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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm trying to find a source for Casio watch parts. In particular I am after a rubber gasket seal for my Casio BM-500W in which the rubber has deformed and hardened in places.
Anyone have any ideas on where to source such parts in new or near new condition?
Thanks.
Tom.
 

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Since you are getting no answers to your query, I would like to tell you that you can try to use a similar material to Locktite, it is used to make seals for engines. I used one a couple of years ago on my 1974 Omega f300. The local AD told me they could not get the original seal for between the case and case back any more. Very fiddly, but it worked. No water ingress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Funny you should say that. I was thinking that I might be able to use some silicone sealant and put it through a medical syringe with a course needle.

Do you have a link to the type of Locktite sealant you're suggesting?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Both these sealants that the two of you describe can they be applied and as easily removed as silicone sealant. Just to clarify, by silicone sealant I'm refering to the sealant you use in your bathroom etc.

Can you guys recommend a specific grade of sealant for this application?
 

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I'd probably be inclined to use something like Permatex® Anaerobic Gasket Maker.

http://www.permatex.com/products/Au..._makers/Permatex_Anaerobic_Gasket_Maker_b.htm

OEM specified. Noncorrosive gasketing material designed primarily for use on aluminum, iron, and steel flanged mating surfaces. Ideal for on-the-spot and emergency repairs, or when a conventional gasket is unavailable. Fills gaps up to .015" and cures to a solvent-resistant seal that will not tear or decay during service. Parts disassemble easily even after extended service and old gasket material can be removed in minutes with a simple putty knife.

Suggested Applications: Water pumps, thermostat housings, transmission pans, transmission case covers, transaxle casings, o-ring replacement
 

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Bathroom Silicone contain some kind of acid, smells like vinegar when it dries. I do not know what it is, but it would surely do damage to the movement.
For the best way to apply it, ask your dentist for a plastic disposable syringe and a thick short blunt needle, as used for applying etchgel on the teeth. If you are a nice patient, he will help you!!
And if you do not want to ask him, PM me and I will send you some. No problem with customs etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the advice and offer, very kind.
If I go the non specialised sealant route when would be the best time to apply the case back?
I'm thinking there are two methods, either affix the case back when the sealant is cured(dry) or uncured(wet). I can foresee a problem with each.

If I was to apply the case back when the sealant is cured, and resembling the original seal profile, then there may be portions of its perimeter which are either above or below tolerance. This may cause lack of seal or may cause the case back to squash and split the seal.

If I apply the case back when it is uncured then the problem may arise where the seal is not a compression seal but spread out to fit the contours of the seal channel and may well allow water ingress.

Of course it might be fine and in the first instance as long as I'm accurate and precise then they'll be no problem and in the second the simple glueing effect and slight spread either side of the seal channel may create the perfect seal.

Your thoughts please.
 

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I would take the in between route. It worked on the Omega.
1: First check how many turns of the caseback between engaging of the threads to fully tight.
2: Apply the sealant. Caseback or rim.
3: Engage threads, screw in little less than fully tight (like 80%).
4: Let set
5: Fully tighten

Because I was not sure about the glueing action of the stuff, I gently moisted the caseback with oil (dental high speed oil), wiped it almost dry before doing the above.
It was shower proof.
Watch has no battery now, is sleeping.
I plan to revive it soon with a new battery, but you know, too many watches and not enought wrists!
I do not know how
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It seems I may have fixed my watch.
I actually went the Silicone sealant route and it seems to have worked fine.
I suck up some Silicone into a medical syringe and applied it with the needle mount, with the needle removed (3/4mm hole approx).
I manage to evenly distribute it around the perimeter of the seal channel and left it to cure over night. Replaced the back and after going in the shower, previously it steamed up inside, it now shows no evidence of water ingress.
I'm actually going to build my own pressure tester at some point to give it a proper run for its money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Just an update to this.
I scrapped the silicone sealant method as it is very annoying and breaks up easily when trying to remove it. Instead I switched over to automotive liquid gasket and have never looked back.

Cheers,
Tom.
 
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