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G-Shocks were originally designed to survive a 10 meter drop.

There are a few threads around here where people have deliberately thrown their G-Shocks at a wall or floor and broken them. Those threads have led me to determine the speed of a watch that free-falls 10 meters (approximate 14 meters per second or 31.1 miles per hour) and compare that speed to how fast Little League baseball players can throw (which is a lot faster than that, and most adults can throw even faster). See http://forums.watchuseek.com/f17/how-durable-my-g-shock-910241.html for details.

On the other hand, a G-Shock DID survive a 25 STORY drop test onto concrete: http://forums.watchuseek.com/f17/much-anticipated-results-g-2310-25-story-drop-test-390.html

That led us to wonder in other threads about "terminal velocity of a G-Shock" and how the strap would surely subject the watch to aerodynamic forces. Would an unbuckled strap act as an airbrake or rudder? Would a buckled strap work (even slightly) as a parachute to slow the rate of descent? There are far too many variables to take into account, including "which model of G-Shock?"

It's probably best to just smile and be glad that Casio designed a line of watches that can survive most ACCIDENTAL mishaps that would destroy most other watches.
 

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Depends which terminal we're talking about.

It's own free-fall "terminal velocity"? It's true terminal velocity if fired from an air cannon? It's terminal velocity while strapped to my wrist if I jump from the stratosphere without a chute? The terminal velocity of a bowling ball dropped on it? What we talking here?
 

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Great blog Rostislav, i always enjoy your blogs and thoughts, your a deep thinker, its a good question, id be guessing yes, a lot of them could, maybe the point of impact matters too?
 
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