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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This arrived today. Loved the dial. Has crappy original bracelet but browns look better. Thought it was a quartz but turns out to be a (guessing) Seiko AGS movement. Probably early 90s. Dial similar to Sus AGS. Hope anyone can tell me more. One image
15886600
old auction item but shows tags.
15886598
15886599
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting piece. Never saw one before ! Hope someone will tell you more about it.
Thanks. Surprised me too. I've seen diver versions on ebay but this type is a first. Love Orient vintage. Love AGS. Win. Win. Stay tuned. We may find out more.
 

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This arrived today. Loved the dial. Has crappy original bracelet but browns look better. Thought it was a quartz but turns out to be a (guessing) Seiko AGS movement. Probably early 90s. Dial similar to Sus AGS. Hope anyone can tell me more. One image View attachment 15886600 old auction item but shows tags. View attachment 15886598 View attachment 15886599

Wow. I spent many years living in Japan (Osaka, actually) and amassed a pretty significant collection of JDM Orient watches while there, and I never once saw anything of that "GeneQua" line. And you're right about the dating on it--it's almost certainly from pre-2000s. Nice find!

Just out of curiosity, what part of Osaka are you in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow. I spent many years living in Japan (Osaka, actually) and amassed a pretty significant collection of JDM Orient watches while there, and I never once saw anything of that "GeneQua" line. And you're right about the dating on it--it's almost certainly from pre-2000s. Nice find!

Just out of curiosity, what part of Osaka are you in?
Hey, sorry we didn't meet when you were here. Yes, I've added about 400 watches all locally bought since I began collecting. If you love Japanese watches this is the city to be in.

I'm in Izumisano. Close to the action at the airport. Lol. Can't go anywhere yet. Have a Burger King now at the airport so it's still worth a visit.

Yeah, I was really surprised at this watch. Never seen one. Or heard of it. The fact that Orient chose the AGS to power it instead of quartz or their own auto is interesting. I think there was a push to "the best of both worlds" and the lure of no battery change. The label says ten years so that's about right for the capacitor. Haven't opened it up yet. I suspect it's a standard capacitor. Would love to find some advertising on the watch. I might as Orient guy if he knows of it.

Cheers.

David
 

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Hey, sorry we didn't meet when you were here. Yes, I've added about 400 watches all locally bought since I began collecting. If you love Japanese watches this is the city to be in.

I'm in Izumisano. Close to the action at the airport. Lol. Can't go anywhere yet. Have a Burger King now at the airport so it's still worth a visit.

Yeah, I was really surprised at this watch. Never seen one. Or heard of it. The fact that Orient chose the AGS to power it instead of quartz or their own auto is interesting. I think there was a push to "the best of both worlds" and the lure of no battery change. The label says ten years so that's about right for the capacitor. Haven't opened it up yet. I suspect it's a standard capacitor. Would love to find some advertising on the watch. I might as Orient guy if he knows of it.

Cheers.

David
That seriously takes me back. I'd always lived and worked more in central/northern Osaka (Namba/Kyobashi/Kadoma/Hirakata) but would occasionally venture south to your neighborhood for random dates (Rinku Town) or other such activities in Sennan or Kawachi-Nagano. I'm guessing your job is tied to the airport or tourism?

For me, Yodobashi Umeda was my drug dealer of choice. Even after all these years, I'll pop in to grab some random Orient Star or Seiko Prospex during a visit and it's the same guy from 2005 working the counter and he still remembers me. Whenever this pandemic is over, I'm going to go absolutely apeshit at Yodobashi and even worse at Nakano up in Tokyo. Something to look forward to!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You'll have a blast. I'll meet you for lunch. I'm almost entirely vintage these days but love the big store up north. I hang around Bic Camera in Namba and Yamada Denki in Namba Parks. I ended up in the south when I took a teaching job at a local uni. Still there. Still buying too many watches.
 

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Totally wish I lived in Japan with you guys. Have access to all the best "crack." Especially with Orient, but also with the usual suspects (Citizen, Casio, Seiko). Now, I'm just too old and settled to make the move... and too senior to take the seniority hit to join a Japanese med device company...

