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I am a bit confused. I came across a Stuhrling Original online and thought that it looked pretty interesting. When I went to their website, they speak a lot about Swiss this and Swiss that. When I did some more searching, I came across posts discussing how they are made in China. Are these things any good? I am definitely not of the mindset that a watch has to be Swiss to be well crafted. I definitely love more than a few of the Seikos and Citizens and am even beginning to be curious about the Orient brand as well. Are the Stuhrlings junk or simply quality pieces made in China? :think:
 

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Welcome to wus, we're glad to have you here.
Regarding your thread, I think it would be best handled in the affordables forum.

Thread moved to affordables(good luck)
 

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They are made in China, no way a swiss auto can get sold for $100 brand new.

That said, it seems to be pretty good quality and they have some pretty interesting designs. Check out some of the reviews of the reviews on places like amazon too.

I have a rosegold Delphi and it works great.

Stuhrling Delphi
 

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I take the middle road here. Sturhling watches are definitely not junk - I bought a bunch of Delphis when Amazon had a 1 day sale of them to give away as Christmas gifts this year. They all arrived in good working condition and in nice gift boxes so I can't complain. I'm sure they'll work for a number of years (how well they'll keep time is another story as I'm not sure what auto movement is used) if just due to the simplicity of the watch - no complications, no date.

My personal take is if you can find a watch you like for under a $100, go for it as the designs are unique for the price. Above $100 however I'd have trouble recommending these watches over the likes of an Orient Mako or similarly priced Seiko. Sure the latter two watches would be more conventional in design, but the quality and utility would be vastly superior.
 

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Stuhrling Original watches seem to be very nice, if you check shopNBC.com or Stuhrling's official blog Stührling Original's Official Blog and compare you'll notice that their current website is very out-dated I don't know why...

They used to claim they have Swiss heritage and Swiss movements and bla bla bla but I probably the critics for doing so forced them to openly admit today that they use Chinese movements. I've red so many different opinions and comments regarding these Chinese machines, but the majority states that are accurate and good movements, I don't know who manufacture the cases, dials, etc but I assume that are made in China also, I've found some really nice designs on their watches and the price is fair as well so if you have on your mind just go for it.
 

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Stuhrling Original falls into what I like to call the ShopNBC brand family which include but are not limited to Invicta, Android, SWI and Croton. They are not ALL junk, but they are def not worth more than $150 max!! A few things to know about them.
1. They are not always what they seem or are said to be. Invicta is notorious for changing up a models inards while keeping the same model number ie. the 8926
2. Any limited edition model is a farse so don't be lured by that marketing ploy.
3. Quality control can and will be an issue no matter of the parts. Check here.
4. Research, Research, Research and Research!! The resale on most of these watches are NIL in the WUS community, so if you buy one, make sure you love it and it's going to be a keeper, because your 'return on investment' will diminish quickly.
5. Above all else, buy what you like - that is the most important thing.
 

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I take the middle road here. Sturhling watches are definitely not junk - I bought a bunch of Delphis when Amazon had a 1 day sale of them to give away as Christmas gifts this year. They all arrived in good working condition and in nice gift boxes so I can't complain. I'm sure they'll work for a number of years (how well they'll keep time is another story as I'm not sure what auto movement is used) if just due to the simplicity of the watch - no complications, no date.

My personal take is if you can find a watch you like for under a $100, go for it as the designs are unique for the price. Above $100 however I'd have trouble recommending these watches over the likes of an Orient Mako or similarly priced Seiko. Sure the latter two watches would be more conventional in design, but the quality and utility would be vastly superior.
I think this summary takes the grand prize.

I myself own three Sturhling Originals; two of them needed repairs within roughly one month of purchase (they were both automatics - a Sturhling Winchester and a Sea Hawk), though after the (admittedly pricey) service both have been running very smoothly since (though I wonder if the fact that the frequency with which I wear them has decreased dramatically to the point that I am considering selling both has anything to do with this). Also, in spite of the $20 charge for returns within warranty (and the approximately 1-month turnaround), the customer service is actually good and the repairs well-done (I had actually opened both and totally trashed one of them before sending them in for repairs, and they came back nearly as good as when I first took them out of the box). I can't, however, speak with much certainty on either of their movements, though I know I've seen the movement from the Winchester skeleton in other non-Stuhrling watches (specifically a Rotary, and from what I understand that Rotary was sourced from China, so there's good reason to suspect that at least the Winchester's movement is Chinese in origin).

