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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

OK...it's time for me to get a digital camera at last and I decided that I want something that can take decent entry-level macro shots of my watches, as well as work as a more general camera. I want to spend between $150 and $300 on something but really know nothing about the area. The cameras I have been considering are:

Olympus Stylus 7010 or 9000
Canon PowerShot SX120 IS
Panasoni Lumix DMC-ZS3

I am open to other suggestions or advice. Please help!
 

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I recently purchasing a new point and shoot a few months ago, and I've been very happy with it. I believe it's also the smallest camera out on the market.

Have you taken a look at the Canon IXUS 100 IS? Might be called something else based on geography, but a quick google search should confirm it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That one looks good. Thanks for the suggestion. I might have to look in duty-free stores, as, although I can get by in Japanese, I really want the user menu to be in English. Many of the cameras here have their menus in Japanese only, which is a pain in the...um...
 

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Hi all!

OK...it's time for me to get a digital camera at last and I decided that I want something that can take decent entry-level macro shots of my watches, as well as work as a more general camera. I want to spend between $150 and $300 on something but really know nothing about the area. The cameras I have been considering are:

Olympus Stylus 7010 or 9000
Canon PowerShot SX120 IS
Panasoni Lumix DMC-ZS3

I am open to other suggestions or advice. Please help!
I have a Panasonic FZ50 (which has been a nice camera) but it's more of a "bridge" to DSLR. I bought it as a beginner camera and now fills the role of "work and family camera". It has a really nice lens and is very versatile.

However, it (like most P&S) has a really small sensor and only really performs to it's best capabilities outdoors and in nice sunlight. It's macro capabilities are so-so.

If I was looking for another P&S, I'd be looking at the Canon G10. It has really good reviews and takes very impressive images!

Good luck in your choice,
Wallace
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that! The G10 looks good, but is a bit out of my price range...and probably too complicated for a neophyte. I want something that I can use with basically no camera experience. I think something like that will probably be in the future for me after I have learned the basics.
 

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Thanks for that! The G10 looks good, but is a bit out of my price range...and probably too complicated for a neophyte. I want something that I can use with basically no camera experience. I think something like that will probably be in the future for me after I have learned the basics.
You're welcome! I think the only other tip I can give you (and can't emphasize enough) is that it's all about light!

Photography means "writing with light".

The small sensors of P&S cameras have millions of photoreceptors jammed onto chips (for marketing purposes) the size of your thumbnail. The closer these sensors are, the more they "bleed" or transfer information between themselves. In low light, the camera amplifies the reception and the "noise" becomes pronounced. The result is poor quality images.

Low light means slower shutter speeds and may require use of a tripod. Otherwise, you're into changing ISO or Aperture settings to compensate which (I think) is beyond your intended means of use or goals as a photographer. If not, you'd do well to investigate and invest in a camera that gives you a chance of manipulating the settings to compensate for inadequate lighting.

Bottom line; if you're disappointed in your images (no matter the camera you choose) remember to choose a lighting situation where the camera is not struggling. In good light, any camera has the ability to capture images you'll be proud of!

Best of luck,
Wallace
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow! Great advice that it easy to follow. Thank you so much!

My plan for photographing watches, for what it is worth, is to set up the shots in a rudimentary light box, put the camera on a tripod, set the self-timer to the minimum time and let it all happen. Perhaps, given the fact that it is on sale, the FX60 sounds like as good a starter as any for me.
 

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That one looks good. Thanks for the suggestion. I might have to look in duty-free stores, as, although I can get by in Japanese, I really want the user menu to be in English. Many of the cameras here have their menus in Japanese only, which is a pain in the...um...
I'm pretty sure this one's menus are in English - at least mine is. Worst case, you should try to buy in HK, or from a HK-based seller.
 

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I have a Panasonic FZ50 (which has been a nice camera) but it's more of a "bridge" to DSLR. I bought it as a beginner camera and now fills the role of "work and family camera". It has a really nice lens and is very versatile.

However, it (like most P&S) has a really small sensor and only really performs to it's best capabilities outdoors and in nice sunlight. It's macro capabilities are so-so.

If I was looking for another P&S, I'd be looking at the Canon G10. It has really good reviews and takes very impressive images!

Good luck in your choice,
Wallace
The G10 is an excellent camera, but more of a "prosumer" or bridge camera.
 

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You're welcome! I think the only other tip I can give you (and can't emphasize enough) is that it's all about light!

Photography means "writing with light".

The small sensors of P&S cameras have millions of photoreceptors jammed onto chips (for marketing purposes) the size of your thumbnail. The closer these sensors are, the more they "bleed" or transfer information between themselves. In low light, the camera amplifies the reception and the "noise" becomes pronounced. The result is poor quality images.

Low light means slower shutter speeds and may require use of a tripod. Otherwise, you're into changing ISO or Aperture settings to compensate which (I think) is beyond your intended means of use or goals as a photographer. If not, you'd do well to investigate and invest in a camera that gives you a chance of manipulating the settings to compensate for inadequate lighting.

Bottom line; if you're disappointed in your images (no matter the camera you choose) remember to choose a lighting situation where the camera is not struggling. In good light, any camera has the ability to capture images you'll be proud of!

Best of luck,
Wallace
Thanks for the tips, Wallace. I'm sort of a struggling beginner myself, and I've recently also learned the importance of lighting! :-d
 

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I think you simply can't go wrong with a Canon when buying a point and shoot camera. Panasonic also have some innovations which aren't bad.

(note: I use a Nikon DSLR and still recommend Canon for P&S).
 

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I bought my sister a canon powershot (2 years ago dont know the model) and takes great pics. I have a nikon d40 and everytime someone ask me what digital camera in my opinion is a good buy, I always tell them to look at canon powershots.
My gf has a nikon P&S and it also takes great pics btw
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the advice, guys...we'll see what happens. For now, I am much better equipped with knowledge than before and grateful for that!
 
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