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So, after reading many, many, many different threads on this, I've got to get hypothetical with my situation :)

I currently own a high-quality quartz chronograph rated to 50m (5ATM) - I'm considering spending an entire day in the pool - i.e. shallow water (a few feet) but submerged most of the time and occasionally swimming, but low-impact.

Assuming the watch is in good condition and functions as advertised, should it be suitable for an entire day of shallow, submerged swimming?

Thanks,

Noah
 

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I imagine it would be suitable for a whole year of swimming, thrashing your arms about, jumping into the water, etc.
 

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If I really liked the watch I would not even go out with it on a humid day!!! I kid..:-!:-!:-!

I would go with a conservative extimate if I really liked the watch, I have had quartz models with little booklets advising only hand washing for 5ATM watches. It was a Casio from memory.

But its your watch. Now if you wanted to borrow one of mine.. well :rodekaart
 

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,,should it be suitable for an entire day of shallow, submerged swimming?
Yep, it should be.

However..

The water resistance of your watch is totally dependant on the integrity of the seal on the caseback. Are you absolutely confident that it was changed when the battery was last replaced?

If you're not, and if it is an expensive watch, or you have an emotional attachment to it, why take the risk? Get yourself a cheapo that you can discard if necessary.
 

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Don't wear a watch to the pool - it leaves a tan line. :-!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the "answers", even the silly ones. I know it's a contentious topic.

For the most part, y'all seem pretty anxious about it...

That said, it's still confusing for folks to say they wouldn't wash hands with a "50 meter resistant" watch or it would need "100 meters of resistance" for a few feet of water.

So many of these types of posts are all about how the meterage or ATM-rating has no baring on "real world" experience, which is why I wanted to know a "real world" answer.

To answer a previous replier's question, I am absolutely sure of its integrity, seals and quality.

I guess I'm mostly confused about the ATM/bar/meter considerations (50 meters doesn't mean 50 "real world" meters, etc) - Assuming that the watch is perfect - Should it withstand a day in the pool, submerged at a few feet for a few hours at a time?

Thanks again,

N.
 

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So, after reading many, many, many different threads on this, I've got to get hypothetical with my situation :)

I currently own a high-quality quartz chronograph rated to 50m (5ATM) - I'm considering spending an entire day in the pool - i.e. shallow water (a few feet) but submerged most of the time and occasionally swimming, but low-impact.

Assuming the watch is in good condition and functions as advertised, should it be suitable for an entire day of shallow, submerged swimming?

Thanks,

Noah
It should be fine, as long as you don't inadvertently bang your wrist into any hard surfaces like pool bottom, pool sides, pool ladder, diving board, etc. The rough surface of most pools will do serious damage to any watch case, bracelet and crystal. IMHO water damage from seal leakage in 3 feet of water is the last thing you have to worry about.

I would caution against wearing a watch in the pool unless you really have to time event while in the pool. If it's for fun, save the fun for after swimming.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It should be fine, as long as you don't inadvertently bang your wrist into any hard surfaces like pool bottom, pool sides, pool ladder, diving board, etc. The rough surface of most pools will do serious damage to any watch case, bracelet and crystal. IMHO water damage from seal leakage in 3 feet of water is the last thing you have to worry about.

I would caution against wearing a watch in the pool unless you really have to time event while in the pool. If it's for fun, save the fun for after swimming.
I'm concerned because I was planning on using it for timing - I'm doing some photography underwater and simple timekeeping would be useful. This particular quartz piece is on a rubber strap and I figured it would be my best bet.

I agree with the "hard surface" argument and that's something I was totally aware of. My concern was entirely for the actual water-resistance, in the controlled and low-impact atmosphere of the pool, especially for an entire day.
 

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I'm concerned because I was planning on using it for timing - I'm doing some photography underwater and simple timekeeping would be useful. This particular quartz piece is on a rubber strap and I figured it would be my best bet.

I agree with the "hard surface" argument and that's something I was totally aware of. My concern was entirely for the actual water-resistance, in the controlled and low-impact atmosphere of the pool, especially for an entire day.
My recommendation would be to leave the analog chronograph at home and use a low priced easy to read Timex Ironman, Casio G Shock, Armitron or similar. Water resistance will be the same and you won't be shocked by the all but inevitable damage.
 

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My recommendation would be to leave the analog chronograph at home and use a low priced easy to read Timex Ironman, Casio G Shock, Armitron or similar. Water resistance will be the same and you won't be shocked by the all but inevitable damage.
Why "inevitable damage" if water resistance is the same?
 

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Thanks for the "answers", even the silly ones. I know it's a contentious topic.