Anyhow, I've developed a serious soft spot for Orient - I have 3 now, but have no steady source for vintage (+20 yr old). I did manage to get a 10 year old Worldtimer that I'm totally in love with, though... just have to carefully pour through eBay and be ready to strike when one shows up...
 

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We need to see some photos of your collections, both Orient & 'those other watch makers' (just joking). We all love seeing unusual and unique JDM models by any maker.
 

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You'll have a blast. I'll meet you for lunch. I'm almost entirely vintage these days but love the big store up north. I hang around Bic Camera in Namba and Yamada Denki in Namba Parks. I ended up in the south when I took a teaching job at a local uni. Still there. Still buying too many watches.
Good on you for scoring that gig. These days, I hear legit uni jobs are extremely hard to come by--definitely not like things were back in the late 90s. I got extremely lucky during my time there as I was still a kid in my 20s but made the right friends and was greased into a direct-hire teaching gig with the prefectural government. Wasn't rolling in cash but certainly making more than all my friends stuck in the eikaiwa rat-race and just about all of that money went into 1) women, 2) beer and 3) watches. And in that order.

What I'd give to re-live the early 2000s.
 

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Totally wish I lived in Japan with you guys. Have access to all the best "crack." Especially with Orient, but also with the usual suspects (Citizen, Casio, Seiko). Now, I'm just too old and settled to make the move... and too senior to take the seniority hit to join a Japanese med device company...

Anyhow, I've developed a serious soft spot for Orient - I have 3 now, but have no steady source for vintage (+20 yr old). I did manage to get a 10 year old Worldtimer that I'm totally in love with, though... just have to carefully pour through eBay and be ready to strike when one shows up...
Japan is definitely a younger man's scene if you're looking to actually live there. Especially in the big cities, the lifestyle, pace and social scene is very much geared toward those in their 20s, and by that I mean early to mid 20s. That said, it's been over a decade since I left and I still love going back for vacations and annual mid-life-crisis shopping spree. I may not be raising hell at 2am in downtown Osaka any longer with lots of young girls and even more alcohol but at least now I can afford lots of nice things for myself and these nice things don't put on their clothes and leave in the morning.

To be honest, I've been generally disappointed with what Orient Japan has been offering over the past number of years. Even Orient Star, which has generally been what I gravitate toward if I'm going to purchase JDM (if not Prospex) has been rather bland. Vintage is definitely the way to go and with a brand like Orient you can score all sorts of interesting used watches for very, very little money. I'm really hoping they'll expand/upgrade their line of dive watches with features that put them on par with their Swiss counterparts (like a ceramic bezel, at long last, and a decent screw-link bracelet and solid milled clasp). Orient and Seiko JDM offer fantastic watches in the $500 range, but their offerings in the $1000 range just don't, to me, add up.

If you've still got that Orient itch this time next year--when, hopefully, this f'ing pandemic is over and we can travel again--you should seriously consider a trip to Tokyo and Osaka. Plane fare and hotels will be ridiculously cheap, the dollar is projected to grow against the yen again to the 113-115 range and that means a potentially epic shopping spree for the American tourist.
 

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What are you twos teaching in Japan?


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Most every Westerner who heads off to Japan for work does so under the guise of an English "teacher." That's basically the only use Japan has for the average foreigner, given Japan's decades-long goal of trying to improve English-language education in schools to make Japanese more competitive in global commerce. The opportunities for higher paying teaching gigs peaked during the 80s and 90s, where a lot of educators (like a few of my friends and relatives) with grad-level degrees and teaching credentials were able to land FT gigs at universities and colleges in Japan paying upwards of $80k/year--not bad at all in 1988, particularly for a public school teacher who was making about $25k/year back home.

However, the high demand and allure of easy money (and women) drew far too many Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies to the country and by the late 90s the market was saturated and Japan had far more expats living there and competing for such gigs than it needed. And right around that time a new sort of business appeared, called the "eikaiwa." Basically, a corporate language English-language education company that uses clever marketing to charge exorbitant rates to teach bored housewives how to order from the McDonald's menu in English. These new corporations became hugely successful and began importing thousands of young English-speakers from all over the world, only now they were paying around $30k/year for FT "teachers," most of whom were inexperienced 22yo recent college grads who'd never had a real job before. Although not nearly as huge of an industry as it was 20 years ago, the eikaiwa industry is still the largest employer of expats in Japan.

