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Not sure about revolutionise, but it's an interesting development. Possibly it is just a glorified hogs bristle, but there are very few truly new inventions out there to be made, and it may turn out (as often happens) that the hogs bristle verge was an excellent design crippled by available materials!

I suspect that once it gets to production it'll be restricted to very high end pieces because of a combination of patents and the fact that (judging by the limited video description) it's simply not something that others will be able to replicate "on the cheap" because it relies too heavily on specialised technological manufacture. I suspect you'd have more chance of making an Accutron index wheel by hand than making that!
 

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And it is another move away from watchmaking. What if it doesn't catch on? Let's say they make a thousand, when they need repair these will not be repairable.
Or if it is successful and lasts 50 years, what about repairing it in 150 years time?
You can cut shape and profile metal, you can't do this with silicon.
I really dislike silicon in watches.
 

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Im an IC engineer on real life. If this thing makes bigger volumes, the part will become cheap as ordinary ICs.
Setting up the manufacturing fab is multi-bling-$ investment, but this has potential to become next "quartz", if it becomes appreciated.
 

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Hi there,

Setting up the manufacturing fab is multi-bling-$ investment...
This would not make me worry. It is not the anisotropical etching what makes a semiconductor fab expensive. Some plastic jars and a simple photo equipment would do for watchmakers to reproduce parts. And if the technology will actually establish, some specialists may buy a photo plotter, and do such jobs for tiny money. I already used photo-lithography to reproduce complicated repeater parts, because I found it boring to saw and file them from scratch, and the equipment of my tiny electronics lab is by far no multi-million sink.

Regards, Roland Ranfft
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And it is another move away from watchmaking. What if it doesn't catch on? Let's say they make a thousand, when they need repair these will not be repairable.
Or if it is successful and lasts 50 years, what about repairing it in 150 years time?
You can cut shape and profile metal, you can't do this with silicon.
I really dislike silicon in watches.
Yes but every maker will have a different one, and when parts run out you won't be able to get a one off made.
Steel and brass however you can.
dom_, very good points.
If parts supplies shrink sufficiently for conventional movements, we arguably can
resort to fabricating parts (hairspings, staffs, arbors, wheels, etc). The problem is that if repairs require significant fabrication...even if we have the tooling and expertise...the customer-base will likely shrink to the very few who will be willing and able to compensate for the additional time and effort.

I would love to have the capacity to do this: Masters of Time: The World of Swiss Complicated Watches - YouTube , but the market may already be saturated with suppliers.

Regards, BG
 
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