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for 3 hrs last night i had a reading of '0' ft, which was spot on accurate. i go to bed, 6hrs later the reading is 40 ft. i reset the altitude to '0' again, when i get to work, which is approx 80 ft above sea level, the reading is fluctuating between 120 feet and 60 feet. the barometric has moved only slightly. am i expecting too much fr this watches altitude function? would a suunto do better, or would the upgrade be only a slight improvement? thanks for your help. i'm driving myself crazy w this!!!!
 

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All ABC`s are driven by air pressure, Protrek`s/Pathfinder`s do not have any altimeter lock technology so will drift according to the air pressure even when you are static. If Altimeter accuracy is paramount look to a Suunto Core they are as good as it gets in the accuracy stakes and it will be significantly better, however dont expect 100% all the time no ABC can deliver this. Protrek`s are best calibrated just before use, there is no other option...

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for 3 hrs last night i had a reading of '0' ft, which was spot on accurate. i go to bed, 6hrs later the reading is 40 ft. i reset the altitude to '0' again, when i get to work, which is approx 80 ft above sea level, the reading is fluctuating between 120 feet and 60 feet. the barometric has moved only slightly. am i expecting too much fr this watches altitude function?
To be honest, yes you do. Of all the ABC brands hitting the market today and those I have tested myself, the Casio Altimeters offer the poorest performance. Casios unwillingness or unability (or both) to put at least a simple altimeter lock on their AB(C) watches has put the brand on the last place in the race und put it completely off for me. If you want never to think again about altitude drifts because of airpressure drift, get a Tech4o from the Traileader series:

Tech4o Running Watches - Pedometer Watches by Tech4o

Unlike most other brands, the Tech4o not only incorporates an automatic alti-lock (which all advanced ABC brands have) but also a manual one. That means you cold climb up Kilimanjaro and your altimeter would still show your home altitude if you forgot to disable the altimeter lock. Also the "normal" digital functions like alarm setting, stopwatch, countdown timer, backlight options and such put nearly any Casio to shame. In my opinion you can't get any closer to the almost perfect sportswatch.

would a suunto do better, or would the upgrade be only a slight improvement? thanks for your help. i'm driving myself crazy w this!!!!
You can bet, that a Suunto does a hell lot better. There are a few things that I personal dislike about the Suunto (Core) and therefore leaning strong toward Tech4o, but no matter what you buy, it will blow your PRG240 to dust.

cheers
 

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I've got both a Suunto X10M and a Protrek PRG90T. The Suunto's readings are far more accurate. I still like the look of the protrek and I like how they have implemented the compass, but even the Suunto is more accurate in that regard being able to use GPS to get an exact reading. On top of the more accurate sensors having GPS brings a whole new level of functionality. I use the Suunto when biking or hiking in new places and the protrek just as a general sports watch. It's a shame, but hopefully Casio will bring out a new generation that are up to the industry standard.
 

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for 3 hrs last night i had a reading of '0' ft, which was spot on accurate. i go to bed, 6hrs later the reading is 40 ft. i reset the altitude to '0' again, when i get to work, which is approx 80 ft above sea level, the reading is fluctuating between 120 feet and 60 feet. the barometric has moved only slightly. am i expecting too much fr this watches altitude function? would a suunto do better, or would the upgrade be only a slight improvement? thanks for your help. i'm driving myself crazy w this!!!!
I just found the best way to do what you want and get rid off head ache.
Take the protrek , atache it to a string and let it down to the groun from the altitude you are. then measure the strings lenght , and here you are the perfect altimeter watcho|.
 

