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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always wanted a watch with a sterling silver case and ochs und junior offer them soooooo . . . . I knew the silver would discolor over time but that to me was very fitting for this watch, I wanted to wear it whenever and wherever and embrace the oxidation, very fitting (to me) given it's casual, rough design. Pics of a couple when it came in and today . . . . I dare not show the backside, it'd probably cause a nauseous reaction in/for some . . .

I cleaned it up once, came back nice an shiny, not sure when or if I'll do that again, we'll see . . . . anyone else with a sterling silver watch, would love to get your experiences . . .
 

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I work with silver and for me the patina appeal is on variable height surfaces (eg engraving) where the high spots will stay silver from rubbing, contact, light polish, but the patina develops a contrast in the low spots over time. You see this effect on vintage pieces. On big smooth pieces it just ends up looking dirty.

The other problem with sterling is that it scratches if you breathe in its general direction. I shot tumble my pieces regularly, which burnishes over the micro scratches, and work hardens the surface a bit, to restore shine. Can't do that with a watch, though...
 

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That looks great. Similar though less pronounced than bronze I guess, in that the patina suits casual watches, unless you want to fuss with regular polishing.
Which is why I got the bronzo Archimede. It's all about patina just like my shoes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I work with silver and for me the patina appeal is on variable height surfaces (eg engraving) where the high spots will stay silver from rubbing, contact, light polish, but the patina develops a contrast in the low spots over time. You see this effect on vintage pieces. On big smooth pieces it just ends up looking dirty.

The other problem with sterling is that it scratches if you breathe in its general direction. I shot tumble my pieces regularly, which burnishes over the micro scratches, and work hardens the surface a bit, to restore shine. Can't do that with a watch, though...
I've no where this kind of experience Dimman, but the surface contrasts you mention is interesting, must be neat to see. My watch does indeed end up looking dirty but for some reason I like it, just makes it seem so much more of a casual, bang around watch which is one of the reasons why I purchased it, thanks for the mini education/info . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That looks great. Similar though less pronounced than bronze I guess, in that the patina suits casual watches, unless you want to fuss with regular polishing.
Thank you GlennO! Yes, ochs' other metal choice is titanium but I much prefer the heavier feel/heft of the silver on my wrist . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Which is why I got the bronzo Archimede. It's all about patina just like my shoes.
I hope yours turns, I had a bronze Henstchel that never did patinate , which was surprising given my location . . . hmmmm, maybe I didn't give it enough time, though this silver started turning very quickly . . .
 

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That's the look patina is what a lot of guys want and if you remove it as a 55 years old watch it lose's it value to some watch buyers i just let it go as i tell most watchsmiths to do service no lume or buffing if it's dinged up then you have to make the call.If it's a watch that will go up in price i find it's looks better when it looks old.but has been serviced so.The watch you have would look nice with no bright shine to it at all well worn dull look with lots of patina makes your watch.Nice looking watch you have there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thx jakedog, yes I'm aware of the patina allure for vintage watches and the value added, doubt this one will ever increase in value unfortunately, appreciate the input!!
 

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I hope yours turns, I had a bronze Henstchel that never did patinate , which was surprising given my location . . . hmmmm, maybe I didn't give it enough time, though this silver started turning very quickly . . .
I think the difficulty we have with patina on WUS, is that we rotate our watches pretty regularly. So it slows down, or changes it.

The bronze and silver patina in different ways. With silver atmospheric sulphur (big cities with lots of traffic) is the main one. Humidity accelerates it. Bronze, I'm not certain.

But either way, the effect that I like is a patina surface with the 'wear' areas exposing the natural metal. Anywhere that the case rubs against you continuously, parts you touch regularly. So bronze would have the brownish patina with the more goldy bronze exposed maybe on the lugs, around the crown. But if we rotate watches frequently, we may not get the wear 'highlights' (I believe denim afficianados refer to a similar effect as 'sick fades') as easily. And also less exposure to whatever tarnishes bronze. With silver, after the 'dirty' phase it can get darker with a purplish tintcouple that to polished 'fades' on the exposed parts and it will look pretty cool. But you'll have to wear it fairly regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Interesting again Dimman . . . . as I remember the Hentschel watch was cast from "ship's propeller bronze", I don't know if that is just a marketing idea or if that "type" of metal resists patination longer (why someone with a boat would care about tarnishing not sure unless somehow it also weakens the metal over time) . . . .
 

