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Another day, another teardown ...

This time, it's my beloved Sea-Gull 816.351. I've put some teaser photos in the post, the full review is at Review: Sea-Gull 816.351 | Watch Guy . This time, I have split teardown and assembly, and I will post the assembly in a couple of days.

Enjoy,

wilderbeest

2012-01-13-092135.jpg
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IMG_5994-smaller.JPG
 

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Can I just say thanks for writing these articles Christian, I really hope you persist with tearing down and continue posting your reports... after all, the mechanics really are the guts of our interest.
 

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Hi Christian!

Very nice and informative articles! I will follow your blog closely :)
I actually own a Seagull 816.351 and it is one of my favorites! After 2 months of use it settled at +1s/day.
It "looks" like a luxury watch in many aspects!
 

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Thanks for the positive feedback! Any suggestions for teardowns, let me know. I won't be able to keep up the current pace, but I intend to do 2 a month or so. Next projects include a 1960s Rolex, a Russian pocket watch and some other weird and wonderful watches ...
 

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Very nice, especially the big pics! One can really see the finish (or lack thereof). I'm sure the watch and movement looks perfectly nice when not peeking through a loupe or microscope. But I'm a bit surprised how rough the edges and chamfers of the holes are (for example in http://watchguy.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/IMG_6006.jpg), and that the plating has damage (from assembly?). From what I've heard on this forum about the difference between third party assemblers and Seagull, I wouldn't have expected this on a Seagull branded watch.
 

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Well, it's not a Rolex or an IWC :) The naked movement retails for around £50 I believe, way cheaper in bulk. For that money, I think the finish isn't too bad. And the photos are pretty high-res and unforgiving. I don't want to see a close-up of many things at that resolution ;-)
 

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Right - I've started on the assembly here - with a bit of a funny ending if you care to read it ;-)

Now it's time for the weekend - have a great one, everyone!
 

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Very nice, especially the big pics! One can really see the finish (or lack thereof). I'm sure the watch and movement looks perfectly nice when not peeking through a loupe or microscope. But I'm a bit surprised how rough the edges and chamfers of the holes are (for example in http://watchguy.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/IMG_6006.jpg), and that the plating has damage (from assembly?). From what I've heard on this forum about the difference between third party assemblers and Seagull, I wouldn't have expected this on a Seagull branded watch.
You should compare it to the ETA 2824-2, you'll see that it the ETA has some rough spots too.

There is a comparison of the TY2130, Hangzhou 3600 and ETA 2824 (all the same basic design) up in the reference section.
 

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I love these teardown artices, thank you both wilderbeest and lysanderxiii. Wilderbeest - I also noticed your breakdown of an older Nomos Ludwig. It might interest you that I own one of the later in-house versions. I would be happy to send a few photos through the back window at least, although I don't have the guts to get further inside as you do. It's quite a pretty movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The damage on the bottom plate struck me as odd as well - almost looks to me like it came from the casting rather than assembly damage. 2012-01-13-094600.jpg
 

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That's not casting damage, because the plates aren't cast, they're machined from bar stock.

Looks like when they pressed in the center post they had some debris on the bottom die. Just take off the high metal.
 
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