824-2 is a common work horse, and parts should be readily available for decades. I like that it has a date, making it a good everyday wear watch. The 1973 tonneau shaped case offers somthing unique and not seen so much these days. I also think the propotions and history make it a very elegant choice indeed.

I don't wish to burden people here with my obsessive compulsive problems, but in conclusion and given these further considerations, would you assess this watch as an heirloom worthy piece then? I am considering 'pulling the trigger' on it!
 

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That's why the back needs to be pressed in flat and even pressure. Also, if done wrong/to quickly the crystal can crack. I know I've been through the learning curve. I bought a bag of watches from goodwill to practice with.

Sent from Capt. Kirk's Communicator
 

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I've worked on several and some have the smallest slot to get the tip in.
Yeah, I don't have a witty comment but I couldn't let this one go by :)
 

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That's why the back needs to be pressed in flat and even pressure. Also, if done wrong/to quickly the crystal can crack. I know I've been through the learning curve. I bought a bag of watches from goodwill to practice with.

Sent from Capt. Kirk's Communicator

Thanks for the reply, that seems like common sense, and is also my experience. However, you have still not answered my question, despite my lengthly response... it was, 'do you consider this an heirloom worthy piece??'. if you dont wish to discuss in more detail, a simple yes or no will courteously do. Thank you.
 
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