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Interesting again Dimman . . . . as I remember the Hentschel watch was cast from "ship's propeller bronze", I don't know if that is just a marketing idea or if that "type" of metal resists patination longer (why someone with a boat would care about tarnishing not sure unless somehow it also weakens the metal over time) . . . .
With marine bronzes, the tarnish/patina acts as a barrier to prevent further corrosion. Stainless steel does the same thing except the chromium oxide layer is transparent.

I don't know what to suggest, though. Keep in mind the whole patina thing is about an old, well cared for piece. Patience, I guess. (There are artificial patina recipes, but that's cheating IMO.)

And just for kicks, you can Google 'bronze statue polished boobs' to get a humorous example of the wear polish and patina together. In this case from tourists grabbing the boobs of bronze statues, actually to the point of causing damage to several. But the colour contrast is what I was talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
With marine bronzes, the tarnish/patina acts as a barrier to prevent further corrosion. Stainless steel does the same thing except the chromium oxide layer is transparent.

I don't know what to suggest, though. Keep in mind the whole patina thing is about an old, well cared for piece. Patience, I guess. (There are artificial patina recipes, but that's cheating IMO.)

And just for kicks, you can Google 'bronze statue polished boobs' to get a humorous example of the wear polish and patina together. In this case from tourists grabbing the boobs of bronze statues, actually to the point of causing damage to several. But the colour contrast is what I was talking about.
Ah, good to know . . .

Boobs . . . good thing my wife's aren't . . . err, forget it ;-) . . .
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Wow James A, I can now see where my watch coloring will be going sans polish intervention, thx for showing!!!
 

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My chemistry background and the watch enthusiasm in me kind of forces me to respond. I think I'll skip the chemistry it can get complicated you can fact check me if you want.

Other than with copper petina is not really a good thing. It is a form of oxidation (think rust) coupled with a reaction to certain metals. The more you clean it the faster it will occur. This has to do with surface area and other physical changes to the surface during cleaning.

Personally I would want the watch to look like the way it was envisioned by the watchmaker when he first made it, bright and shiny. I'm not interested in increased value to some guy down the road. Just me.

If you're into petina wear it a lot and just leave it on your desk, or better yet on the kitchen counter when you take it off.

If you want it shiny, polish it using any of the high end cleaners that contain a polish. The polish usually contains a sealant that creates a barrier to slow down the oxidation. When you done wearing it wipe it with a silver cloth and store it in a zip lock plastic bag with a silver storage strip. These strips absorb the metals associated with tarnish, and the baggy prevents oxygen from getting in.

It's up to you, but do you see women wear tarnished jewelry, does anyone want tarnish on their silverware?

Personally I think the contrast of the highly polished case and that dial would be stunning on your watch. But if you're into it looking old that's cool it's your watch.
 

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Quite interesting to have such an organic piece, have to say I chickened out and went titanium. I think if you wear it often enough, and handle it, it may keep the tarnish at bay, and just promote the patina side of things. Be interested to see how your's develops more over time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Awesome wbird, thank you, it's the kind of info that is really helpful though I also wish there were more pics of silver watches, new, used whatever . .
At any rate, I understand the desire for a newer/shiny watch (all of my others qualify I think) but for some reason I do not mind the oxidation on this one. I'll probably let it go for awhile and then maybe polish (following your suggestions) and start all over again. I guess that'll be sorta like having a new watch in a sense, thx again for the edification . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Quite interesting to have such an organic piece, have to say I chickened out and went titanium. I think if you wear it often enough, and handle it, it may keep the tarnish at bay, and just promote the patina side of things. Be interested to see how your's develops more over time.
Thx, yeah maybe I'll resurrect the thread every now and then with new pics as it "gets dirtier" :-d . . .
 
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