The third Sturhling I own, a Montague skeleton, is handwinding (not automatic) and uses the skeletonized version of the Chinese Standard movement. I know this because I've compared it to the skeletonized movements of watches (particularly some of the pocketwatches) I've gotten on eBay from those "mushroom" brands, all of which use the skeletonized Chinese Standard, and structurally the Montague's movement is identical to this design. However, there is a major difference in quality. Starting with the finishing, the Sturhling Montague's movement is very well-finished (I can't actually say the same for the Winchester's, though the Sea Hawk's movement is also well-finished). What's more, the Montague has not ever failed on me in the roughly one year I've had it, and it even survived my amateur modding (I replaced the crown with one I took from a dead automatic that came out of a watch I got from another of those "mushroom" brands, and I replaced the hands, as the originals were too difficult to read in anything but broad daylight, with the ones that came from one of those cheap "mushroom-brand" pocketwatches, which added to the steampunk vibe from the Montague and also confirmed that they used the same movement design).

So to answer your original question: from my personal experience, Sturhlings are something of a mixed bag. Watches from them that use simple mechanical (but not automatic) movements are likely to not only sell for less than the others (the Montague was by far the least expensive of the three Stuhrlings I own; the two automatics that needed repair both cost around $120 each not counting the cost of sending them back under warranty - all told I realize now that this was probably too much) but because of the simplicity are likely to be more reliable (the Montague I own cost me something like $70 and is so far as reliable as any watch I still wear, which is more than I can say for the two automatics). They definitely use at least some Chinese movements, but they are definitely not junk, but I wouldn't go so far as to say they're all quality pieces either - only some of them are (which, of course, is a lot more than you can say for some other brands, with perhaps the exception of Sea-Gull, that rely heavily on Chinese-sourced movements). It would be a good idea to try to find anything from them with a price in excess of $100 for less, and perhaps avoid quartz models from this brand, if only because for the price you can probably get two quartz watches from a brand with a better reputation for reliability.
 

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When Stuhling first came out, there was a bit of controversy over their "Lexus" movements, they were claimed as exclusive to them but were essentially off the shelf Chinese automatics.

zippofan,

I can't help but having a chuckle over the "Lexus" movement; they did not even be bothered to think up a name but to pinch the made-up one invented by Toyota: Luxury EXport for the US.
 

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Just one person's anecdotal personal experience, but I bought a Stuhrling Original Emperor style watch about 7-8 months ago. And it's been running flawlessly during that time.

I generally like their designs too. They're eye-catching without going over the top and are (IMHO) reasonably priced.

I had good luck with mine. But it's still less than a year old. We'll see what happens down the line.
 

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I don't have a lot of perspective on Sturhling. I've just bought two of them (both hand-wound) via Overstock this month; I'll find out what my wife thinks about her watch (a Montague whose strap has been replaced with a bracelet from the Invicta Eclipse moon-phase I gave to my sister). My watch, the Millennia Ravine, is lovely so far; the movement is very well finished and the design is funky awesome. I'll end up replacing the strap (which is rather cheap-looking) for another one of my old bracelets; but the rest of the watch looks great. It has held up so far. But I'll see what happens in a year.

IMG-20111211-00010.jpg

At this moment, Sturhling makes the best-designed watches among the Invicta-Sturhling-Croton crowd. Honestly, the designs are more interesting than those of Citizen and Seiko, and on par with Bulova (which is offering the best designs with high quality out there). At the same time, I wouldn't pay more than $145 for one and would stick to around $80 for the mechanicals; at the $150+ range, you would be better off buying Bulovas, Citizens, Seikos and Tissots. And I would definitely buy Sturhlings from Overstock and Amazon only; ShopNBC has a shady reputation when it comes to shipping and handling all of its watches and I think that problem is one reason for the mixed rep for some of those brands sold on that network.
 
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