For the most part, y'all seem pretty anxious about it...

That said, it's still confusing for folks to say they wouldn't wash hands with a "50 meter resistant" watch or it would need "100 meters of resistance" for a few feet of water.

So many of these types of posts are all about how the meterage or ATM-rating has no baring on "real world" experience, which is why I wanted to know a "real world" answer.

To answer a previous replier's question, I am absolutely sure of its integrity, seals and quality.

I guess I'm mostly confused about the ATM/bar/meter considerations (50 meters doesn't mean 50 "real world" meters, etc) - Assuming that the watch is perfect - Should it withstand a day in the pool, submerged at a few feet for a few hours at a time?

Thanks again,

N.
Keep in mind, many of the answers you get are from people who are scared to wear their watches out of the house and fear clasp scratches if they touch their wrists against the desk while typing. Bear Grylls wears a 50m rated emergency on his show and you see the crazy stuff he does. I cant guarantee that all 50m watches are created equal, but a lot of people here have swam with them and had pretty good success. Sometimes you hear story of water getting in, but I cant say ive seen any more of those stories for 50m watches than I have for 100m watches.

(btw, after re-reading my reply I realize that its not very helpful :) but it is an observation nonetheless :-!)
 

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50 m WR = Swimming pool safe. Go down to the deepest part and live there untill the battery runs out. The nside of the watch will stay dry.
50meters WR is 50 meters WR, no matter what some posters say.

YOU AND YOUR WATCH WILL BE SAFE!!!!!!
 

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50 m WR = Swimming pool safe. Go down to the deepest part and live there untill the battery runs out. The nside of the watch will stay dry.
50meters WR is 50 meters WR, no matter what some posters say.

YOU AND YOUR WATCH WILL BE SAFE!!!!!!
Oh Janne, put on your flak jacket!!

I've personally always wondered about water ratings etc. I've seen pressure tests done, I've seen a couple of my watches tested and the pressure they withstood... no worries. It makes NO sense to me why the atm notes are there if a 50m watch can only withstand a splash of water. Realistically, these things all assume the watch is properly sealed. But any watch regardless of ATM rating can have this issue.

One thing to the original post, most chronographs DO NOT have pushers that are sealed to withstand use underwater... Otherwise, I would not worry too much.
 

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Oh Janne, put on your flak jacket!!

It is OK, my skin is well scarred and bulletproof by now!

One thing to the original post, most chronographs DO NOT have pushers that are sealed to withstand use underwater...
A very good point the rest of us missed! :-!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
AWESOME ANSWERS! Thanks, y'all!

You know, I read all this hooey about "50 meters/ATM not being true" and I think to myself - "Self, with all the huge emphasis placed on 'Swiss Made', provenance and quality control by ETA, Swatch and the major players, how could they flat-out lie about these numbers?" The answer, my friends, is maybe they're not lying - Maybe these watches are really able to withstand at least a reasonable proximity to what they say they are.

Obviously, I'm prepared to deal with bashing my beater watch against something. It can happen above-sea-level as well :) I'm not planning on using the chronograph pushers, either.

Anything is possible - quality control being off, acts of God, etc. but I think that the overall concept of ATM and rated water resistance has to be true, otherwise it would have been disproved by a class-action lawsuit much sooner than this discussion. We already know that the idea of truly "water proof" went out the window due to discerning collectors and experiences and "truth in advertising", so a little faith in the result, actual ratings, has to be kept...

Thanks again for the reasonable explanations and real-world advice.

Keep in mind, many of the answers you get are from people who are scared to wear their watches out of the house and fear clasp scratches if they touch their wrists against the desk while typing. Bear Grylls wears a 50m rated emergency on his show and you see the crazy stuff he does. I cant guarantee that all 50m watches are created equal, but a lot of people here have swam with them and had pretty good success. Sometimes you hear story of water getting in, but I cant say ive seen any more of those stories for 50m watches than I have for 100m watches.
(btw, after re-reading my reply I realize that its not very helpful :) but it is an observation nonetheless :-!)
50 m WR = Swimming pool safe. Go down to the deepest part and live there untill the battery runs out. 50meters WR is 50 meters WR, no matter what some posters say.

YOU AND YOUR WATCH WILL BE SAFE!!!!!!
One thing to the original post, most chronographs DO NOT have pushers that are sealed to withstand use underwater... Otherwise, I would not worry too much.
 

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I'd pretty much agree with what people wrote here. Save to say that I probably wouldn't trust a 50 M watch down to 50 M under the water. Swimming, splashing about, sustained presence underwater, sure. But I wouldn't trust it to SCUBA dive or snorkel with.
 
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