I got lucky during my years in Japan. I came in through the usual eikaiwa racket, but was able to make connections and friends and a couple of years later was greased into a cushy government gig working directly for a prefectural BOE in a really prestigious high school. Higher pay, less responsibilities, tons of paid vacation and other perks and an air of respectability (I was an actual "teacher") that certainly translated into more action with the more respectable female demographic, rather than the usual Friday Night bimbo assortment at the downtown clubs and bars.

I really, really miss being 25 years old. Sometimes.
 

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Most every Westerner who heads off to Japan for work does so under the guise of an English "teacher." That's basically the only use Japan has for the average foreigner, given Japan's decades-long goal of trying to improve English-language education in schools to make Japanese more competitive in global commerce. The opportunities for higher paying teaching gigs peaked during the 80s and 90s, where a lot of educators (like a few of my friends and relatives) with grad-level degrees and teaching credentials were able to land FT gigs at universities and colleges in Japan paying upwards of $80k/year--not bad at all in 1988, particularly for a public school teacher who was making about $25k/year back home.

However, the high demand and allure of easy money (and women) drew far too many Americans, Canadians, Brits and Aussies to the country and by the late 90s the market was saturated and Japan had far more expats living there and competing for such gigs than it needed. And right around that time a new sort of business appeared, called the "eikaiwa." Basically, a corporate language English-language education company that uses clever marketing to charge exorbitant rates to teach bored housewives how to order from the McDonald's menu in English. These new corporations became hugely successful and began importing thousands of young English-speakers from all over the world, only now they were paying around $30k/year for FT "teachers," most of whom were inexperienced 22yo recent college grads who'd never had a real job before. Although not nearly as huge of an industry as it was 20 years ago, the eikaiwa industry is still the largest employer of expats in Japan.

I got lucky during my years in Japan. I came in through the usual eikaiwa racket, but was able to make connections and friends and a couple of years later was greased into a cushy government gig working directly for a prefectural BOE in a really prestigious high school. Higher pay, less responsibilities, tons of paid vacation and other perks and an air of respectability (I was an actual "teacher") that certainly translated into more action with the more respectable female demographic, rather than the usual Friday Night bimbo assortment at the downtown clubs and bars.

I really, really miss being 25 years old. Sometimes.
That what I thought, teacher. Don’t you have to speak Japanese to be an English teacher?


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That what I thought, teacher. Don’t you have to speak Japanese to be an English teacher?


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Yes and No. To be an eikaiwa pretend "teacher," no. In commercial class settings, teachers are forbidden from using Japanese in the classroom and students are likewise discouraged from doing so. It's a cheap attempt at immersion education for those foolish enough to pay for it.

In an actual educational setting in, say, a high school or college classroom, it's obviously beneficial to be fluent in Japanese and most respectable institutions will require any employee to have a working knowledge and grasp of the Japanese language.

But as a general rule of thumb, any foreigner hoping to live and work in Japan, or any country, should have a working grasp of the native language. When I moved to Japan, every time I got lazy and neglected my language studies, I just remembered how enraged I would get at the Burger King counter whenever I'd get the minimum wage "NO INGLES" cashier, and then I'd get back to bettering my language skills.

It also highly facilitates dropping panties, if that provides further motivation.
 

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Why are you moving back to the states? Since you were making good $$$ why didn’t you married a beautiful Japanese girl and live in Japan?


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Why are you moving back to the states? Since you were making good $$$ why didn’t you married a beautiful Japanese girl and live in Japan?


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Go back and read the thread. I've been home for over a decade. At a certain point I'd just had enough of Japan and wanted to go back to the real world. And while my BOE gig was extremely good for the time and place, it was never particularly lucrative. I'm making three times what I used to in Japan and at my age that's still just enough for the basics (and a nice watch once or twice a year). As I said previously, Japan is a young man's playground. At my age, Japan is absolutely wonderful in small doses--like the two or three trips I was taking every year before this awful pandemic--but I could never go back to living there again. Sort of a "been there done that" thing.

But I am married to a very pretty girl from Japan.
 
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