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Hi

one question about Swissmatic, is it serviceable or only swap the movement? and how often?
 

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Short answer, a Swissmatic watch is serviceable; however, the movement is disposable, see the article from Gear Patrol below:

The case back is also removable, which rectifies a sticking point with the plastic Swatch Sistem51 that debuted a few years ago - this one can be serviced. That said, given that most of the movement is soldered together, a service would likely require replacing the entire movement. According to Tissot, such a service "would not exceed $150," if out of warranty.

https://gearpatrol.com/2017/12/01/tissot-everytime-swissmatic-review/

As for how ofter, probably when the Swissmatic watch is outside of its specs of around +/-10 seconds a day.
 

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thanks for answer. so it is like Seiko 7s26. cheaper to swap movement than do a service?
Cheaper from the perspective of the Swatch Group Service Center when it comes to their own overhead costs and the cost to the customer. Plus, like most of the newer movements of the Swatch Group/ETA for Tissot, Certina, Hamilton and Mido, the movements are regulated at the factory using laser technology buy shaving pieces of metal off the hairspring.

I would think it is easier to just replace the whole movement with a movement directly from the factory than having to replace the hairspring and then regulate the movement's accuracy specs using laser technology.
 

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A Swissmatic movement is NOT serviceable at all: there is a single screw (for the oscillating mass). The rest of this movement is thermo-welded. Thus you cannot dismantle it.

A Powermatic 80 IS serviceable though. That's basically a 2824-2 with a somewhat different kind of escapement and ms barrel.

Swissmatic =/= P80.

Keep in mind in a full service both movements would be swapped :

- your old swissmatic --> new swissmatic
- your old P80 --> another freshly serviced P80
 

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Keep in mind in a full service both movements would be swapped :

- your old P80 --> another freshly serviced P80
Interesting. I didn't realize they just swapped in a different movement. That makes sense to me now though, as I recall being told in a Tissot showroom that if you get the servicing done by Tissot themselves, the watch receives a brand new 2 year manufacture's warranty on the mechanics. This makes complete sense if you aren't getting "your" movement back. They can pretty much guarantee that the movement is back to factory specs, therefore not a big deal if they give you another warranty.
 

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A Swissmatic movement is NOT serviceable at all ...
By "serviceable", one has to be able to differentiate between "being serviced" and being "throw-away". The Swissmatic is "serviceable" in that the case back can be removed, thereby allowing the movement to be removed and replaced. Whereas with the Swatch Sistem51, the movement is not "serviceable" because the case back cannot be removed, thereby not allowing the movement to be replace, thereby rendering the whole Swatch Sistem51 watch being thrown away instead of being serviced.

Apologies beforehand with respect to the semantics.
 

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The common understanding of using the word service (serviced, serviceable) in relation to a mechanical object is that the said object can be dismantled in some way, lubricated, adjusted and reassembled. If your car engine was swapped out for a new one you would not say it had been 'serviced' but replaced. So I would advocate that the Swissmatic movement is not serviceable but replaceable.
 

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but what if Tissot stops manufacturing swissmatic movement?
From Tissot's user manual, it states the following for analog mechanical watches:

Availability of spare parts
From the stoppage date of the watch production, TISSOT® guarantees the availability of its spare parts for a minimum period of 10 years for standard watches, and for a period of up to 20 years for gold watches. If for any reason production of a particular spare part is stopped or deferred, TISSOT® reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to offer the customer an alternative solution.


https://www.tissotwatches.com/assets/usermanuals/157-en.pdf

The way I look at it, by the time this 10 year period has passed, you will probably have moved on to another newer and better watch.
 

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From the stoppage date of the watch production, TISSOT® guarantees the availability of its spare parts for a minimum period of 10 years for standard watches, and for a period of up to 20 years for gold watches. If for any reason production of a particular spare part is stopped or deferred, TISSOT® reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to offer the customer an alternative solution.
FWIW, my experience with discontinued watch parts (for repairing a watch), has been very good. I had this scenario (albeit not with a Tissot) just a few months ago and I was offered any currently model watch, brand new, at a 60% discount off MSRP. Can't really complain about that.
 

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FWIW, my experience with discontinued watch parts (for repairing a watch), has been very good. I had this scenario (albeit not with a Tissot) just a few months ago and I was offered any currently model watch, brand new, at a 60% discount off MSRP. Can't really complain about that.
From reading the Hamilton forum, there have been several posts of a similar nature, where Hamilton would offer a deep discount towards a new watch as well.
 

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FWIW, my experience with discontinued watch parts (for repairing a watch), has been very good. I had this scenario (albeit not with a Tissot) just a few months ago and I was offered any currently model watch, brand new, at a 60% discount off MSRP. Can't really complain about that.
That doesn't sound like a good experience at all. That sounds like they were incapable of doing the repair you asked for so they offered you an incentive to do what works better for them. 60% off MSRP could've just been market price depending on what watch it was and when.

I guess that's good if you intend to rotate through watches like you would with computers or phones. Not so much if you're wanting something that lasts.

Think of all the great vintage watches out there that are still valuable because they are still serviceable. We're rapidly moving toward a world where stuff like that doesn't exist anymore. That's not a good thing.
 

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That doesn't sound like a good experience at all. That sounds like they were incapable of doing the repair you asked for so they offered you an incentive to do what works better for them. 60% off MSRP could've just been market price depending on what watch it was and when.

I guess that's good if you intend to rotate through watches like you would with computers or phones. Not so much if you're wanting something that lasts.

Think of all the great vintage watches out there that are still valuable because they are still serviceable. We're rapidly moving toward a world where stuff like that doesn't exist anymore. That's not a good thing.
I hear what you're saying about vintage and serviceable and all that. I don't disagree.

That said, you're right, the world is moving towards disposability. The offer I was made based on the situation at hand (a 10+ year old watch, not a special reference, not even an automatic actually) was very, very acceptable to me. I got a nice new timepiece that I've very happy with, at a price that I felt was very reasonable (basically it was marginally more than what I would have expected to pay for the repairs). Personally, I can easily live with that and be happy.
 
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