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I just found the best way to do what you want and get rid off head ache.
Take the protrek , atache it to a string and let it down to the groun from the altitude you are. then measure the strings lenght , and here you are the perfect altimeter watcho|.
nice one dan! hehehe
 

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I just found the best way to do what you want and get rid off head ache.
Take the protrek , atache it to a string and let it down to the groun from the altitude you are. then measure the strings lenght , and here you are the perfect altimeter watcho|.
Good one :-! b-) |>

And the barometer aint much better, it cant even withstand a lunch. Because then I go two floors down, the barometer takes a measure and the graph is off... But hey, I got a G-Shock Riseman, so I could simply throw it up high in the air, then I can see the wind direction :think: :-s
 

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I just found the best way to do what you want and get rid off head ache.
Take the protrek , atache it to a string and let it down to the groun from the altitude you are. then measure the strings lenght , and here you are the perfect altimeter watcho|.
*Rofl* - This is one of the best quotes ever. May I have you permission to use this sentence for a future signature in a slightly changed formulation?

Cheers
 

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*Rofl* - This is one of the best quotes ever. May I have you permission to use this sentence for a future signature in a slightly changed formulation?

Cheers
Thank you Holger.You dont need any permission, just do what your heart tells its fun
 

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I have to say Protrek`s are excellent watches and they are at the very top in many respects, the hardware is second to none, accurate and the most durable, even in the most extreme of conditions, however the implementation is a completely different issue and as Holger (Ca..45) points out Casio are simply loosing the market technically and only selling on the brands cudos.

I have pretty much owned and worn Casio field watches from their inception, and the simple answer is unless the general buying public react negatively Casio will continue to produce watches of this ilk, it is simply a function of profitability versus technical prowess. You can make Protrek`s work however it involves far more user input for the altimeter and the barometer not being capable of displaying MSL is rather a joke, as this is a global standard.

What is so completely frustrating with the marque is that they do work perfectly, however the data displayed is continuously inaccurate due to this asinine implementation, not only is the brand loosing credibility with long standing suporters, you have to think about the causal buyer, who goes to sleep at 50M only to wake up to 100m :think: exactly no return buy, so please wake up and start being innovative once again, being different is simply not good enough if you are wrong. People will continue to buy Protrek`s/Pathfinder`s for many reasons, however if you want profesional recognition, make a change as frankly it`s becoming a joke,Casio`s A&B implementation is one of the poorest in the ABC industry, with ABC`s costing a fraction offering far better accuracy. If you are out there this is a "Wake Up Call" :think:

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being able to use GPS to get an exact reading. On top of the more accurate sensors having GPS brings a whole new level of functionality.
I agree, the perfect device to include GPS functionality is an ABC watch. Maybe it is quite battery angry but at least, you can have a short reading of the exact position where you are. I hope Suunto extends some of the X10 technology to is Core models.
 

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None of this helps the questioner much! I'm having the same problem, I still like the watch and would like to know how to make the best of it. Seems like you have to set the altimeter just before use, correct? Any tips on getting relatively accurate readings?
 

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I agree, the perfect device to include GPS functionality is an ABC watch. Maybe it is quite battery angry but at least, you can have a short reading of the exact position where you are. I hope Suunto extends some of the X10 technology to is Core models.
I am looking forward to seeing such a product to appear.. (I own two X9i's and one X10)
 

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None of this helps the questioner much! I'm having the same problem, I still like the watch and would like to know how to make the best of it. Seems like you have to set the altimeter just before use, correct? Any tips on getting relatively accurate readings?
The problem is, you can't fix something that ain't broken but nevertheless doesn't work well. If you want to stick to the Casio brand, the best advise I can give you is to forget about the altimeter as long as you don't need it. Otherwise it will drive you nuts and you can't do a damn about it. If you need to use the altimeter (e.g. going for a hike or something), recalibrate it just before your tour starts and hope that weather stays relatively stable during your activity.

cheers
 

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I agree with cal..45 and Sedi about how to get the most out of the altimeter; I'd also add, that it's a good idea to know your exact altitude at home (assuming you're at home frequently ;-)). This way you can always calibrate before you're leaving home b-)

Also, the GPS's I've seen (car&phone GPS), are quite bad for altitude precision, 50 meters off dont seems to be unusual. So unless you're having a GPS which is proven good for altitude, I'd avoid GPS's....

