WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone

I recently purchased a vintage Longines (still in question) but i havent received it yet. Have never seen anything like it before and has a patent number on the dial.


Anybody have any idea on the Master Watch case company? I will try to take a closer pic of the movement once it arrives but in the meanwhile can anyone help me shed some light on this piece?
Thanks!

Sent from my SHV-E160K using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,776 Posts
Weird. The movement does seem to be Longines, possibly a variant of this one:
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Longines 11.88
Once you receive it, simply contact Longines.
Numbers for patents owned by the casemaker are usually inside the caseback, well, sometimes outside. On the dial- in case of Longines- it is strange.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Horological_Dino

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Weird. The movement does seem to be Longines, possibly a variant of this one:
bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements: Longines 11.88
Once you receive it, simply contact Longines.
Numbers for patents owned by the casemaker are usually inside the caseback, well, sometimes outside. On the dial- in case of Longines- it is strange.
Thank you for the info! Hopefully Longines can provide me with great details when i receive it. Will update the thread when i do so



Sent from my SHV-E160K using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,315 Posts
I'll bet that all Longines will be able to tell you is that it was sold to Wittenaur. The movement shown is pretty typical of the kind of "private label" movement that Longines sold to jobbers and retailers as a bare movement that they'd then case and sell on their own, which matches the use of this case design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'll bet that all Longines will be able to tell you is that it was sold to Wittenaur. The movement shown is pretty typical of the kind of "private label" movement that Longines sold to jobbers and retailers as a bare movement that they'd then case and sell on their own, which matches the use of this case design.
Hmmm i see. Any idea where Master watch case company would fit in the whole picture? Would this company have retailed the watch itself or was it merely produced by them for another longines retailer?




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,315 Posts
Hmmm i see. Any idea where Master watch case company would fit in the whole picture? Would this company have retailed the watch itself or was it merely produced by them for another longines retailer?
That's harder to say. Since the patent is from 1934, we can assume the watch is from after that. If the balance cock has an import code, that'll mean it's after 1936. The American watch industry, in general, was transitioning to in-house casing, but the import taxes (especially after 1930) were onerous enough that there was a lot of benefit to importing just the movement and casing in-country. Tarriffs dropped a bit in 1936, and the general expansion of the economy after the war made the tariffs somewhat irrelevant to the market, since they were flat-rate amounts and not ad valorum.

I can't find any references to Master Watch Case Co. The patent on the dial is claimed by "Jacob Schonholtz", "David Megar" and "Maurice A. Popiel". There's an earlier patent for a similar design for pocket watches, 1465874, that was filed with Maurice, but not David, and a later patent in 1940 that includes David. (2226939) David Megar also has a number of design patents relating to watches, extending into the 50's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,964 Posts
I think you will find that the movement is considerably older than the case. Movement looks to be Longines, but might have the name of a jewelry store. Longines did that a lot prior to WWII. I saw this watch on eBay and thought it was just a ladies 0-size pocket watch movement (13 lignes) in a patent case.

During WWII, it was impossible to obtain any U.S. made OEM watch cases from the watch companies, as 100% of their output were devoted to military needs.

There were many smaller companies were were able to temporarily fill this gap by producing low grade base metal case and dial sets. Many were designed for particular movements and some even had brand names on the dials. On this watch, I think the brand name was added later, but can't really be sure of that.

This way, a good movement could continue to give service until the war was over and a proper replacement case could be obtained.

Hope this helps,
gatorcpa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,644 Posts
Hmmm i see. Any idea where Master watch case company would fit in the whole picture? Would this company have retailed the watch itself or was it merely produced by them for another longines retailer?




Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I think i read-[when I too discovered an old watch with this case making stamp- that they were one of many case makers in America that were farmed out to case Swiss movements. I think the Master Wach Csae Co. was based in Philadelphia at first then bought up and resold again-maybe in NY or somewhere. I don't think it is particular;ly rare-but interesting to collectors. {i'm pretty sure the watch was an Elgin but I'll check}
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
UPDATE

So i received the watch today and i opened up the caseback and took a few shots under the loupe.




So the movement was supplied to Shreve and co in San francisco. Upon googling that name it seems like they are still in business. I traced the movement number and it traced back to 1911 which is a little strange considering that the patent by the Master watch company who seems to have made the case is from 1934. I am going to contact Longines but I am not too sure if they can exactly identify this either.

Sent from my SHV-E160K using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,315 Posts
Like Gator said, it's been recased. Was probably a ladies pendant watch originally, and someone turned it into a wristwatch in the mid 30's. Maybe the original case was gold (and got sold during the depression). Or maybe they just inherited it, and wanted to make it usable for sentimental reasons. Or many other reasons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Like Gator said, it's been recased. Was probably a ladies pendant watch originally, and someone turned it into a wristwatch in the mid 30's. Maybe the original case was gold (and got sold during the depression). Or maybe they just inherited it, and wanted to make it usable for sentimental reasons. Or many other reasons.
Cool. It would be kind of an interesting coversation starter when i am wearing this watch after i get it serviced.

Sent from my SHV-E160K using Tapatalk
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top