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Hi everyone,
After many years of looking at Stowa's website, I think it's finally the time to buy one of their watches. My collection isn't a vast one but does consist of rather contemporary-sized watches (e.g. Victorinox Ambassador, Seiko Turtle, Seiko SARX, Citizen Blue Angels, etc), and as a small wristed kind of fellow wishing to try something different I decided that might try a 36 mm Flieger.
Now, I've been looking at that model for a few weeks now, and I kept wondering whether I should get the automatic (with ETA 2824-2 in Top quality) or the hand-winder (ETA 2804-2 Élaboré for 20 EUR more), and today I noticed instead of the ETA 2804, the hand-wound version might be powered by the Sellita SW215-1.
And to be honest, I wanted a hand-winder, but I didn't like the fact that I have to pay extra for a movement of a lower grade, but now it's a Sellita, I just might consider it. However, assuming that Stowa will use Top quality SW215-1 (as per Stowa FAQ page, although I believe there's a type, as SW200 is automatic), how does it compare to ETA 2824-2 in Top quality? I know that ETA vs Sellita has been discussed ad nauseam, but I was wondering how do these movements compare in real life.
Is there anyone who has both movements that can tell me which one they prefer (performance-wise)? Or anyone who owns Stowa equipped with the SW215-1, how is the movement performing?

I do apologize if I am duplicating an already discussed topic, I've tried going through the forum looking for an answer, but I could not find one that clear all my doubts.

Thank you guys, in advance.
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The Selita movements must be a very recent thing, it was always ETA only before. That's why you're not finding anything about it. What a shame, but I guess they had no choice.

My Selita performs better than my ETA (purely from a s/d performance), so I don't really have any negative experience. That could be just down to better adjustment really, nothing to do with the movement per se. It's just a feeling of having a clone that rubs me the wrong way. No really objective reasons for it and it is a little silly.
 

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Sellita is pretty much gonna offer identical performance from what I’ve seen in other watches. Stowa was all ETA but I guess they are switching to Sellita which is a shame. IMO. Like fracture said, clones just rub me the wrong way.

So as long as you like the watch I’d go for it. Movements are more or less the same. Can’t really go wrong with a Stowa.
 
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The name of this thread should be called “Stowa is using Sellita now” because I think most of us didn’t know that. I’ve heard about how difficult sourcing ETA has gotten and we see that Stowa is no exception. Does anyone know if they’re going to switch over all their models?
ETA is for whatever reason not meeting demand and Sellita is stepping in. I have Sinn watches powered by Sellita and they can be just as good when modified. I don’t think it will negatively affect Stowa but it may upset those who are partial to ETA.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies!
The name of this thread should be called “Stowa is using Sellita now” because I think most of us didn’t know that.
Actually while researching the case of Stowa's SW215-1 I stumbled upon such threads:

So I thought that Stowa using Sellita's isn't that new, just different.

My Selita performs better than my ETA (purely from a s/d performance), so I don't really have any negative experience. That could be just down to better adjustment really, nothing to do with the movement per se. It's just a feeling of having a clone that rubs me the wrong way. No really objective reasons for it and it is a little silly.
Sellita is pretty much gonna offer identical performance from what I’ve seen in other watches. Stowa was all ETA but I guess they are switching to Sellita which is a shame. IMO. Like fracture said, clones just rub me the wrong way.

So as long as you like the watch I’d go for it. Movements are more or less the same. Can’t really go wrong with a Stowa.
To be honest, I have never thought of Sellitas that way, that they are clones. Swiss and properly made, but nevertheless, clones. Not to get too philosophical, but if someone asked me to describe watch collecting, I'd have to say it's always being torn.

As I mentioned earlier, I want a hand-winder, especially that all my non-vintage watches are automatic, and those few manual Soviet watches I own, are always bringing me the joy of winding them in the morning. Not to mention the 1 mm less in case thickness. I guess have some more thinking to do.

And one thing that puzzles me is Stowa's FAQ (STOWA GmbH+CO KG | Flieger- & Marineuhren seit 1927), not sure if anyone here will know the answer, but the FAQ states that the Sellita SW200 Basic version has "gold-plated Nickel balance wheel", while Top version has "gold-plated Glucydur balance" (just like ETA), however, the specifications from Sellita website states that all four grades (Basic, Elabore, Top and Chronometer) have the same "Gilt" balance wheel.
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Does anyone know for sure whether Sellita uses the same kind of balance wheel for all the movement grades or are they in fact different?

Once again, thank you for all the replies.
 

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Yes, Sellita movements could be rated clones - but in a positive sense.
They started as an assembling company, built many movements for ETA, till ETA decided in 2003 to build all movements by themselves. Today Sellita are the second biggest movement maker in Switzerland after ETA.
They offer movements made from scratch in their premises. Their movement's quality is outstanding beyond all doubt.

Here you can find an essay about Sellita vs. ETA:
https://theoandharris.com/watch-101-eta-vs-sellita-movements/


Volker
 

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Yes, Sellita movements could be rated clones - but in a positive sense.
They started as an assembling company, built many movements for ETA, till ETA decided in 2003 to build all movements by themselves. Today Sellita are the second biggest movement maker in Switzerland after ETA.
They offer movements made from scratch in their premises. Their movement's quality is outstanding beyond all doubt.

Here you can find an essay about Sellita vs. ETA:
https://theoandharris.com/watch-101-eta-vs-sellita-movements/


Volker
Thank you for an interesting read! I don't think I ever really doubted the quality of Sellita, I just never had one, as opposed to an ETA movement which has been powering my Victorinox since 2006, without any issues. And buying a Stowa is quite big for me, so I want to clear all my doubts.

Fortunately, there is still some time before the end of the year (to enjoy the lowered prices due to lower VAT), so I guess I still have some time to think about it all.

Thank you.
 
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