If you dont know the altitude at home (mine cant be read from Google Earth), then go to a good reference point, preferable close to home, calibrate, and go home and read the altitude. If you're close to the sea you got a nice references ;-) However, in some areas the tide can be extreme - where I live, tides are next to nothing...
 

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The problem is, you can't fix something that ain't broken but nevertheless doesn't work well. If you want to stick to the Casio brand, the best advise I can give you is to forget about the altimeter as long as you don't need it. Otherwise it will drive you nuts and you can't do a damn about it. If you need to use the altimeter (e.g. going for a hike or something), recalibrate it just before your tour starts and hope that weather stays relatively stable during your activity.
And that applies to *all* barometric altimeters, not just Casios.

A barometric altimeter measures pressure change and nothing else. It has a (mechanical or electronic) model of how pressure changes with altitude in the Earth's atmosphere under a specific set of conditions, so it can convert that pressure reading to an equivalent altitude or tell you what the pressure would be at a different altitude (e.g. sea level). But the actual pressure at any altitude also depends on weather, and normal weather change can cause about a +-500 foot change in apparent altitude from what the model would predict, so altimeters also have an altitude offset to adjust the altitude reading for current weather conditions.

The problem is that no altitmeter really knows whether a change in measured pressure is actually due to a change in altitude, or a change in weather. It is ultimately up to the altimeter's user to decide how to interpret the readings. If you know you are stationary, you can watch the pressure (or indicated altitude) change, and interpret it to predict weather. If you know you are climbing and descending, you can interpret the indicated altitude change as real altitude change (though if the weather is changing too, it will introduce some error).

All that an "altitude lock" feature does is switch the device between barometer mode (where it assumes altitude is constant and sea level pressure is changing) and altimeter mode (where it assumes sea level pressure is constant and altitude is changing). If the device has an altitude lock, it has to guess whether you are actually changing altitude or not, generally by how rapidly altitude is changing - but it can guess wrong. Manual altitude lock is potentially more reliable, but you have to remember to use it. And if you have a mechanical altimeter or a Casio, you can still provide your own "altitude lock":
1. If you've been moving and stop for a rest, note the current altitude display.
2. When you're about to start moving again, reset the indicated altitude to what it was when you stopped.

But none of these altitude lock methods can actually separate out weather changes while you are moving. So any altimeter will accumulate some error over time when it's moving. It's always better to recalibrate to your actual altitude whenever you know what it really is (e.g. you are at an identifiable feature on your topo map). I regard altitude lock as a useful but not essential feature; for best accuracy you *still* have to manually recalibrate frequently.

The Suunto and Highgear altimeters *do* get you improved resolution (1 m vs. 5 m) compared to Casio, and probably improved accuracy too, so if I was thinking of spending $250 for a Pathfinder I'd definitely look at the other manufacturers too. But my $60 SGW-300H is awfully good value in an altimeter.

Dave
 

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@ Dave,

You know theory and practice are two very different things. I recommend you get some practice with several ABC brands first and then rethink about what you have wrote. I can assure you, there is quite a lot to edit ;-)


cheers
 

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for 3 hrs last night i had a reading of '0' ft, which was spot on accurate. i go to bed, 6hrs later the reading is 40 ft. i reset the altitude to '0' again, when i get to work, which is approx 80 ft above sea level, the reading is fluctuating between 120 feet and 60 feet. the barometric has moved only slightly. am i expecting too much fr this watches altitude function? would a suunto do better, or would the upgrade be only a slight improvement? thanks for your help. i'm driving myself crazy w this!!!!
You should get a Suunto Core. I am always amazed the ability of my Core to get highly accurate altitude readings even without calibration. I also have several Pathfinders and I think it is not the hardware but the poorly engineered software implementation that is broken. If the core is too expensive, you can get a used Altis from Highgear or the St Moritz equivalent.
 
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