WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,642 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!

I am new to this forum and to the horology world. I've always had a fascination for watches. I've gathered a few pieces here and there (all cheap) and now I want to slowly start building a decent collection. A friend of mine recommended to start with Seiko Orange Monster, which I really like, so it's on it's way.

I guess I just want to ask out there for any guidance, suggestions on sites, books or anything that can help me acquire more knowledge. Also, any other suggestions on start up pieces?

bests
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,158 Posts
Welcome. I think you're on the right track with your Seiko Orange Monster. Search this forum for anything and you can most likely find some type of an answer. Read up on quartz, mechanical, and automatic movements. Go to some watch stores and try on some sport watches as well as dressier watches. You'll start to et an idea of what you like and what looks good on your wrist in terms of size and whatnot. For other "startup" pieces, that really depends on what you want to spend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,204 Posts
Yeah, if you spend (waste) hours a day on here like a lot of us, you'll pick up more info than your head an hold rather quickly. Just keep perusing every forum until you find a few that catch your interest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,118 Posts
View attachment 1341466
I think this would be good
I disagree 100%! That book is far too difficult for a beginner. It goes into minutiae that are of absolutely no interest whatsoever to the average collector, and, unless one wants to make one's own clock, is beyond any use.

I bought it, hated it, sold it…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,771 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,118 Posts
Here are excellent books that are accessible to the collector:

The World of Watches, by Lucien F. Trueb. This one sits by my bedside. It is extremely well documented, with short, but informative chapters on every watch brand known to Man, on the Watch Industry, and an overview of 500 years of watch history and technology, and a "Who's Who" in watch-movement manufacturing.

Chronograph Wristwatches: To Stop Time by Gerd-R Lang, Reinhard Meis and Edward Force (Mar 1997). A classic. Fantastic history of the chronograph, with many technical details and drawings, by a great watchmaker (Lang). I loved this book and read it from cover to cover. Still refer to it once in a while.

Complete Price Guide to Watches 2012 by Richard E. Gilbert, Tom Engle and Cooksey Shugart. Maybe the 2013 version is available? Exhaustive. I agree with Ray here: a must-have!

Automatic Wristwatches From Switzerland By Heinz Hampel. Great book with tons of information & history. Required reading!

The Mastery of Time: A History of Timekeeping, from the Sundial to the Wristwatch: Discoveries, Inventions, and... by Dominique Flechon and Franco Cologni (Jan 10, 2012). Excellent, and richly illustrated.

Wristwatches Armbanduhren Montres- Bracelets (English, German and French Edition) by Gisbert L Bruner and Christian Pfeiffer-Belli (Nov 1999). Very nice, in three languages. Lots of pictures. Mostly a description of a collection of watches, not a narrative.

Also, check out this old thread.




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Seikos are the perfect start. I really didn't know much about watches at all until I bought my Seiko SKX007 years ago....and then my Black Monster.....and then a Seiko 5....and then my first vintage Omega...and my second vintage Omega.....and my third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh vintage Omega.....ok, you get the picture. Trust me, you'll have no problem learning/staying interested in this hobby! The forum really is a wealth of knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,642 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone for your input. it is very informative and appreciated. I'm looking forward to the experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
848 Posts
Welcome! Lots of good advice above. Also visit a lot of manufacturer websites. Many of them share history about their company, philosophy etc., so you can get a sense what various brands stand for.

In addition to learning about familiar brands with great quality like Omega, Tissot, Rolex, Hamilton, also search for "boutique" watches on WUS to learn about some of those brands. There are a lot of micro-companies like Lew & Huey, Halios, Padron, and many more that IMHO represent great value for the dollar. It's fun to learn about the people and motivations behind the brands. So many of those company owners are active on these forums and are very generous with their time answering questions. Without folks here on WUS, I probably never would have known about those brands.

People on WUS helped me learn a lot in my first year. Remember to have fun. The most important rule, to me, is find what watch(es) you personally like. And as you learn more and gain more insights please do share your own experiences and ideas back on this forum!

Cheers
Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,206 Posts
Never mind buying watch books. Just start with the catalogs. You can download them or request free print copies. Also sites like ablogtowatch are good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,777 Posts
I disagree 100%! That book is far too difficult for a beginner. It goes into minutiae that are of absolutely no interest whatsoever to the average collector, and, unless one wants to make one's own clock, is beyond any use.

I bought it, hated it, sold it…
I bought it, love it, and won't sell it, but other than that, I completely agree. No one new to watches will have any use for Dr. Daniels' excellent but arcane books.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
I bought it, love it, and won't sell it, but other than that, I completely agree. No one new to watches will have any use for Dr. Daniels' excellent but arcane books.
I have this one also, and I agree it's over-the-top for a beginner. I started with The Theory of Horology.

I'm now waiting for The Practical Escapement.


Sent from my lucky rocketship underpants
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top