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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My second family watch was owned by my Grandfather who died in 1971. It was given to him and is engraved on the back by Good Humor (Ice Cream Company) and is dated 1935 to Fred Leonard. The inside back of the case is marked woth the Star Watch Case Company logo and the serial #1336694 and hand marked is what appears to be the date 9.16.35 and markings from what I assume are the various people that worked on the watch. The movement is by the Concord Watch Company and has 15 jewels. It also has the word SWISS, the letter B and the word unadjusted. The case is 14k gold filled. I contacted Good Humor a few years ago and they told ne they didn't keep records from back that far.




 

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You already know a fair bit about this watch. It's from 1935 evidently.
TheConcord watch company is still in business, celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2008.
http://www.concord.ch/
A 15 jewel Swiss watch is quite typical of the 1930s and Star is an American watch case company. So your grandfather's watch movement came from Switzerland and was cased in the USA. In my view this would be a better bet for service and restoration as it's a better quality movement. It needs service though as the regulator is off the scale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had sent it off and had it serviced about 15 yrs ago and wore it to special events. I got divorced back in 1999 and it took a couple of years before I could get it back from my ex. When she finally did return it, it only ran for a few minutes at a time. I wish I knew more about how my Grandfather got the watch. The story I got was that he was one of the top sale people for that year which must have been difficult during the depression. Am I right in assuming that the markings on the inside of the back case are from the people that made the watch? The hand writing appears to be different on each one.
 

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Those markings were typically made by watchmakers who serviced the watch. Usually they were a number that corresponded to an entry in a record book. Sometimes they are a date and that's nice for the collector as it gives him/her a bit of the watches history.
 

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The Star Watch case company was located in Ludington, Michigan. Mostly a tourist resort town with little industry. It was sold and turned into condominiums. It is said that they vacuumed enough gold dust out of the cracks in the floors to pay for the building. I have an aluminum plate used on a pantograph machine to engrave the back of a case. I also seen in a garage sale a set of two master dies set in bees wax in a wood block. I should have bought it but that was a long time ago. I also have a new in the box counter top cover to set the item to be looked at on.
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for pointing out the regulator problem. Just to see, I slid it back over and surprisingly the watch has been running ever since although it has lost 5 minutes in the last 12 hours. At least I now know that there is likely not anything mechanically wrong and that a servicing should return it usability.
 

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Fantastic, informative link Marrick. When Omega started producing LED watches in the early 70s ,the most expensive (by far) led produced by them was the solid gold Time Computer 1. Omega turned to Star to produce the first batch (believed to be 50) of cases. Here is the original spec sheet.


 
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